Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 26

sustainable packaging
continued from page 25
had to be robust enough to
ensure caps and lids were of
appropriate strength, reliability
and safety while remaining
attached to the beverage container
during the product's use,
in order to adequately fulfill the
goal of the tethering requirement.
Considerations included
tooling design, the weight of the
cap and the cap manufacturing
process, with brands, packaging
producers and equipment
suppliers joining together to
create compliant solutions.
Although its development
was marked by delays, on 30
May 2023, the new harmonised
standard for test methods and
requirements to demonstrate
that plastic caps and lids remain
attached to beverage containers
was published in the Official
Journal of the European Union.
Design solutions
A variety of solutions have
been developed to produce attached
caps that comply with
the standard. Broadly speaking,
manufacturers of caps and
closure systems have pursued
two main approaches, namely
the development of hinged
tops and of lasso closures. Both
approaches offer a slew of different
concepts, with considerations
depending on the type of
machinery already in use and
the associated costs of modifications
required.
These associated costs are a
key consideration for the whole
supply chain involved in the
single-use beverage market,
as customer surveys and sales
meetings alike show that adding
a cost to the consumer is
unlikely to be well received. So,
the tethered closure that offers
legal compliance alongside little
or no additional cost is king.
Sacmi, supplier of machines
and complete plants for the
packaging industry, has led
the compression technology
market for over 20 years, offering
a combination of support
and technical capabilities for
all types of closures. Valentina
Gollini, head of group PR and
communications, shares that
its wide range of both standard
and tethered closures are available,
with a particular demand
increase seen for tethered clo26
Sacmi
slitting blade
sures for 26/22mm necks. Gollini
says, " Sacmi has developed
the widest range of caps on the
market, certified by leading international
brand owners that
comprehensively supports customers'
product development
journey, offering the best solution
in terms of both functionality
and design. Our proposal
for manufacturing plastic caps
involves slitting the tamper-evidence
band, both traditional
and tethered, through a machine
located downstream of
the press. The slitter receives
the already-oriented caps and
handles them using rotary spindles;
the caps interact with one
or more knives that partially cut
the wall of the caps. The molded
caps have a straightforward design
because they lack the complicated
structure of the band. "
One packaging producer
that has chosen the Sacmi machinery
as part of its portfolio
of tethered closure production
is Retal, which has needed to
adhere to its global beverage
brand customers' wholesale
adoption of the SUPD regulations.
By utilising its in-house
design team, with access to
sophisticated CAD technology
and its relationship with machinery
partner Sacmi, Retal
has developed a tethered closure
using compression technology
that has no cost to its
customers as it is just a simple
adjustment in the slitting tooling.
Anton Sugoniaev, head of
R&D, explains, " We call this our
EasyTether. We can show our
customers how it allows them
to be in good time for the legislation,
with no cost to them
or changes to their production
line. It's important to be able to
look differently at a problem, to
be open-minded about a potenJanuary/February
2024
tial solution; don't forget that
these caps with a remaining
connection would have previously
been considered defective. "
The EasyTether adds to
Retal's 1881 tethered portfolio
with conventional hinge system,
and it is joined by its 1810,
29/25 and 26/22 compatible
tethered closures.
Brand benefits
Packamama, the team behind
the traditional wine industry-disrupting
flat rPET wine
bottles, have been similarly
quick to adopt this sustainability-driven
tethered closure,
particularly as its name is synonymous
with progressive
packaging. Alex Adda, leading
the tethered closure project for
the company that rebranded
from Garcon Wines in 2022,
says, "" EU Directive 2019/904,
stipulating that from July 2024
onwards plastic caps on all
beverage bottles of 3 litres or
less must remain attached to
the bottle after opening, was
announced in 2019. This fiveyear
period was more than
enough time for all companies
to prepare for this, even if a new
cap needed to be created from
scratch. Keeping the cap attached
to the bottle is a sensible
approach to capturing this material
for recycling. The technologies
exist to allow for tethers
to be offered, and if completed
properly, this has no impact on
the experience for the consumer.
However, it does allow for
valuable material not to be lost
in the process. For this reason,
at Packamama, we support the
legislation. We commenced engagement
with our cap supply
partner on this in February 2021,
and we already have a solution
that can be utilised as the legislation
should come into force
this summer. Packamama offers
the future of wine packaging
today. We supply our novel
eco-flat wine bottles to leading
wine producers and retailers to
engage consumers and to save
cash and carbon from wine's
supply chain. Our multi-awardwinning
bottles are flat-pack
designs to save space and are
made from 100% recycled PET
to save weight and energy,
slashing emissions and offering
a competitive advantage. "
The implementation of tethered
closures for single-use
plastic beverage packaging up
to 3 litres may currently only be
an EU legislation, but it is likely
that this is just the start. As
Sacmi's Gollini says, " Even if
the tethered standard will become
mandatory in the European
community within July 2024,
we see an expansion beyond
the European borders, where it
is expected to be voluntarily adopted
in different markets and
areas. Standardization, sustainability
and differentiation are
some of the drivers of this transition.
Economic sustainability,
too. Regardless of mere payback
time, a cap manufacturing
line is a durable commodity with
an average life typically close to
10 years. During this time, the
market and its regulations can
undergo radical changes, as is
happening with the introduction
of the tethered cap. "
With responsible nations
leading the way, it is expected
that more countries will see regulations
forcing the adoption of
attached closures for convenient
beverage packaging, including
the US, with California passing
the Assembly Bill 793 mandate
for recycled content in 2020, and
Australia, where a wide-reaching
strategy for reducing 'problematic'
plastic use includes a
proposal for banning takeaway
containers by 2025. As long as
the key players in the plastic
packaging supply chain stay forward-thinking,
this is cause for
celebration rather than concern.
With global brands welcoming
the practicalities of standardised
procurement and plastic packaging
producers keen to be part
of the solution, the tighter regulations
offer an interesting - and
welcome - challenge.

Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024

Contents
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover1
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover2
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Contents
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 4
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 5
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 6
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 7
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 8
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 9
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 10
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 11
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 12
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 13
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 14
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 15
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 16
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 17
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 18
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 19
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 20
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 21
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 22
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 23
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 24
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 25
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 26
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 27
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 28
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 29
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 30
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 31
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 32
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 33
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 34
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover3
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover4
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