ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 19

imbalances between energy supply and demand.
The lack of consistent performance from APS generating units to balance production with demand
could result in additional fuel cost, costly emergency purchases, expensive maintenance, dumping energy into the market at sub-zero prices and,
in the case of EIM, penalties for not meeting set
ramp rate and available megawatt targets.
We needed to create a solution that would produce real-time, filterable or scalable results. This
was the perfect challenge for the newly-formed
APS Digital Transformation & Continuous
Improvement (DTCI) organization. The APS DTCI
team seeks to transform our business through
data visualization, advanced analytics, robotic
process automation and continuous improvement. In doing so, we partner with the business
to solve problems. In this case, we partnered with
Fossil Generation, Resource Management and the
ECC to analyze this inefficiency and find a solution
that would improve performance.
To speed the process, the team turned to the
Agile method (an approach to project management that is utilized in software development).
This approach proved extremely effective. Using
iterative work sequences, we were able to address
the complexities involved and develop the product quickly.
The result was the Fossil Unit Monitoring Tool,
a visualization tool that allows for the real-time
monitoring of generating unit performance
within the Energy Imbalance Market (EIM). Today,
this transformational tool is in full use, enabling
APS to identify, review and correct market deviations quickly while understanding the financial
impacts of decisions. When the generating units
perform closer to target, customers benefit from
better cost management decisions through efficient trades, proactive maintenance and lean use
of fuel for only the production needed.
Thanks to its intuitive interface, teaching
operators how to use the tool was easy. For
people actually producing electricity, the tool
gives immediate feedback and allows for quicker
and more collaborative reactions. Additionally,
the tool bridges gaps between the different
groups and improves communication because
everyone is using the same tool.
This tool is now the single source of real-time
unit performance data which enables APS to
respond quickly when needed and operate

more closely to forecasted levels of generation.
Information is readily available to those who need
it through a software portal that displays a unit's
net output, megawatt capacity and generating
targets. The system allows for drilldown detail on
several variables, allowing users to analyze data
quickly and take action, if necessary, to rebalance
generation performance with market targets. It
also shows the potential financial impact of decisions to be factored into consideration.
The benefits of the Fossil Unit Monitoring Tool
were noticed almost immediately. With real-time
unit performance data available, changes could
quickly be identified and implemented to close
gaps between actual generation and market targets, translating to better cost management and
helping the company avoid fees for deviations,
extra fuel purchases and sub-zero market pricing.
This cost containment is then passed along to
customers through rate adjustments.
In addition, the tool allowed Fossil Generation
to tighten a metric target from 85 to 95 percent
due to better performance, create a consolidated
monthly view by unit for compliance, allow for
the configuration to monitor additional specific
performance indicators, and show the charges
associated with balance deviations.
The Fossil Unit Monitoring Tool deployment
was a substantial success and it has quickly
assumed a critical role within operations. Since
introducing this tool, the team has come up with a
metric to measure their own performance, which
they have improved upon by 10%.
Not only was the development of this tool an
unprecedented effort across a cross-functional
project team, but it ultimately helps APS maximize
cost savings to pass along to our customers. By
creating a way to match supply with demand, this
project created efficiencies that further the APS
company vision and commitment to creating a
sustainable energy future for Arizona.
Beyond this tool, we see additional areas of
unit monitoring to continue to understand and
improve fossil unit performance. To date, the
focus has been on capturing deviations between
expected performance (as determined by the
EIM market) and actual performance. A variety
of contributing factors have been considered
to allow the fossil engineering team to correlate issues with how the units are performing. In
addition, by capturing unit limits, it is possible

to monitor if the units are performing outside
of their defined limits, which is a key indicator of
misaligned assumptions.
Moving forward, we see a number of areas
to dig deeper into unit performance and understanding where deviations come from. One
area of interest is to capture and reflect outages identified by operations. This will provide
insights into how well units are delivering given
identified issues. A second area is to gain a more
detailed understanding of controllable losses;
the losses not identified as an outage but that
impact production. For example, if the unit is at
full production on a particularly hot day, the loss
of cooling capacity will reduce the available production. A third area of interest is to understand
the performance of units during start up and
transition between configurations. These critical
times help us meet market demand and gain better insights into how well units are performing.
Additionally, further testing of unit performance
improvements compared to the ideal performance is underway. By using a model approach
to identify how the unit is expected to perform,
new insights can be gained and corrective actions
taken before the unit deviates.
Based on the success of the Fossil Unit
Monitoring solution, a similar set of tools is currently underway to monitor Variable Energy
Resources-wind, solar and geothermal. For
these resources, our objective is to learn how well
production matches forecast in order to improve
our ability to forecast going forward.
Kim Wagie joined APS in 2013 as Director
of IT Applications and has also held a rotational role in Fossil Generation. After completing the rotation, she moved into the
Transmission & Distribution unit to develop
the Data Management & Data Governance
and Advanced Analytics business unit. Wagie
has a BA in Finance & Communications from
the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
and earned her MBA from the University of
Wisconsin-Madison. She is an active member of Utility Analytics Institute, Western
Energy Institute, The Association of Edison
Illuminating Companies and the International
Institute of Analytics. Wagie also sits on the
Board of Directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters
of Central Arizona.
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ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019

RMEL Board of Directors
Former NFL Star and Cancer Survivor Merril Hoge’s “Find A Way” Journey Sparks Intention at RMEL’s Spring Conference
Austin’s Experience Instituting a 5G Wireless Program
APS’ Fossil Unit Monitoring Tool Improves Efficiency, Generates Savings
Charging a Path Towards Battery Storage
Xcel Energy’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Future
28 Steam Turbine Cycling—Operator Considerations, Best Practices and Options for Optimization
Maximize on the New Energy Paradigm at RMEL’s 116th Fall Convention
2019 Calendar of Events
Member Listings
Foundation Board of Directors
Advertiser’s Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Intro
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover1
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover2
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 4
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 5
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - RMEL Board of Directors
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 7
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Former NFL Star and Cancer Survivor Merril Hoge’s “Find A Way” Journey Sparks Intention at RMEL’s Spring Conference
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 9
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 10
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 11
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Austin’s Experience Instituting a 5G Wireless Program
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 13
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 14
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 15
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 16
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 17
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - APS’ Fossil Unit Monitoring Tool Improves Efficiency, Generates Savings
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 19
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Charging a Path Towards Battery Storage
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 21
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 22
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 23
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Xcel Energy’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Future
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 25
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 26
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 27
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 28 Steam Turbine Cycling—Operator Considerations, Best Practices and Options for Optimization
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 29
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 30
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 31
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Maximize on the New Energy Paradigm at RMEL’s 116th Fall Convention
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 33
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 34
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 2019 Calendar of Events
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Member Listings
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 37
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Advertiser’s Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover4
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