Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 29

signers has evolved over time, as well, with speed to market driving the
project schedule. "Where before we'd have nine months to go through
the typical design process, to have a good set of drawings ... we now
sometimes shrink to two months. Time is money, and [clients] have to
get the shovels in the ground and get to market before the person down
the street," Maddalena says.
And thanks to the shift in expectations on the resident side, Maddalena
adds that he's found conversations with clients referencing hotels,
resorts, multifamily, retail, and other design genres that more holistically
represent the lifestyles people live today and expect to have in senior
housing. To that end, projects frequently must address the wants of all
generations, including the children who will be the next to move in and
the grandchildren who will be visiting. "You're really designing multigenerational spaces, no matter what the level of care," he says.
Overall, though, these trends capture a progressive sector of the
industry, with many organizations still relying on institutional approaches.
Causes for this include a lack of frontline staff exposure to new models of
care via education or site visits as well as leadership's inability at times to
move past roadblocks such as existing building and financial constraints
in order to enact change, says Rob Simonetti, senior associate and
design director for SWBR (Rochester, N.Y.). "Although we've made great
strides with person-centered care and implementation across the coun-

try, there are still so many folks who aren't there. I find myself needing
to come to the table as an advocate for change," he says.

Horizon line

NATHAN COX PHOTOGRAPHY

vehicles to provide a safe and
Submitted by toaccessible
SWBR
Architects
To create
pedestrian
environment
for community events such as
better connection
a new independent
farmersbetween
markets and art fairs.
Street-level amenities, open to
living option and
the greater
the surrounding
community,community,
include a bistro grill, garden
strategies of new
urbanism were employed
center, art studio, wellness center,
and a performing arts venue.
to achieve walkable
neighborhoods anchored
The inclusion of a lazy river
and water slide in the wellness
by a village square
with retail and social
center, a rooftop wine bar, and the
resident-operated garden center
gathering spaces
for residents and outside
reflect the unique qualities of Rose
Villa. With the completion of the
community members.
The neighborhood is
first phase updates, Rose Villa
revived its appealing, accessible
further connected
to the local town via an
garden setting, as the community
was originally conceived.
existing recreational
trail system.

[[RUN WITH
MIDDLE PHOTO
PAGE 71]]
ALISE O'BRIEN PHOTOGRAPHY

NATHAN COX PHOTOGRAPHY

2016

Brickstone
by St. John's

NATHAN COX PHOTOGRAPHY

2017
Rose Villa

NATHAN COX PHOTOGRAPHY

Environments for Aging * special supplement

71

Portland, Ore.

Rochester, N.Y.

[[RUN WITH MIDDLE
PHOTO, GATHERING
SPACE, PAGE 49]]

Project category: New construction
Chief administrator: Charlie Runyon, president and CEO; Joanne Braeunle,
corporate strategy officer, St. John's Senior Services
Firm: SWBR Architects (architect-of-record), www.swbr.com
Design team: Thomas R. Gears, AIA, principal; Frank DeLuca, AIA, project
architect; Jodi Mason, CID, interior designer; Mark Kluczynski, PE,
structural engineer (SWBR Architects); Tom Palumbo, managing senior
associate, civil engineer (Stantec); Chuck Sidoti, PE, project engineer (M/E
Engineering PC); Duncan Walker, AIA, design architect (previously with CSD
Architects)
Photography: © David Lamb Photography
Number/type of housing units: 102 independent living (40 apartments,
nine townhomes, 53 bungalows)
Total building area (sq. ft.): 99,200 (Phase 1), 116,997 (Phase 2)
Construction cost/sq. ft.: $132 (Phase 1), $105 (Phase 2)
Total construction cost (excluding land): $13.1 million (Phase 1),
$12.3 million (Phase 2)

Submitted by RLPS Architects and
MGA Architects To solve declining
occupancy, this garden community
was reimagined with the introduction
of cottage homes organized in pocket
neighborhoods overlooking intimate
courtyards, each stepping down the
site's hillside to create a pedestrianfriendly terrain. At the top of the hill
is a new Main Street with retail and
amenities spaces at ground level, with
loft apartments on floors above.

