Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 25

construction
Green must
be the colour
of the cities of
the future
Plastic materials are key
to building a sustainable
modern city.
The materials used in the construction process will be key to the success and
sustainability of smarter, modern cities, as the world contends with intense
population growth. Plastic building materials and piping will be key to success
in creating sustainable, modern cities that consume less energy and have less
of a detrimental impact on the environment. - By Martin Wiescholek, Market
Development Building & Construction at Sabic, and Geert Drummen, Senior
Business Manager Pipe & Utilities Europe at Sabic.
T
he UN's latest estimates
suggest the
world's urban population
will increase
by around 2.6 billion between
2010 and 2050, which represents
an increase of more
than 70%.
The urban population already
consumes a disproportionate
volume of the world's
energy supply, and will ultimately
have a disproportionate
impact on the environment.
With around 54% of the
world's population currently
living in urban areas, it is this
group that consumes 70% of
the world's energy.
Plastic materials are inherently
more sustainable than
using traditional materials
such as steel or glass, as plastics
can be easily recycled at
lower temperatures and have
much lower CO2 generation in
their production and transportation
process.
The challenges of
urbanisation
Urbanisation presents two key
challenges when it comes to
the construction of buildings:
demand for energy and demand
for space. In turn, both pose
sustainability challenges in the
construction of new buildings.
Sabic's building and construction
team has been reviewing
these megatrends in
order to create roadmaps that
meet industry needs. One key
trend that we have noticed in
the journey to adapt to the energy
transition is the merging
of technologies - collaboration
is necessary to achieve meaningful
progress.
A prime example is delivering
on the growing demand for energy,
which is impacted by the
scarcity of space in urban areas.
Energy is needed most in areas
of high urban density, but it is
in these areas where space is
also a scarce resource. As we
accelerate towards the energy
transition, it is also vital that this
energy increasingly comes from
clean sources.
It is clear from societal trends
that this demand for energy will
only continue to rise - particularly
when we look at trends
such as the growing introduction
of electric vehicles (EVs)
into urban spaces. Bloomberg
predicts that global electricity
consumption from EVs will
grow from 6TWh in 2016 to
1,800 TWh by 2040.
So, what is the role of construction
materials in meeting
the triple challenge of creating
buildings that are more sustainable,
cater to a growing energy
demand and can cater to
space scarcity?
Energy savings
One key area where we have
identified we can make a difference
is through energy savings.
In a world where energy
demand is expected to grow
exponentially, it is important to
cut back on energy usage and
reduce CO2 emissions wherever
possible.
We focus heavily on delivering
energy savings through insulation
materials. The building
and construction industry has
considerable potential to help
save thermal energy, as eff icient
insulation in buildings is the
most eff ective route to saving
on heating and cooling costs.
It can significantly decrease
thermal transfer, thus reducing
heating or cooling requirements
by as much as 75%. Its
eff ectiveness at reducing energy
consumption means there is
growing demand for heat insulation
- which conversely can
itself have an environmental
impact in increased production.
This is where polymer foams,
continued on page 26
August/September 2021
25

Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021

Contents
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover1
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover2
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Contents
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 4
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 5
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 6
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 7
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 8
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 9
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 10
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 11
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 12
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 13
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 14
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 15
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 16
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 17
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 18
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 19
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 20
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 21
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 22
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 23
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 24
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 25
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 26
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 27
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 28
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 29
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 30
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 31
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 32
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 33
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 34
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover3
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover4
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