THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 23


operators chose to work closely with EDF,
simultaneously performing leak surveys
and preparing to investigate high
readings. Operators expressed the need
to validate findings to address potential
negative publicity. The polled operators
were well aware of EDF's website posted
review, along with the media release and
stated there were minimal additional
calls from the public and little media
attention. The operators mentioned the
collaboration with EDF on the release,
while others choose to publish a public
notice on their company website to
"engage the public" and provide a survey
explanation of the information and
disclaimer that not all methane emissions
are gas leaks.
Needless to say, by February's
conference call with EDF, Mesa's concerns
and most of our questions had been
answered, and the discussion with EDF
confirmed the information.
The following week, EDF submitted a
drive plan of their proposed areas to
conduct the methane survey. Mesa
replied with a high-level overlay of the
underground piping in those selected
areas. Because one of the areas chosen
had a very low concentration of gas
infrastructure, EDF stated that they
would be revising their drive plan.
Mesa was told that the methane survey
would begin soon and was asked to
provide an emergency contact in case
results indicated a large leak that could
be reported before the survey was

832335_Enerdynamics.indd 1

completed. This was necessary because
information would be collected and then
downloaded daily, with no notice to the
driver of the findings. There would be a
delay in receiving the actual results as the
survey information may not be analyzed
for several days.
Fortunately, this was not the case and
no major leaks were reported. In fact, at
the conclusion of the survey, only three
small leaks were reported on Mesa's
gas system. Those leaks were reported
to Mesa by email and included the GPS
locations of the methane indications.
Because of the low number of leaks
reported, Mesa dispatched leak survey
technicians to all three locations to
investigate the findings. A small gas leak
involving a valve was confirmed at one of
the locations and crews responded that
day to make permanent repairs to the
system. Extensive investigations that day,
and several times since at the other two
locations have not determined the source
of the reported methane.
As indicated previously with other
operators, Mesa collaborated with EDF
to discuss our survey results, the media
launch, and quotes from Mesa leaders
about our system. Drafts of the article and
website language were revised numerous
times, with a final draft agreed upon by
all parties.
EDF provided an opportunity
for Mesa to highlight our system,
its uniqueness, and our proactive
replacement and monitoring

program. Like other operators, Mesa's
infrastructure replacement program has
established criteria that considers the
age of the pipeline and its maintenance
history. Additionally, Mesa considers
criteria regarding the economics of
pipeline replacement in collaboration
with other utility projects. As a
municipality, Mesa owns and operates
a variety of utilities and gas distribution
lines that are commonly installed
utilizing a joint-trench method with
other utilities. The majority of gas line
replacement is driven by a synergy with
other departments' projects to maximize
installation efficiencies, minimize traffic
disruptions, as well as inconveniences to
our customers.
Overall, the experience of working
with EDF on this project was very
positive. Having experience with other
operators, our initial questions were
likely not unique and EDF was sensitive
to our concerns. Understanding that this
project is environmentally driven and
not that of pipeline safety, Mesa would
entertain the idea of a focused, side-byside comparison of leak survey equipment
toward process improvement. The results
verified what we knew about our system
and that our continued commitment to
pipeline safety has proven results that
benefit the citizens of Mesa.
Lyndon Boltz is Compliance Administrator
for City of Mesa- Energy Resources
Department

THE SOURCE | WINTER 2016, VOL. 9, ISSUE 2 23
09/09/16 2:41 AM


http://www.enerdynamics.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of THE SOURCE - Winter 2016

First Person
APGA Events
Industry Update: Furnace Rule Report
The Future of Natural Gas in Zero Energy Building Design
Bringing Success to Succession in the Utility World
Taking a Fresh Look at Distributed Generation and CHP
Why Energy Codes Matter and How They Impact Your Utility
Environmental Group and Utility Work Together
Legislative Outlook
The Pipeline
Marketing Matters
At Last
Advertisers’ Index/ Advertiser.com
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - bellyband1
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - bellyband2
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - cover1
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - cover2
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 3
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 4
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 5
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 6
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - First Person
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - APGA Events
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 9
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Industry Update: Furnace Rule Report
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - The Future of Natural Gas in Zero Energy Building Design
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 12
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 13
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Bringing Success to Succession in the Utility World
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 15
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Taking a Fresh Look at Distributed Generation and CHP
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 17
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 18
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 19
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Why Energy Codes Matter and How They Impact Your Utility
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 21
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Environmental Group and Utility Work Together
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 23
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Legislative Outlook
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 25
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - The Pipeline
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Marketing Matters
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 28
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 29
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - 30
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - Advertisers’ Index/ Advertiser.com
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - cover4
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - outsert1
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - outsert2
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - outsert3
THE SOURCE - Winter 2016 - outsert4
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