Despite the ongoing evolution from institutional to person-centered
care, trends indicate more change to come. For starters, concepts of
walkable, urban communities are gaining a lot of traction. Aside from
the appeal the model has with baby boomers, there's also a very
conventional reason to pursue it: existing infrastructure. "The restaurants, the bistros, the cafés-that's already in downtowns and it's
done as well as it can possibly be done. Theaters are there, art galleries are there," McRoberts says. "Many CCRCs try to recreate that,
but are you going to be able to do it as well? Probably not. ...Those
are the things you may no longer need to build in a community. I think
that makes it a lot more manageable from a financial standpoint."
Additional indicators point toward current practices of segregating individuals by age going to the wayside, replaced by more
progressive approaches like multigenerational housing. "Clustering
people by age or general care needs alone has been a convenience
that will no longer be acceptable by the coming consumer," says
CC Andrews, president and chief strategist at Quantum Age Collaborative (Cleveland), adding that she anticipates even more emerging
models, such as senior living around affinity groups (alma maters,
professions, special interests). "Affordability, too, is going to be a
huge issue going forward. The boomers, for example, have saved
less than any generation before them, so new, less costly models
will emerge just out of necessity."
David Banta, director of senior living for WDG Architecture PLLC
(Washington, D.C.), adds that residents today are living longer and
are remaining actively engaged in their professions, volunteering in
communities, sitting on boards, and consulting. "How do we allow
them to get out and go to work or work from home?" he says. At
the same time, there's a larger population of individuals living longer
with chronic illness, and the senior living industry will be "continually challenged to focus not just on care and safety, but to provide
progressive supports that empower individuals to live self-directed,
enriching lives," Andrews adds.
EFA's board members say it will be critical to better support seniors
in the greater community, as well, from elder-friendly healthcare spaces in clinics and hospitals to neighborhoods that support the growing
population of individuals aging with dementia. "We still have some
fairly significant ageism, prejudice against older adults in our society,
and how we as a culture go about trying to change that so that we
recognize the gifts and benefits that come with aging, and not just the
deficits, is something people don't want to face," Calkins says.
But with millions of aging boomers and intergenerational and
urban models emerging, the silos society has grown accustomed
to may be absent from the next wave of senior living design. "It's
breaking down all the barriers we've previously had and cleaning
the slate," Rohde says. EFA
Jennifer Kovacs Silvis is editor-in-chief of Environments for Aging. She can
be reached at jennifer.silvis@emeraldexpo.com.
Fall 2017 * EFAmagazine.com

29


http://www.swbr.com http://www.EFAmagazine.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Environments for Aging - Fall 2017

Environments for Aging - Fall 2017
Contents
EFAmagazine.com
Editorial
Editorial Advisory Board
Show Talk
Bulletin
Welcome
High score
Now and then
Setting the stage
Close to home
Open house
All inclusive
Top 10 Remodel/ Renovation projects
Introduction
Product Innovation Awards winners
Product Innovation Gallery
Design Profiles
Q+A
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Environments for Aging - Fall 2017
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Cover2
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 1
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Contents
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 3
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - EFAmagazine.com
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 5
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 6
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Editorial
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 8
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 9
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Editorial Advisory Board
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 11
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Show Talk
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 13
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 14
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Bulletin
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 16
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 17
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 18
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 19
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 20
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 21
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Welcome
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 23
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Now and then
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 25
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 26
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 27
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 28
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 29
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 30
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 31
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 32
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Setting the stage
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 34
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 35
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Close to home
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 37
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 38
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 39
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 40
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 41
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 42
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 43
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 44
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 45
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Open house
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 47
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 48
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 49
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 50
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 51
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - All inclusive
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 53
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Top 10 Remodel/ Renovation projects
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 55
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 56
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 57
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 58
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 59
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 60
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 61
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 62
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 63
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 64
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 65
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 66
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Introduction
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Product Innovation Awards winners
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 69
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 70
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Product Innovation Gallery
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 72
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 73
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Design Profiles
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 75
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 76
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 77
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 78
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - 79
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Q+A
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Cover3
Environments for Aging - Fall 2017 - Cover4
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