Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 19

option. Similarly, most guidelines specify
chlorine or chloramines for disinfection,
therefore it can be difficult and costly to
switch to a different chemical disinfectant.
Removal of DBPs before distribution is
often not practical, due to high implementation costs and uncertainty as to whether
the DBPs are forming at the plant or in the
distribution system through reactions with
residual disinfectant. Therefore, the preferred prevention strategy for most utilities
is optimization of treatment conditions to
remove the precursor NOM compounds.
For utilities beginning to address DBP
formation through removal of precursor
compounds, it is crucial to gain an understanding of the NOM present in the source
water matrix influent to the plant. This
is especially important for sources that
experience seasonal/temporal variations,
which is common for many surface water
systems and some groundwater systems.
Traditional parameters for monitoring of
source and treated waters include Total
Organic Carbon (TOC), Dissolved Organic
Carbon (DOC), and Ultraviolet Absorbance
at 254nm (UV254). These parameters are
complimentary to each other, providing
different insights into the overall NOM
makeup, however they each have shortcomings and individually do not reveal the
full picture. Recently, a new photoelectrochemical oxygen demand (peCOD) method
has been developed for fresh water systems. Its low detection limit (<1 ppm), rapid
analysis time (<5 min), and streamlined
operation makes it an ideal parameter for
utilities to implement for source monitoring. ASTM International has published a
new method specific to peCOD (D8084-17),
and the Canadian Ministry of Environment
has also published a method for the peCOD
in surface waters (E3515).
The peCOD method provides a bulk
measure of the chemical oxygen demand
(COD) of the NOM in source and treated
waters. The method involves introducing
a small aliquot of sample to a microfluidics chamber containing Titanium Dioxide
(TiO2). The chamber is then irradiated with
a UV lamp, photo-catalyzing an advanced
oxidation process via the TiO2 (Figure 2). As
the oxidation occurs, charge (Qnet) is generated proportional to the oxygen demand of
the organics in the sample (Figure 3). The
output of the test is an 'oxidation profile',
a plot of the output current (IWork) vs. time.

Figure 1: Disinfection By-product Formation Pathway

Figure 2: peCOD Method Diagram

Figure 3: peCOD Method Chemistry
O N T A R I O P I P E L I N E | FALL 2018 | 19



Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018

The OWWA Report
The OMWA Report
The OWWEA Report
Ontario Provincial Standards are Made for Life in Ontario
QA/QC for the Operational Lab & Online Equipment
The Perils of Misreading and Misusing Standards
Control & Prevention of Disinfection By-product Formation
The Great Lakes Water Festival
Committee Reports
Certification Corner
OWWEA Member Listing
Index to Advertisers
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - Intro
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - bellyband1
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - bellyband2
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - cover1
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - cover2
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 3
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - The OWWA Report
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - The OMWA Report
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - The OWWEA Report
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 7
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - Ontario Provincial Standards are Made for Life in Ontario
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 9
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 10
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 11
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - QA/QC for the Operational Lab & Online Equipment
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 13
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 14
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - The Perils of Misreading and Misusing Standards
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 16
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 17
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - Control & Prevention of Disinfection By-product Formation
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 19
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 20
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 21
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - The Great Lakes Water Festival
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 23
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - Committee Reports
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 25
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 26
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 27
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 28
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 29
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 30
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 31
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 32
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - Certification Corner
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - OWWEA Member Listing
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 35
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 36
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - 37
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - Index to Advertisers
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - cover3
Ontario Pipeline - Fall 2018 - cover4
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https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/OWWQ/OWWQ0218
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