Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 19

Q&A
cled content in plastics, without
compromising the quality or
performance for packaging, automotive and electronics.

economy principles. We continue to evaluate advancements in
technologies, solutions and collaborations which can increase
the volumes of circular feedstocks to market.
What exactly are 'certified
circular polymers' under the
ISCC scheme? How does
that work?
Sabic's certified circular
products contribute towards
a new value chain, where we
work in coordination with our
upstream suppliers and key
downstream customers to upcycle used mixed plastic back
to the original polymer.
Our certified circular polymers are produced through
the feedstock recycling of low
quality, used mixed plastic that
would otherwise be destined for
incineration or landfill. It takes
difficult-to-recycle used plastic back to the molecular level
through a process called pyrolysis. This technology breaks
plastic down by heating it at a
very high temperature in an
oxygen-free environment, producing pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil then needs to be refined
and upgraded for use as feedstock. This process culminates
in polymers that have identical
properties to virgin-based polymers and allows plastics to be
recycled over and over again,
with no loss of properties or
characteristics.
Our certified circular polymers are recognised through
the International Sustainability
and Carbon Certification plus
(ISCC+) scheme that certifies
content and standards across
the value chain from source
to end product. The ISCC+
certification works on what
is known as a 'mass balance
system', meaning that for each
tonne of circular feedstock fed
into the cracker and substituting fossil-based feedstock,
a tonne of the output can be
classified as circular.
To what extent does 'renewably sourced' play a role in
Sabic's view of sustainable
packaging?
Certified renewable materials are one of our complementary solutions offered as part
of our TRUCIRCLE portfolio
Our renewable polymers are

Sabic's certified circular polymers
are recognised through the International Sustainability and Carbon
Certification plus (ISCC+) scheme

We are committed to
collaborating with upstream
and downstream partners to
drive to establish a value chain
for plastics which is built around
circular economy principles.
high-quality virgin polymers,
based on second-generation
bio-based feedstock - such as
waste from wood pulping processing. Like Sabic's circular
polymers, its renewable polymers have been accredited and
certified through the International Sustainability and Carbon Certification plus scheme
(ISCC PLUS).
The products, including our
renewable polycarbonate, do
not interact or compete with
the human food chain and can
help to reduce both CO2 emissions as well as the use of fossil
feedstock during production.
The performance of the renewable materials is equal to that
of materials produced using
fossil feedstock; they feature
the same properties, do not impact production and processing
methods and increase the recyclability of the product.
Our range of certified renewable products are made to the
same high specifications as
materials made using traditional
feedstocks, making it a solution
that can work seamlessly with

current production processes.
What about mechanical recycling - what is the share of
products derived through mechanical recycling in the TRUCIRCLE portfolio?
Mechanical recycling has an
important role to play in our
journey towards closing the
loop on used plastic. As the
most mature of the recycling
technologies on the market today, it offers an ideal solution
for the recycling of high purity
mixed-used plastics. It is also a
solution that is helping to create a crucial bridge between
today's linear economy and
a more sustainable, circular
economy for plastics. It is complementary to other circular recycling processes and solutions
including advanced recycling,
which can process more challenging, mixed-used plastic,
such as films and plastics bags,
where mechanical recycling is
not an option.
Our approach to mechanically recycled products aims to
include high amounts of recy-

What is Sabic's approach to
designing for recyclability and
how is the company supporting its customers in this area?
A challenge facing plastic
recycling is the fact that often
a product is made of many different plastic elements or layers
which serve different functionalities, which makes it more
difficult to separate and recycle. Up to 80% of a product's
environmental impacts are determined at the design phase,
so manufacturers must work
together with customers to design packaging solutions which
can be recycled effectively.
On a product level, we strive
to embed sustainability in packaging product design and development to make sure the products on the market can be fed
back into the value chain. This
process should include efforts
to reduce the complexity of the
materials and polymers used to
create a specific product.
At Sabic, we focus on both
packaging design as well as
product development to promote the better re-use and
recycling of our customer's
solutions.
Packaging will be required
to meet various new EU recycling requirements in 2025
- to what extent have the strategic choices made by Sabic
been influenced by these?
Certified circular technology
is still in its infancy and there
are a number of steps required
to make the technology truly
scalable, so it becomes a more
competitive option when compared to virgin polymers. We
are determined to increase the
volume of recycled products we
process in Europe to 200 kilotonnes by 2025, in line with our
pledge to the EU Commission.
To do this, we are working
with a range of partners to
considerably increase our supply of certified circular polymers through the construction
of our first commercial plant,
situated in the Netherlands.
The project relies on value
chain collaborations and incontinued on page 20

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Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021

Contents
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - Cover1
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - Cover2
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - Contents
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 4
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 5
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 6
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 7
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 8
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 9
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 10
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 11
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 12
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 13
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 14
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 15
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 16
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 17
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 18
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 19
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 20
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 21
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 22
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 23
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 24
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 25
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 26
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 27
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 28
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 29
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 30
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 31
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 32
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 33
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - 34
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - Cover3
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2021 - Cover4
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