Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 22

FaCilities
it’s work that requires some preparation,
and volunteers are asked to wear aprons,
elbow-length gloves, and shoes and clothes
they don’t mind getting dirty. Trash can
be messy, and some can be toxic. Tonie
Miyamoto, director of communications
and sustainability for housing and dining
services, notes that research facilities
are exempt from the waste audit to
avoid the risk of releasing pathogens or
harmful chemicals that might have been
accidentally thrown away.
The waste is separated into three piles:
what could have been recycled, what could
have been composted, and actual trash.
Last March, one day’s waste was 26 percent
recyclable materials, 36 percent compost,
and 38 percent trash. The potential
recyclable pile is further broken down
into the types of materials being thrown
away, which provides the sustainability
task force, the Green Team, information
about the kind of changes that should be
implemented to increase the recycling of
certain materials. For example, they may
target an item like cardboard, creating an
education campaign to remind students
that it is recyclable and moving recycling
bins to areas where it is most likely to be
thrown away.
The most significant change that
Colorado State has implemented to
increase the recycling percentage is
switching to a single-stream recycling
system, which allows students to discard
all appropriate recyclable materials in the
same bin. The easier it is for people to
recycle, the higher the recycling rate will
be; a confusing warning on a recycling bin
will evoke doubt and will send that Coke
can toward the trash instead of where it
belongs.
Another part of their campaign
involves educating students about what not
to recycle, since there are many products
that can contaminate recyclables. As a
result of the waste audits and student
initiative, Colorado State spent about a year
developing a single, straightforward label
that identified the top five contaminants:
compostable containers, plastic bags,
disposable plates and utensils, to-go
containers and Styrofoam, and neon paper.
22

Talking STick

weigH tHe plate
Comprehensive planning is required to
complete the recycling analysis and to
initiate response plans. Staff are needed
to weigh, store, and transport the waste,
and they need some training for this. In
addition, collection carts and compost
methods need to be selected. At Michigan
State University in Lansing, the culinary
services and division of residential and
hospitality services focus their food
audits on the issues of traceability and
cutting costs. Two areas are considered:
pre-consumer waste during kitchen
preparation and cooking and postconsumer waste after a meal has been
eaten. Understanding both origins of food
waste helps to emphasize the efficiency of
using raw materials and ingredients in the
kitchen, the advantages of portion sizing,
the value of specific service practices, and
the need for patron awareness.
Each day, Michigan State serves more
than 30,000 meals. From February to
April of 2012, Carla Iansiti, sustainability
officer, spearheaded a food waste audit
project called “Weigh the Plate,” when
diners’ plates were weighed each week
in one of the 11 dining halls on either a
Tuesday or Wednesday during peak lunch
(11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.) and dinner hours
(5 p.m. to 7 p.m.). The plates were weighed
on electronic scales that, after accounting
for the weight of the plate, quantified the
waste. Overall, general results showed that
the size of the serving utensil is directly
related to the amount of waste; smaller
portions led to less waste. Each consumer
on average wastes about four ounces of
food per visit, based on the 2,590 pounds
of waste for one sample size – a possible
estimate of 1.4 million pounds of food
wasted each year. Michigan State has now
set a goal of 30 percent waste reduction
by 2013. Assuming that guests take two
pounds of food per visit, each would need
to reduce his or her waste by 1.21 ounces
each visit. Reaching this goal would reduce
food waste by 422,000 pounds in 2013,
saving $740,000.
The goal of the food audit goes beyond
simple economics; they also want to raise
student and staff awareness of waste.

Consumers seemed eager to learn how to
reduce their own waste during the “Weigh
the Plate” project, and a marketing strategy
is being developed to engage patrons
in choosing healthier and less wasteful
options.

reCyCle tHe builDings
Reducing waste is not limited to serving
smaller portions in the cafeteria; it can also
apply to the construction of the dining hall
itself. As a part of applying for Leadership
in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) status, campus buildings strive
to reach energy efficiency in categories
such as refrigerant management, thermal
comfort, low-emitting materials, and
construction waste management.
In order for a building to qualify
for the LEED Silver standard for New
Construction and Major Renovations, 50
percent of non-hazardous construction
and demolition waste must be recycled
or salvaged, diverting it from the landfill.
Most colleges and universities implement
this requirement in contracts with
architects and construction companies,
who then track the diversion and report
back for LEED certification. “A contractor
may investigate the building to see if
there are ways to reuse the materials
in the new construction, or if an entire
building is being demolished, the
materials are sorted during demolition for
recyclables and weighed at the disposal
facility,” says Lindsay Komlanc, director
of communications and marketing for
administration and planning at The Ohio
State University in Columbus. Ohio State
was able to recycle and divert 75 percent
of the construction waste from Kennedy
Commons, a 30,000-square-foot dining
hall that received a Silver LEED rating.
They were also able to refurbish much of
the existing furniture in both the dining
and lounge areas of Kennedy Commons.
Recycling efforts also made an
enormous difference at Worcester
Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts,
which constructed a recreation center in
April of 2012, a project that generated
about 820 tons of waste. Due to these
efforts, 715 tons of wood, concrete, metal,



Talking Stick - March/April 2013

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Talking Stick - March/April 2013

Talking Stick - March/April 2013
Table of Contents
New Member Highlight
Vision
Just In
Your ACUHO-I
Transitions
Res Life
Facilities
Regroup
Calendar
A Fair Division of Space
Why They Stay
Conversations
First Takes
Reporting Out
New Members
Snapshot
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Intro
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Talking Stick - March/April 2013
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Cover2
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 1
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 2
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Table of Contents
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - New Member Highlight
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 5
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Vision
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 7
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Just In
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 9
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 10
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 11
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 12
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Your ACUHO-I
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 14
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Transitions
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 16
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 17
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Res Life
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 19
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 20
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Facilities
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 22
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 23
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Regroup
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 25
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 26
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Calendar
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - A Fair Division of Space
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 29
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 30
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 31
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 32
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 33
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 34
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 35
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Why They Stay
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 37
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 38
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 39
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 40
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 41
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 42
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 43
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Conversations
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 45
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 46
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - First Takes
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Reporting Out
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 49
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 50
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 51
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 52
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 53
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - New Members
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - 55
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Snapshot
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Cover3
Talking Stick - March/April 2013 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20190506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20190304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20190102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20181112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20180910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20180708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20180506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20180304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20180102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20171112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20170910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20170708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20170506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20170304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20170102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20161112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20160910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20160708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20160506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20160304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20160102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20151112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20150910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20150708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20150506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20150304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20150102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20141112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20140910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20140708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20140506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20140304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20140102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20131112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20130910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20130708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20130506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20130304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20130102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20121112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20120910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20120708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20120506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20120304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_201201
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20111112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20110910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20110708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20110506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20110304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20110102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20101112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20100910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20100708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20100506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20100304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20100102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20091112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20090910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20090708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20090506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20090304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick_20090102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick1108
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick0908
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick0708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/acuho/talkingstick0508
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com