Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 25

inside at... Agilyx
Waste input for recycling.
bust technology that is characterised
by a number of specific
features. It is a combination that
drew Larsen to the company,
which he joined as chief commercial
officer last September,
after a 25-year career spent at
Dow. " This is what made Agilyx
stand out to me personally, and
I think now, too, the industry
is discovering this as well. The
company is a very interesting
technology provider, " he said.
He explained: " First, the inAgilyx's
facility.
And yes, it is easy to be critical,
but I haven't heard a better alternative.
Is there potential to
make this system more effective?
Absolutely. That's exactly
what we are working on. "
Integrated approach
Pyrolysis technology is nothing
new. In fact, it was used in Middle
East up to 5,500 years ago
to make charcoal, while the ancient
Egyptians used it to make
tar for caulking boats as well
as certain embalming agents
used for mummification purposes.
Today, numerous pyrolysis
technologies are being developed
by chemical recycling
companies to process waste
plastics of all kinds.
What distinguishes Agilyx
from the rest are, in Larsen's
opinion, two things. In the first
place, the integrated approach
with Cyclyx, which is basically
focused on establishing
new waste supply streams by
matching these to the different
conversion technologies used
by Cyclyx members; and second,
the development of a rotegrated
approach with Cyclyx.
It is unique in the industry
- there's currently no one else
offering both waste collection
and the technology to turn this
into feedstock. Existing waste
management companies in
the industry have the waste
plastic, but not the necessary
conversion technologies. What
happens today is that waste
is sorted, it is washed and the
purest is diverted to mechanical
recycling. Of the remainder
that's already been washed and
cleaned, the film fraction can
go to some of the technologies
on the market today. But then
you're left with a lot of other
waste, which tends to end up
being landfilled or incinerated. "
Unlike the average waste
management companies in the
business, Cyclyx is capable of
chemically characterising the
composition of the waste, based
on the datasets built up from
Agilyx's almost two decades of
experience in this space. This expertise
means that the teams at
Cyclyx know how certain kinds
of waste react when processed,
enabling them to develop recipes
for conversion technology.
" It is a novel way of thinking, "
said Larsen. " That you could
put feedstock A together with
feedstock B and a little bit of
feedstock C and arrive at a perfect
feedstock for a conversion
technology that will produce
good oil. "
Many companies, he pointed
out, that want to engage in recycling
have difficulty knowing
what kind of waste they need,
or if they know what they need,
they have no idea where to find
it. " Cyclyx tells these companies
we know where to find it.
We know how to prepare it. And
we know how to get it to you in
a recipe form that fits with your
process. It's like a matchmaking
capability, " he said.
The success of the Cyclyx initiative
demonstrates the industry's
need for a solution like this.
Agilyx owns 75% of Cyclyx and
ExxonMobil holds the remaining
25% of the shares. Organised as
a consortium, companies in the
industry can join to take advantage
of the available expertise
and to procure the input waste
tailored to their needs. The aim
is to take the cost out of the system
by establishing new supply
chains.
" LyondellBasell, for instance,
if they want feedstock for their
mechanical recycling business,
Cyclyx can help. Does ExxonMobil
want feedstock for their
chemical recycling business?
Cyclyx can help. It's a kind of
pass-through model at cost, "
said Larsen.
Agilyx receives a royalty for
the tonnes that pass through
the facility for the use of the
Agilyx database or dataset, predictive
modelling and the artificial
intelligence connected with
this.
" The interest is to drive cost
down and to make plastic recycling
cost-competitive. That's
why people say this is what the
industry needs. It's an initiative
that has originated from the industry
itself, instead of having
been imposed by the EU or another
regulatory body, and this
is precisely what makes it more
acceptable to the industry. It
is truly unique in that the five
largest plastics companies have
signed up to this despite the
fact that ExxonMobil owns 25%
of Cyclyx. Truly, that's an almost
unthinkable thing in the plastics
industry, right? This signals the
need and the willingness for
this kind of solution. "
Robust technology
In terms of technology, too,
there are a number of distinctive
features that set Agilyx
apart, according to Larsen.
Unlike various other pyrolysis
technologies developed,
the conversion process used
by Agilyx does not, for example,
use a catalyst. " What we've also
done is electrified the reactor, "
he explained. That means we
can put green energy into play,
run it on renewable energy,
which means a lower carbon
footprint. " That does not imply
that each reactor to be built using
technology will be powered
by electricity, but by electrifying
its plant in Tigard, Oregon,
Agilyx has now shown that it is
possible to use renewable energy
if customers should choose
to do so.
Another difference is the
ability to apply heat and pressure
in a very targeted, precise
way throughout the reactor as
a result of its design featuring
various temperature zones. " As
a consequence, the technology
can actually perform what you
might call thermal depolymerisation,
something that is norcontinued
on page 26
May/June 2022
25

Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022

Contents
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - Cover1
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - Cover2
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - Contents
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 4
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 5
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 6
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 7
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 8
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 9
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 10
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 11
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 12
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 13
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 14
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 15
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 16
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 17
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 18
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 19
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 20
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 21
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 22
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 23
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 24
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 25
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 26
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 27
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 28
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 29
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 30
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 31
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 32
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 33
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 34
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 35
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 36
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 37
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - 38
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - Cover3
Sustainable Plastics - May/June 2022 - Cover4
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