PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 10

continued from page 9
will handle on-site communications?
And how will you communicate if
there is no power, no cell signals?
Who will brief the media? Who will be
the liaison to the crisis management
team, attendees, employees, and other
stakeholders? Clarify everyone's roles
and responsibilities, and write it all
down so everyone knows who's who and
what's what - and make sure everyone
involved knows not only their roles but
who's handling what.

COMMUNICATIONS PROTOCOL
Once someone thinks/decides a crisis
is at hand, whom do they tell? And
whom does that person tell? Certain
types of crises, like explosions, will be
immediately identifiable and everyone will
know about them. Other problems, such
as fraudulent tickets, might be noticed
first by the gate guards; do they know
who to tell? The crisis communications
team's roles and responsibilities, along
with directions on how to notify the

team and what information is needed,
must be made available to everyone
involved in the event. Also, how will
they be told? Have you considered what
mass communications you will use?
Even a small event should have plans
for some sort of mass communication in
crisis situations.

DESIGNATED
SPOKESPERSON(S)
Someone is likely to have to speak
to the media, depending on what the
disruption is. What qualities do you want
in a media spokesperson? He or she should
be forthright, calm and able to convey
information clearly and logically - you
can establish any criteria you believe
appropriate. Pick someone on your team
with those qualities and plan to train
them. It's critical to have someone who
is skilled in handling questioning under
pressure, who can take control of an
interview and who is familiar with some of
the tricks of the media's trade. Remember
that media influence can be important
in crisis situations and that, if you don't
provide them with information, they will
find somebody to speculate about it (and
probably make it sound worse than it
really is). It's not just nature that abhors a
vacuum.

SURFACING POTENTIAL CRISES
The easiest way to figure out how to
prepare for a crisis (and to communicate
about it) is to unearth vulnerabilities
and dormant or lurking crises within the
organization. Bring together the crisis
communications and crisis management
teams and hold a brainstorming
session. These folks will have valuable
insights about the organization and its
vulnerabilities and can help figure out
where trouble might originate so you
can prepare for each possible crisis.
Someone also should research information
about the venue and the venue location
to determine if there is a potential for
crisis. Each organization should consider
the unimaginable or unlikely disaster,
the potential vulnerabilities, and any
planned crises, and write them down.
The more you can identify now, the more
possibilities you can prepare for, and the
better your ability to prepare a response.
10

ENGAGE WINTER/SPRING 2018 VOL. 40 NO. 1

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018

President’s Message
A Planned Approach to Event Crisis Communications
Leading in a Crisis
How to Push Emergency Messaging through the App
Venue Participation is Key to the Emergency Plan
How to Leverage Your Speakers During a Crisis
MACE! 2018: What to Know Before You Go
Destination Spotlight
Welcome, New Members!
Members on the Move
Index of Advertisers
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - intro
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover1
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover2
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 3
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 4
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 5
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 6
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - President’s Message
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - A Planned Approach to Event Crisis Communications
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Leading in a Crisis
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 10
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - How to Push Emergency Messaging through the App
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 12
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 13
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Venue Participation is Key to the Emergency Plan
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - How to Leverage Your Speakers During a Crisis
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - MACE! 2018: What to Know Before You Go
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 17
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Destination Spotlight
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Welcome, New Members!
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Members on the Move
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 21
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Index of Advertisers
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover3
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover4
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