THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 19

Results
The data collected over the threeyear study yielded consistent and useful
results. The consistency of the data
provided reassurance in the accuracy
of the data. Accurate data was very
important to the study because the data
was collected from just a few individual
meters and then applied to entire
populations of customers in each
rate class.
The average gas temperature under
flowing conditions deviates from the base
temperature of 60°F as seen in Figure 1.
Gas temperatures during the non-heating
season months of March to October
stayed consistently well above 60°F. Gas
temperatures dipped slightly below 60°F
during the heating season months of
November to February.
These results lend evidence to
the theory that gas temperature is
contributing to Mesa's LAUF. Greater
temperature deviations from base
temperature during spring, summer and
fall months cause significant enough
negative LAUF deviation that the winter
month positive LAUF does not completely
offset it.
When the analysis was performed over
an annual interval, as illustrated in Figure
2 the monthly variability in the results was
greatly reduced. Analysis has shown that
temperature consistently accounts for
approximately two percent of the
LAUF analysis.

100
90
Fahrenheit

80
70
60
50
40

September-13
October-13
November-13
December-13
January-14
February-14
March-14
April-14
May-14
June-14
July-14
August-14
September-14
October-14
November-14
December-14
January-15
February-15
March-15
April-15
May-15
June-15
July-15
August-15
September-15
October-15
November-15
December-15
January-16
February-16
March-16
April-16
May-16
June-16
July-16
August-16

uncorrected read from the original
index. This eliminated any confusion
when Mesa's meter readers had to read
the meter.
The readings measured at each
location were logged on a 10-minute
interval and included the date and time
stamp, corrected volume, uncorrected
volume, compensation factor, average
flow, and average, minimum and
maximum temperature for each data
point. The data stored in the corrector
was retrieved manually using a laptop
computer on a monthly basis by
employees and the raw data was sent
via email back to the office for analysis.

Residential 1

Residential 2

Residential 3

CNG

Commercial

Base Temperature

Figure 1: Monthly average gas temperature under flowing conditions.

20.0%
10.0%
0.0%
Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

MAy

Jun

Jul

Aug

-10.0%
-20.0%
-30.0%
-40.0%
-50.0%
Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 1 (Temp Adjusted)

Year 2 (Temp Adjusted)

Year 3 (Temp Adjusted)

Figure 2: Monthly analysis of the adjusted and non-adjusted system LAUF.

Conclusion
Through this program, Mesa has
been able to quantify the effects of not
having gas temperature correction on
its meters, which helped Mesa to refine
its LAUF analysis. Given the small-scale,
pilot nature of the program, these results
haven't been incorporated into Mesa's
reported natural gas sales numbers;
however, it has been invaluable for

answering internal questions that have
remained unanswered for decades.
References
[1] "Guidance Manual for Operators of Small
Natural Gas Systems," US Department of
Transportation, Washington DC, 2002.
[2] James Kendell, "Natural Gas Annual," US Energy
Information Administration, Washington DC,
2014.

Non-Adjusted LAUF

Temperature
Adjusted LAUF

∆

Year 1

-4.36%

-2.33%

2.03%

Year 2

-4.77%

-2.59%

2.17%

Year 3

-4.51%

-2.66%

1.85%

Table 1: Monthly analysis of the adjusted and non-adjusted system LAUF.
THE SOURCE | SUMMER 2017, VOL. 9, ISSUE 4 19



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of THE SOURCE - Summer 2017

First Person
APGA Events
Q&A: Representative Walden
A Conversation with an APGA Member
Look Out Your Window
Winning Insight into Gas Losses
Electrify, Electrify
Furnace Rule Update
Legislative Outlook
The Pipeline
Marketing Matters
At Last
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - bellyband1
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - bellyband2
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - cover1
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - cover2
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 3
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 4
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 5
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 6
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 7
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 8
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - First Person
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - APGA Events
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 11
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - Q&A: Representative Walden
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - A Conversation with an APGA Member
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 14
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 15
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - Look Out Your Window
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 17
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - Winning Insight into Gas Losses
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 19
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - Electrify, Electrify
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 21
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - Furnace Rule Update
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - Legislative Outlook
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 24
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 25
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - The Pipeline
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - Marketing Matters
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 28
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - At Last
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - 30
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - cover3
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - cover4
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - outsert1
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - outsert2
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - outsert3
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - outsert4
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - outsert5
THE SOURCE - Summer 2017 - outsert6
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0317
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0416
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0316
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0315
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com