ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 24

The utility industry has been a cautious,
slow moving industry-for good reason. This
vital service to our communities and nation has such a
great impact on life and business that moving quickly to a new
way of working or a new technology has risks that must be weighed
and taken seriously. As people begin to emerge from their homes into their
communities and begin taking up pre-coronavirus activities, we are making
decisions about how we will operate in a post-coronavirus environment.
As we come out of our coronavirus semi-hibernation, we can ask ourselves
what will change and what we WANT to change.

HERE'S WHAT HAS CHANGED-OR SOME OF IT
As we talk with utilities around the country, we hear some common
themes in what has changed for "pre-corona" operations. Here's some of
what we learned. You will likely recognize most of these themes.
■	 Many in the utility workforce are working from home-at least part of
the time
	 This matches the national trend for other essential businesses and has
resulted in a significant reduction in traffic congestion and air pollution
as a result of less travel.
■	 An increased expression of care and concern for employees
	 Utilities have always had an emphasis on safety as a clear expression
of protection and care for employees. But what we have heard, which
some studies have documented, is that the broad-based expression of
concern for employees has increased.
■	 Comfort with and dependency on new communication technology
	 This coronavirus has radically changed how we communicate with each
other, and that has forced everyone to learn technology they may have
been unfamiliar with before, such as Zoom, WebEx, GoToMeeting or
Microsoft Teams.
■	
The way we get things done-moving from an emphasis on hierarchy to
working together
24  ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020

	
What we've heard from many in the industry is that
people are working collaboratively to get things done, overcoming
barriers and not holding back for a decision from someone above them.
■	 The necessity of adaptability and willingness to embrace new ways of working
	 Change is not easy for most of us. But utilities, like every type of business
across the nation, have been thrown in the deep end of the great pool
of change. We've learned adaptability at warp speed. Where we focused
on control before, we have simply had to keep moving and do what we
could under the circumstances.
We have already learned some lessons from the way we've handled
this difficult time that can help us in the future and ensure sustainability.
We've learned that...
■	 Employees can be trusted to work when they are at home
■	 We can solve problems in a variety of different ways that create good
outcomes
■	 Digital interconnectivity is an essential and valuable aspect of the way
we work
■	 We can learn and learn quickly-whether it's how to navigate Zoom
or how to engage with customers when we can't be at the office
■	 Organizations and employees can and are willing to learn in a variety
of ways, including on virtual learning platforms

HERE'S WHAT HASN'T CHANGED
Lest we get ahead of ourselves, we recognize that while some things
have changed during the last several months, there are other things that
have not changed during this period of disruption and are also not likely to
change moving into the great unknown future. These are the expectations
of utility service from our customers and communities. The demand for
affordable, reliable energy has not changed, and is unlikely to do so in the
foreseeable future. The ability of the utility to efficiently and effectively
deal with severe weather and other causes of service disruption is just as
important as it always has been. No change there. The ongoing need for
newer, better, faster, smarter technology that makes work easier and safer
and supports ongoing communication.
And, we believe leadership still matters. Daniel Burrus, a futurist and change
strategist, makes the point that leaders should build their strategies for the
future on what they CAN be certain about, even in the midst of change.
People look to their leaders not only for signals about future directions but
for ongoing communication. Even if the answer is I/we don't know, knowing
that leaders are paying attention, are invested in people and the future, and



ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020

Letter from the Executive Director
RMEL Board of Directors
Effective Communication & Culture Strategies in Times of Uncertainty
Overcoming Cybersecurity Overload & Security Impacts During COVID-19
Staying Connected to Customer Needs During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic
Now What? A Move to Post-COVID Operation With the Help of e-Learning
2020 Fall Convention
The RMEL Foundation Auction is Going VIRTUAL!
2020 Calendar of Events
Member Listings
Foundation Board of Directors List
Advertisers’ Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Intro
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - bellyband1
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - bellyband2
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - cover1
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - cover2
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 4
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 5
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Letter from the Executive Director
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 7
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - RMEL Board of Directors
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 9
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Effective Communication & Culture Strategies in Times of Uncertainty
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 11
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 12
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 13
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Overcoming Cybersecurity Overload & Security Impacts During COVID-19
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 15
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 16
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 17
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Staying Connected to Customer Needs During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 19
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 20
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 21
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Now What? A Move to Post-COVID Operation With the Help of e-Learning
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 23
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 24
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 25
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 26
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 27
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 2020 Fall Convention
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 29
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - The RMEL Foundation Auction is Going VIRTUAL!
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 2020 Calendar of Events
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Member Listings
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - 33
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - Advertisers’ Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - cover3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - cover4
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - outsert1
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - outsert2
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - outsert3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | SUMMER 2020 - outsert4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0320
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0220
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0120
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0319
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0219
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0119
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0318
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/RMET/RMET0118
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com