ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 22

THE TABLE BELOW ILLUSTRATES RELATIVE DIFFERENCES AND PROS/CONS BETWEEN THE CHEMISTRIES:
Chemistry

Abrv.

Characteristics

Lithium - Nickel - Manganese - Cobalt - Oxide

NMC

Good power, high energy, low cost

Lithium - Iron - Phosphate

LFP

More power than energy, safest, low cost

Lithium - Cobalt - Oxide

LCO

Low power, high energy, less safe

Lithium - Manganese - Oxide

LMO

Balanced power and energy

Lithium - Nickel - Cobalt - Aluminum - Oxide

NCA

Good power, high energy, less safe

Lithium - Titanate - Oxide

LTO

Good power, low energy, long cycle life, high cost

Currently, NMC is the most commonly used
battery, but price spikes for cobalt due to humanitarian unrest in world regions where it is mined
are precipitating battery suppliers to reduce (if not
eliminate) the amount in their cells altogether. LFP
is a challenger to NMC for stationary grid-stability
applications due to its relatively greater stability and lower cost, and some suppliers are even
working to use inorganic electrolytes to make
LFP even more stable.

PUTTING BATTERY
STORAGE TO THE TEST
While battery storage applications are already
operating throughout the country, the education
around them remains lacking. A proof of concept
must be established before widespread adoption
can occur, and like solar before it, the testing
grounds for battery storage applications will be
found primarily on the coasts as gas-fired peaking plants are getting shut down and replaced
with battery storage alternatives, often for environmental reasons (emissions, carbon, sustainability, etc.).
"When we talk to utilities of all sizes, even those
without significant solar penetration, they see
the potential that storage has to fundamentally
change the way they do business," as Liz Waldren,
Black & Veatch Renewable Energy Consultant told
ENR. "They are seeking a path forward-either to
help meet customer demand with a lower carbon
and emissions footprint, to satisfy rising regulatory mandates for reduced reliance on legacy
power generation sources, or to contribute to
reliability and resiliency efforts."
This shift in mentality has advanced beyond
hypotheticals and is being realized on the grid
today, which is why many feel that battery storage
is poised to revolutionize the renewables dynamic
as we know it. "Announcements like those
made recently by an Arizona electric utility-
together with targets established last year in
Massachusetts, New Jersey and most recently
New York-demonstrate widespread, growing
22 ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019

interest in energy storage as a paradigm-shifting
technology," adds Waldren.
In some locations, uncertainty is turning into
clarity as pilot projects get underway to demonstrate the concepts, understand the technology and solidify the risks and business models.
Looking to capitalize on the advantages battery
storage solutions offer, one of the West's top
utilities is working with Black & Veatch on a new
solar project in southern Utah that will combine
renewable power and grid-scale battery storage
to diversify their power generation portfolio.
Panguitch, Utah has a population of roughly
1,500 and benefits from more than 250 days of
sunshine annually. The project incorporates the
installation of a 650-kilowatt array of solar panels, mounted atop a ground-mounted tracking
system, that will transfer the captured sunshine
and route it to a 1 MW, 5 MWh BESS. The project
will be utilized to support the local distribution
feeder by managing periods of high peak load
and provide support to the grid. This concept is
replicable at many points on the grid to provide
enhanced services together with investments in
distribution infrastructure.

EDUCATING-THE MANY
BENEFITS OF BESS
The beauty of BESS is that it can do so many
things that are beneficial to the power grid.
Power batteries can charge and discharge quickly
enough to balance the intermittency of solar
and variability of wind. Power batteries can also
provide the ability to absorb excess solar when
the load is low, maintaining the required voltages
on the power grid. Energy batteries can store
excess energy at noon and discharge it later in the
afternoon and evening when people get home
and start using more power.
Commercial buildings often must pay extra
for the peak amount of electricity that they use.
And they don't pay for the peak just once, they
pay for the next 6 or 12 months. Thus, installing
a BESS adjacent to a commercial building can

lower their electric bill by reducing the peak
amount from the grid by the discharge capacity
of the BESS. This is called a "behind the meter"
system, or BTM.
Resilience is yet another appealing benefit of
BESS, which can provide the resources necessary
to deliver electricity during power outages. A
community can have a combination of rooftop
solar panels charging batteries in what is called a
"microgrid," which acts as a small independent section that can operate and provide electricity during
a power outage, a "front of meter" system, or FTM.
Most recently, the costs of solar photovoltaics
(PV) and batteries (BESS) have come down so low
that solar and storage can be combined into a
"PV Peaker." A megawatt scale power plant, a PV
Peaker will store solar by day, and discharge from
the BESS when needed to meet peak loads on the
grid. Several 20MW systems are already operating
in Hawaii. Urban environments are taking notice
of this and are starting to set policies reducing or
eliminating the operation of natural gas turbines
to improve air quality.
Being able to respond in real-time to peak consumption demands is a bottom-line win for utilities and investing in batteries to manage demand
in lieu of perpetually making upgrades to the grid
is a tantalizing proposition, especially as technologies improve and costs decrease. Educating the
population won't happen overnight, however, but
as BESS projects gain more real-world validation,
the path to building a more resilient and efficient
grid will only become cleaner.

SETTING A STANDARD FOR THE MASSES
Before BESS solutions will achieve mass adoption, there must not only be adequate evidence
that the technology is cost effective and practical,
but also a Distributed Energy Resources (DER)
marketplace for investors to ensure a return on
their asset investment and regulations in place
for the market to follow.
As the volume of projects increase, government regulations will likely be put in place for



ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019

RMEL Board of Directors
Former NFL Star and Cancer Survivor Merril Hoge’s “Find A Way” Journey Sparks Intention at RMEL’s Spring Conference
Austin’s Experience Instituting a 5G Wireless Program
APS’ Fossil Unit Monitoring Tool Improves Efficiency, Generates Savings
Charging a Path Towards Battery Storage
Xcel Energy’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Future
28 Steam Turbine Cycling—Operator Considerations, Best Practices and Options for Optimization
Maximize on the New Energy Paradigm at RMEL’s 116th Fall Convention
2019 Calendar of Events
Member Listings
Foundation Board of Directors
Advertiser’s Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Intro
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover1
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover2
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 4
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 5
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - RMEL Board of Directors
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 7
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Former NFL Star and Cancer Survivor Merril Hoge’s “Find A Way” Journey Sparks Intention at RMEL’s Spring Conference
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 9
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 10
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 11
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Austin’s Experience Instituting a 5G Wireless Program
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 13
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 14
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 15
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 16
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 17
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - APS’ Fossil Unit Monitoring Tool Improves Efficiency, Generates Savings
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 19
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Charging a Path Towards Battery Storage
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 21
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 22
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 23
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Xcel Energy’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Future
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 25
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 26
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 27
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 28 Steam Turbine Cycling—Operator Considerations, Best Practices and Options for Optimization
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 29
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 30
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 31
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Maximize on the New Energy Paradigm at RMEL’s 116th Fall Convention
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 33
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 34
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 2019 Calendar of Events
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Member Listings
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - 37
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - Advertiser’s Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2019 - cover4
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