THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 20


feature

Why Energy Codes Matter
and How They Impact Your Utility

here are two primary organizations
in the United States for code
developments: the American Society of
Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning
Engineers (ASHRAE) and the International Code
Council (ICC). The general rule of thumb is
that the ICC develops standards for the residential construction
segment and ASHRAE is responsible for the commercial
building segment.
The ICC develops the International Green Construction
Code (IgCC), the International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC), the
International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and many other
codes. Because the ICC is the main source of standards for the
residential construction segment, they impact how, where and
when natural gas can be used in a home. An overwhelming
majority of state and local jurisdictions already use some version
of the ICC's model codes.
The IgCC is the first model code to include sustainability
measures for the entire construction project and its site,
from design through construction, certificate of occupancy
and beyond. The code is "billed" as being more efficient,
reduces waste, and has a positive impact on health, safety and
20	 THE SOURCE | THE VOICE AND CHOICE OF PUBLIC GAS

community welfare. Many times, groups will use the IgCC to
advocate for an environmental agenda that severely limits or
outright bans the use of natural gas equipment.
The IFGC is responsible for outlining the installation of
natural gas lines. The codes are based on safety standards and
have a huge impact on how natural gas services a home or
building. This code is primarily extrapolated from the AGA-ANSI
Z223 and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 54
Committees.
IECC addresses energy efficiency in several areas including
cost savings, reduced energy usage, conservation of natural
resources and the impact of energy usage on the environment.
Updates from the 2012 version compared to the 2009
amendments resulted in a significant increase in construction
cost.
The basic structure of the ICC code development process is
two tiered. The first part allows for a wide range of proposals
that are accepted, debated and eventually voted on by both
government and corporate members for approval of adoption.
Because historically these votes have had a low voter turnout, a
recommendation of a final standard has often been made based
on very narrow margins.
APGA members are able to participate in the ICC code
development process as a governmental member. This means
that APGA members would have an immediate impact on what
codes are allowed to proceed to the final adoption vote. As an
example, recent votes to augment the International Fuel Gas
Code standards were decided on a margin of less than five
votes in some cases. This puts APGA in a very unique situation
because investor utilities as well as energy efficiency advocates
are not eligible to vote during the final adoption process. APGA



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of THE SOURCE - Winter 2016

First Person
APGA Events
Industry Update: Furnace Rule Report
The Future of Natural Gas in Zero Energy Building Design
Bringing Success to Succession in the Utility World
Taking a Fresh Look at Distributed Generation and CHP
Why Energy Codes Matter and How They Impact Your Utility
Environmental Group and Utility Work Together
Legislative Outlook
The Pipeline
Marketing Matters
At Last
Advertisers’ Index/ Advertiser.com
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THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - cover1
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THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 3
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 4
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 5
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 6
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - First Person
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - APGA Events
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 9
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Industry Update: Furnace Rule Report
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - The Future of Natural Gas in Zero Energy Building Design
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 12
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 13
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Bringing Success to Succession in the Utility World
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 15
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Taking a Fresh Look at Distributed Generation and CHP
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 17
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 18
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 19
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Why Energy Codes Matter and How They Impact Your Utility
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 21
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Environmental Group and Utility Work Together
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 23
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Legislative Outlook
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 25
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - The Pipeline
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Marketing Matters
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 28
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 29
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 30
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Advertisers’ Index/ Advertiser.com
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - cover4
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - outsert1
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