Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 31

polymer prices
Prices tumble as supply
shortages ease
F
ollowing months of
sharply rising prices,
contract prices
for most classes of
standard thermoplastic finally
started to fall over the last two
months, despite rising feedstock
costs. An improvement in
the overall production position
coupled with the much-awaited
arrival of significant import
volumes was the main reason
for the downward price adjustment.
Demand was good
across most polymer classes.
The price picture, however,
varied widely between different
polymers and product types.
L/LDPE prices have fallen by
€115-125/tonne over the last
two months with HDPE down
€120-140/tonne. Meanwhile,
HDPE pipe grade prices have
increased slightly over the
same period.
In June, PP homopolymer
film and copolymer injection
prices increased €20/tonne
and homopolymer injection
prices remained stable. In
July, copolymer injection prices
fell by only €15-20/tonne
with homopolymer film and
homopolymer injection prices
falling €75-100/tonne.
Polystyrene prices have tumbled
€560/tonne over the last
two months following a sharp
reduction in styrene monomer
costs and improving availability.
PET prices have also continued
to fall steadily despite
rising raw material prices.
PVC remains the exception
with prices rising €130/tonne
over the last two months due
to ongoing supply tightness
and strong demand.
Supply shortage eases
The material shortages which
have contributed to record price
levels over recent months have
shown signs of easing over the
summer. Several feedstock and
polymer plants came back on
stream following planned or
unplanned outages. Significant
Prices Monitor July 2020 - July 2021
PET PVC LLDPE HDPELDPEPPPS
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
import volumes also started to
arrive from the US and Asia in
June to swell material availability.
Some of the plants returning
from disruptions were as follows;
*Shin-Etsu and Kem One declared
an end to the force majeure
for plants at Portuguese
subsidiary Cires and Berre
France, respectively, 22 July
*Shin-Etsu lifted force majeure
on PVC production at its
Netherlands site near Rotterdam
28 June
*A Unipetrol PP reactor in
Litvinov was shut down due to
" serious technical problems " 28
May and was restarted 30 June.
Unipetrol has also rectified the
problem at its PVC plant in Spolana,
Czech Republic
* Vestolit lifted the force majeure
for deliveries of PVC products
from its Marl, Germany
plant 15th June.
A number of unplanned plant
outages have also been announced
since June;
* The ExxonMobil ethylene
and propylene crackers in
France went offline 28 July
* Sabic announced a force
majeure for polyethylene at
Geleen, the Netherlands 28
July due to flooding on the
Maas river
* Vinnolit called force majeure
on PVC production in
Knapsack, Germany 20th July
due to flood damage
* Vinnolit also declared
force majeure on PVC from its
Burghausen and Gendorf sites
in Germany on 5 July due to operational
problems
* Total Petrochemicals called
force majeure on EPS at the Feluy,
Belgium plant 7 July
* Ineos declared force maPET
PVC
jeure
on several HDPE pipe
types 27 June due to an unexpected
technical problem
* Borealis declared force majeure
on plastomer production at
Geleen, the Netherlands 23 June
and also reported force majeure
on polyolefin production at Porvoo,
Finland 19 June due to a
technical malfunction.
LLDPE
HDPE
LDPE
PP
PS
Demand good
Demand for polymers, with the
exception of PET, was good
to very good over the last two
months despite the resurgence
of COVID-19 restrictions. Polymers
demand for building and
construction applications such
as PVC, HDPE pipe grade and
PS, was particularly strong.
August outlook
In view of the increase in feedstock
cost settlements, polymer
producers will call for higher
prices in August. However, an
improving supply position and
the holiday-related impact on
demand is likely to curtail any
such planned price increases.
August/September 20212020
31
Vinnolit's Knapsack
site, Germany

Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021

Contents
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover1
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover2
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Contents
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 4
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 5
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 6
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 7
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 8
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 9
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 10
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 11
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 12
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 13
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 14
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 15
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 16
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 17
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 18
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 19
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 20
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 21
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 22
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 23
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 24
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 25
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 26
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 27
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 28
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 29
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 30
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 31
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 32
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 33
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - 34
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover3
Sustainable Plastics - August/September 2021 - Cover4
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