ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 19

ELECTRIC ENERGY
WORKFORCE STRATEGIES
By Tom Casey, Managing Principal, Discussion Partner Collaborative with Sean Casey, Director of Communications Military & Veteran Affairs, Comcast NBC Universal

S WE PLAN FOR the future, there are two demographic challenges
that will have to be addressed simultaneously:
1. The accelerated desire of Baby Boomers to retire, many of whom
may remain in the workforce, but not as full-time employees.
2. The painful awareness on the part of Generation X executives that the dreaded age of 50 is imminent, prompting the likelihood
that company/role changes are being contemplated "before I get
too old."

BOOMER EXECUTIVE TRANSITIONS
Discussion Partner Collaborative began researching and providing advisory support on executive transitions in 2013, primarily focused on creating
a "soft landing" for both the senior leader and their company when the
"Boomer" retired.
Both DPC's research and client work, with now over 500 executives,
suggest a much more generous interpretation of the word retirement is
long overdue.
The reality is that most executives, while leaving full-time employment,
remain engaged in myriad capacities such as interim executives, board
members, advisory endeavors, educators and entrepreneurs.
Given the executives now feel "in control of their life and calendar," they
engage in two to three endeavors, usually on a part-time basis.
Discussion Partner's best-selling book on this topic-Executive Transitions -
Plotting The Opportunity!-was reprised with a new book in 2019, Executive
Transitions 2 - Leveraging Experience For Future Success!

AGING DILEMMA FOR GENX
Beginning in 2016, via our research and advisory work in the succession
planning/executive transitions area, we became aware of a significant risk
to enterprise sustainability and engagement.
The identified concern is the pre-supposition of most succession plans
that the pipeline of internal candidates from the Generation X cohort will
remain robust.
DPC experience has concluded this degree of comfort is misguided.
In the strongest possible terms, we suggest companies not presume
longevity of Generation X executives as a given. Our validated premise is as
Generation X executives spy age 50 on the horizon, there is an overt desire
for change. This is not due to unhappiness with their situation; moreover, it
is the concern that when they hit this mystical age, their career trajectory
options diminish.

The above is more prevalent in larger, well-established companies, where
the executive has been associated for approximately 10 years. However,
DPC has also seen in our advisory work the same phenomenon in sectors
such as life sciences and technology where tenure as a rule is short lived.
The need to reflect and plan is now being "down-aged" (late 40s to early
50s) to encompass long-serving incumbents who began working with their
present employers at an early age.
If you put yourself in the position of one of these incumbents, a thought
process encompasses the following:
■ I started with this company right out of school
■ I am 48 years old
■ I like the company-they have been good to me
■ I like my role and feel I am making a contribution BUT!!!!
■ I wonder what it would be like to work somewhere else AND!!!!
■ I need to decide now before it is too late
For those of us in our 60s, 48 is young. However, I would assert that none
of us felt that way when we were 48!
The inherent problems with the above reflections are a) the employee
may leave a good situation just for the sake of leaving, and b) the company
is at risk of a brain drain at the nexus point of identification of future leaders
and sustainability.
Engagement surveys, while informative, do not drill down sufficiently
beyond are "are you happy now?" In addition, those struggling with this
dilemma are most likely reflecting privately.
Discussion Partners, in researching our recent book Inflection Points -
Risk Readiness Failure Fearless on career decision points, began to become
aware this phenomenon.
DPC perceived the issue to be a serious risk to our client population
who have longer-serving employees. Consequently, using the mantra of
"it is better to be supportive than short-sighted," we have been piloting
a coaching interdiction with several companies who fit the above profile.
The offering trajectory advisory service focuses on asking and answering the question for those in their late 40s with approximately 10 years
enterprise tenure: "Is this company and role sufficiently challenging and
engaging that you want to stay?"
DPC began piloting this offering in mid-2016 and have worked with
90 clients to date.
The findings are tenfold based upon the admittedly modest sample:
1. 100% of those with whom we worked admitted to having given "serious
thought" to making a change
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ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019

Letter from the Executive Director
RMEL Board of Directors
Executives Navigate “Strategic Inflection Point” of the Electric Energy Industry—2019 RMEL Vital Issues Forum and Fall Convention Recap
SRP Apprenti Program Trains Former Power Plant Employees for Careers in Technology
The Future Was Yesterday— Electric Energy Workforce Strategies
2020 Events Deliver Diverse Member Company Experiences to Technologically and Operationally Build the Future of the Electric Energy Industry
RMEL Foundation Awards Record 47 Scholarships
2020 Calendar of Events
Member Listings
Foundation Board of Directors
Advertiser’s Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - Intro
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - ebelly1
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - ebelly2
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - cover1
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - cover2
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 4
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 5
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - Letter from the Executive Director
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 7
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - RMEL Board of Directors
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 9
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - Executives Navigate “Strategic Inflection Point” of the Electric Energy Industry—2019 RMEL Vital Issues Forum and Fall Convention Recap
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 11
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 12
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 13
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - SRP Apprenti Program Trains Former Power Plant Employees for Careers in Technology
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 15
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 16
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 17
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - The Future Was Yesterday— Electric Energy Workforce Strategies
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 19
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 20
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 21
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 2020 Events Deliver Diverse Member Company Experiences to Technologically and Operationally Build the Future of the Electric Energy Industry
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 23
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 24
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 25
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 26
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 27
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - RMEL Foundation Awards Record 47 Scholarships
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 29
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 30
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 31
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 32
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 33
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 2020 Calendar of Events
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 35
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - Member Listings
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - 37
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - Advertiser’s Index
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - cover3
ELECTRIC ENERGY | Winter 2019 - cover4
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