Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 18

inside at.... Ship & Shore Environmental
Air knows no geographic
boundaries: pollution control
is a shared responsibility

continued from page 17
ical climate cannot change
things back to the way they
were. "That train has left the
station," said Oskouian. "We
do not have any geographic
boundaries in our air, so we are
all responsible for everything
that happens elsewhere."
That is one of the driving forces behind the company's ambition to expand its presence in
countries where air pollution remains a major issue. "Or in any
geographic area, that we either
identify as being geographically
desirable or technologically desirable," she added.
Already well represented in
the USA and in Canada, where
the company works through a
representative, in 2015, Oskouian started exploring the opportunities in China, as the burgeoning industrial development
in that country meant that it was
also being confronted with severe pollution issues. The country was implementing very tight
rules, that were being strongly
enforced. Her approach to establishing a footprint in any
new region is straightforward:
find partners - companies and
entities - in the targeted area
and build collaborations and
partnerships. In China, this ultimately led last year November
to the company's setting up its
own manufacturing facilities in
that country.
"We had assembled a team
we were very comfortable
working with and can now
manufacture all the products
for the Chinese market in China,
instead of having to ship everything from California. And we

18

May/June 2020

are now doing the same thing
in Thailand, where there is also
a need to address the pollution
problem, as well as India," Oskouian explained.
Ship & Shore is also hoping
to grow its presence in Europe
as well. Although it had previously been relatively active
there, since around 2007, when
the financial crisis hit, those activities had been dialled back.
Now, as the European Union

of different packaging materials
on the environment. How many
people know, for example how
the production and use of a
plastic bag truly compares to a
paper bag?
"We need to educate people on how to handle things,
rather than banning things. We
work with resin societies, we
work with chemical producers,
we work to address chemical
pollution out of the facility; but

You can't kill the industry and
expect growth in any country."
Anoosheh Oskouian
Ship & Shore Environmental
becomes increasingly serious
about the need for a greener, more circular economy, the
company sees more opportunities in these countries as well.

Collective responsibility
Regarding sustainability issues,
such as the circular economy
and plastic waste, Oskouian
is adamant about the need for
a better informed public, and
even agencies. "As much as we
like to adhere to rules and regulations and do the right thing
I often find that are areas and
segments where agencies are
not aware as to what is feasible
and what is not feasible, for example, with rules that are more
stringent than technology could
ever address," she noted.
The public is also largely unaware, especially when it comes
to plastics, and the true impact

we have always been a big advocate on behalf of the industry
because we don't want to kill
the industry: you can't kill the
industry and expect growth in
any country," she said.
"People need to know that we
are taking measures, that we
are taking responsibility. This
should be communicated to the
world, to the public, to consumers and it is something we must
play an active role in," she said.
"Yes, people have businesses to
run, and obviously they should
make sure they do so. But at
the same time, we need to remember that consumer education is really very important. We
have to work to gain the trust of
today's consumers and, while it
may take a little bit of work, I am
convinced it is something we
should stay focused on and just
do. There is no other way to get
the facts, figures and the scien-

tific information out. And if we
don't do it, the scaremongers
will - and those are the ones we
really have to watch for."
She continued, noting that
circularity may well be feasible, but 'the issue which I try to
address in these discussions is
where do we draw the line of responsibility?'
In her view, consumers are
responsible, producers, equipment suppliers - all have a
share of the responsibility. It is
the gaps between where the
one stops and the other takes
up that must be narrowed.
"For example, imagine I am
an equipment supplier selling a
piece of equipment that causes
pollution. Don't I have a responsibility to ask this customer how
the company is going to take
care of that - does it have a
policy in place, instead of doing what still often happens,
which is saying 'that's not my
responsibility - I sold the equipment and I don't care what happens next'. We've had situations
where we've had to deal with
just that: equipment suppliers
saying, well, that has nothing to
do with us, " she recalled.
Short-term thinking is something society can no longer afford to do.
"I don't have the perfect answer," she concluded. "But I
think we are on a road trying
to find the way forward. But
we need to think on the longer
term if we want to have a world
we can leave for the next generation. Companies with that
mindset are the ones that will
adapt and be successful - and
ultimately survive."



Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020

Contents
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - Cover1
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - Cover2
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - Contents
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 4
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 5
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 6
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 7
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 8
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 9
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 10
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 11
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 12
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Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 15
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Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 17
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 18
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Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 37
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 38
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 39
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - 40
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - Cover3
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2020 - Cover4
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