PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 9

Leading

By Ronda Keys,
CMP, CMM, CEM

IN A CRISIS

EFFECTIVE AND RESPONSIBLE leadership encompasses
several different components, one of which is leading while managing
a crisis. A crisis can be anything that is disruptive and unexpected that
threatens to damage the organization, its stakeholders or the general public.
Identify the Situation. There may be several situations unfolding at
the same time. In order to manage the situation properly, leaders should
understand exactly what problem needs to be addressed. Once you know
what needs to be solved, you can begin to construct a plan.
Respond Promptly, Not Hastily. Leaders provide direction and react in a
timely manner. In the midst of confusion, focused and deliberate action helps
to reassure others and brings perspective to the situation.
crisis communications - the management
of perception - helps ensure that your
plan will work. It also helps preserve an
organization's credibility, reputation and
business value.
While the very nature of a crisis
indicates something unplanned, and often
totally beyond our ability to predict, you
can take many steps now to help you
prepare for the unpredictable. For example,
a crisis often grows out of a situation
that many people know about but no one
recognized as a potential problem. Or, a
situation that a few people know about
and maybe even planned but failed to
consider as a potential for crisis.

THE CRISIS
COMMUNICATIONS TEAM
Who's on this team will vary from
organization to organization and event
to event, but some responsibilities will
remain the same in most cases. You
have to decide who will make which
decisions. In many cases, it will be the
meeting planner. When the time comes,
someone has to decide if you actually
have a crisis on your hands or not. Who
continued on page 10

Manage Expectations. A crisis is not often a pleasant situation and people
will be looking for a quick response that will make it disappear. The issue
is that there may not be a "quick fix" for the situation. A leader will speak
to the size and magnitude of the situation so as to not alarm anyone.
Communicating this information will help to keep people informed and
provide insight into the complexity of the situation.
Establish Control. There may be several people willing to provide
assistance, but a leader coordinates the people and resources necessary to
resolve the situation. Event professionals have a responsibility to protect not
only the safety and well-being of event attendees, but are also charged with
maintaining the integrity of the organization. You may not be able to prevent
the crisis from occurring, however, you can control the response to it.
Remain Calm. It is important to maintain a calm demeanor as others will
be looking to you as an indicator of how well the situation is progressing. A
leader remains calm and composed when making important decisions that
will impact others.
A leader's best approach in a crisis is to be proactive, actively engage others,
and remain calm. Event professionals who exhibit these qualities are assets
to their organizations.
Ronda Keys, CMP, CMM, CEM is the MPI Potomac Board Director of the
Leadership and Career Development Committees. These committees
are dedicated to helping members enhance their careers by obtaining
certifications and cultivating their leadership skills.

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018

President’s Message
A Planned Approach to Event Crisis Communications
Leading in a Crisis
How to Push Emergency Messaging through the App
Venue Participation is Key to the Emergency Plan
How to Leverage Your Speakers During a Crisis
MACE! 2018: What to Know Before You Go
Destination Spotlight
Welcome, New Members!
Members on the Move
Index of Advertisers
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - intro
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover1
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover2
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 3
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 4
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 5
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 6
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - President’s Message
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - A Planned Approach to Event Crisis Communications
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Leading in a Crisis
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 10
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - How to Push Emergency Messaging through the App
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 12
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 13
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Venue Participation is Key to the Emergency Plan
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - How to Leverage Your Speakers During a Crisis
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - MACE! 2018: What to Know Before You Go
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 17
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Destination Spotlight
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Welcome, New Members!
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Members on the Move
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - 21
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - Index of Advertisers
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover3
PMPI Engage - Winter/Spring 2018 - cover4
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