Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 28

Q&A
Landfill gas is an undervalued
feedstock
continued from page 27
role in the process? How do
you come into it?
What we've done is we've developed
a technology that will accelerate
the conversion of plastic
waste in landfills into landfill
gas but only after the LMOP
biodigester environment is established.
We've been working
on this for over 12 years, and my
associates and I have got over
14,000 hours into this.
Technically, you could call
what we are doing recovery. It
meets EPA requirements; as a
matter of fact, we are an LMOP
partner of the EPA in Washington,
DC. Our technology increases
the yield of the LMOP
landfills, creating a renewable
resource, a low-carbon fuel
source (LCFS), which not only
can be used for energy purposes
but can be turned into
organic chemicals and used to
make new plastics.
You know, in the United
States, we don't make plastic
out of oil; we make it out of natural
gas. So, we're taking it from
natural gas, and we're putting it
right back into renewable natural
gas. You won't lose any
quality or performance compared
to the fossil fuel version
- they are interchangeable.
How does your technology
work? Can you explain a little
about that?
We supply a product in a masterbatch
- or compound, if you
want to call it that. It goes into
the fossil fuel plastic when it is
being processed. Although we
are talking with resin producers
about incorporating our tech28
nology
in their resin production.
Right now, we are mainly dealing
with brand owners, major retailers,
end users and converters.
Does this technology use enzymes
or some kind of catalyst?
No, we do not use enzymes. No
enzymes are approved by the
Food and Drug Administration,
nor are they approved by the
EPA in the United States.
This RNG Plastic is FDA-approved
and organic - there are
actually quite a few diff erent
substances we can use. One
popular one we use is a complex
sugar, a polysaccharide
- starch, if you will. But not just
any one will work. And we use a
nanoparticle size, which allows it
to be basically 100% bio-assimilated.
The homogenous blend
throughout the plastic provides
an even dispersal of the food for
the microorganisms.
What is left after the process
is finished? Are there any toxic
residues?
No toxic residue. The only thing
left over is a little bit of water
vapor and a little bit of biomass.
And the biomass is really
the [dead] bugs. And they're
going to be there anyway. So,
from that perspective, that's
good because that little bit of
leftover biomass is really a very
rich soil amendment.
The technology is described
as a polymeric algorithmic
compound, which is a bit of
a mouthful.
I should point out that that's not
my description, but it is what my
research team came up with as
January/February 2024
a way to describe this new category
of substances that is already
becoming quite popular.
But, basically speaking, to
break it down: polymeric - that
obviously refers to the fact of
its being a polymer. The algorithmic
part refers to what I
was explaining earlier about
what happens in the LMOP
landfill. An algorithm is basically
a set of rules or conditions.
In this case, the algorithm is to
not prematurely biodegrade,
release any greenhouse gas or
in any way aff ect any performance
qualities - but simply
stay dormant in the landfill -
until the wells are drilled. Then
when the biodigester environment
is created, it triggers the
process to start.
Lastly, it is a compound,
because that's what masterbatches
are.
We're actually working on a
diff erent application with liquid
resins, as well, which is
a very attractive market in a
way - very vulnerable to contamination.
We don't care if it's
food-contaminated. In fact, we
like food-contaminated plastics
because that's just more food
for the microbes.
So, the reason that the product
has no negative eff ects on
material properties, quality, recycling
or anything else is because
it only starts to work in
this very specific environment?
Right. Basically, when it starts
heating up. And even then, it
doesn't happen right away. It
has to stay at the higher temperature
for a while. Obviously,
we have patents pending on
this. RNG Plastics Corporation
supplies our technology for
plastic products used in North
America, and we may be licensing
the technology overseas.
Outside of the United States -
for example, in the EU- the focus
is on reducing the amount
of waste that goes to landfill. In
fact, the amended EU directive
on the landfill of waste specifically
states that member
states must 'take the necessary
measures to ensure that
by 2035 the amount of municipal
waste landfilled is reduced
to 10% or less of the total
amount of municipal waste
generated (by weight)'. Do you
have plans to market this technology
internationally?
We are focusing on the US and
Canada, where the situation is
very similar. We've specifically
tailored the technology for the
EPA and the LMOP landfills in
the United States of America
and Canada. Can we adjust it
for other countries and other
applications and other biodigester
environments? Yes, but
we are sticking with the United
States and Canada for now.
Although that said, we are
in discussions with companies
who also have interests in Europe.
And they're very curious
about how Europe might look at
this, especially as contaminated
plastics are easily dealt with using
this technology. Contaminated
plastics mean nothing to us.
Food, blood or whatever - our
plastics are going to be bio-assimilated
as long as they end up
in the biodigester environment
of an LMOP-type landfill.

Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024

Contents
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover1
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover2
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Contents
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 4
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 5
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 6
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 7
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 8
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 9
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 10
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 11
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 12
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 13
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 14
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 15
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 16
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 17
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 18
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 19
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 20
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 21
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 22
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 23
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 24
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 25
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 26
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 27
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 28
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 29
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 30
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 31
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 32
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 33
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - 34
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover3
Sustainable Plastics - January/February 2024 - Cover4
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