THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 23

providing the opportunity for natural
gas benefits to be enjoyed by more
residential, commercial, industrial, and
power generation customers. There
are challenges though, whether in
terms of meeting cost-effectiveness
criteria for new pipeline systems
or overcoming local opposition to
those who stand against new gas
infrastructure initiatives.
While shale gas has brought forward
major economic and environmental
benefits to the U.S., we remain in an
unresolved public policy position
regarding greenhouse gas emissions
and global warming and the future
role of natural gas. The degree of
polarization on this topic reflects the
spectrum of opinions. For the gas
industry, the issue boils down to what
future public policy course will be
pursued and what are the implications
on how we produce, deliver, and
use natural gas as a least-cost

environmentally beneficial energy
option in this country?
Global warming policy prescriptions
run the gamut. On the more aggressive
end of the spectrum, advocates push
for 80 percent carbon dioxide emission
reductions by 2050, net zero energy
buildings, "beneficial electrification,"
"keep it in the ground" movement, and
other measures that pose an existential
threat to the gas industry and
possible major disruption for natural
gas consumers.
In the midst of this climate policy
uncertainty, the past decade has seen
the U.S. make tremendous progress in
reducing carbon emissions. Much of
this stems from natural gas displacing
coal for power generation. Natural gas
use in generating electricity has risen
70 percent since 2005 and, along with
new wind and solar capacity additions,
has contributed to a remarkable
25 percent reduction in power

sector carbon emissions and a nearly
14 percent decline in national carbon
emissions over that time period.
While shale gas has clearly enabled
a large portion of this environmental
progress, the industry seemingly faces
a "no good deed goes unpunished"
situation going forward. Staunch
proponents of de-carbonization point
to the improving trend in power sector
carbon dioxide emission rate - aided in
large part by natural gas - as a pretense
to pursue broader electrification as a
pathway towards 80 percent carbon
reduction by 2050, for example.
Public policy battles are being
waged on a national and state or local
basis. While federal efforts ping-pong
back and forth depending on the
shifting political center of gravity
among the congressional and executive
branches of the federal government,
states and local government - as
"laboratories of democracy" - are

APGA will be undertaking a new strategic planning
initiative in 2017. This will include a series of efforts to
engage with APGA member companies for their input along
with interaction and input from external stakeholders.

THE SOURCE | FALL 2017, VOL. 10, ISSUE 1 23



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of THE SOURCE - Fall 2017

First Person
APGA Events
A Conversation with an APGA Member: Southeast Gas
Update on DOE’s Furnace Rule
The Second Annual NGV Road Rally
Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) and How it Affects the Direct-Use of Natural Gas
APGA Strategic Planning: What’s Next?
Growing Revenue Without Capital - Combined Heat and Power
APGA Endorses Leading Home Repair Provider
Legislative Outlook
The Pipeline
Marketing Matters
At Last
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - intro
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - ebelly1
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - ebelly2
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - cover1
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - cover2
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 3
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 4
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 5
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 6
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 7
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - First Person
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 9
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - APGA Events
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 11
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - A Conversation with an APGA Member: Southeast Gas
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 13
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 14
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 15
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 16
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - Update on DOE’s Furnace Rule
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - The Second Annual NGV Road Rally
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 19
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) and How it Affects the Direct-Use of Natural Gas
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 21
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - APGA Strategic Planning: What’s Next?
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 23
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 24
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 25
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - Growing Revenue Without Capital - Combined Heat and Power
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 27
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - APGA Endorses Leading Home Repair Provider
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 29
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - Legislative Outlook
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 31
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 32
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 33
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - The Pipeline
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 35
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - Marketing Matters
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 37
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 38
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 39
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - At Last
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 41
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - 42
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - cover3
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - cover4
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - outsert1
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - outsert2
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - outsert3
THE SOURCE - Fall 2017 - outsert4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0317
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0416
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0316
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0315
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/PGAQ/PGAQ0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com