The Main Course - Jan - Apr 2012 (Spring 2012) - (Page 1)

recreational classes p9 career classes p2 50 West 23rd Street . New York, NY 10010 TEL 212.847.0700 FAX 212.847.0722 iceculinary.com contents career division Program Overview Frequently Asked Questions Culinary Arts Diploma Program Pastry Arts Diploma Program Culinary Management Diploma Program Hospitality Management Diploma; Alumni News Demonstrations; CAPS@ICE 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 recreational division Program Overview 9 Professional Development; People of ICE 10 Center for Food Media 11 Techniques of Cooking 12 Basics; All About Technique; Knife Skills 14 The Essential Cuisines 15 Meat & Poultry 16 Steakhouse; Key Ingredient; Fish & Seafood 17 American; Surf and Turf 18 American Regional Favorites; The Vegetable Plate 19 All About Technique; ICE on Location; Everyone Cooks Everything 20 Latin; Italian; Soups, Stocks & Sauces 21 Italian cont’d 22 Asian; Historical Cooking; ICE á la Minute 23 French; Culinary Tours; Private Cooking Parties 24 Healthful; Other World Flavors; ICE Entertaining 25 Techniques of Pastry & Baking 26 Cake Decorating; Cookie Design; Gluten-Free 27 Pastry & Baking Specialty Courses 28 Pastry & Baking cont’d; Bread 29 Center for Wine Studies 30 Wine & Food; Beer; Spirits 31 Couples 32 Kids & Teens; Family; Sugar; Chocolate 33 Valentine’s Day; Entertaining 34 Interviews cont’d 35 Calendar 36–39 Walking Tours back jan–apr 2012 v21 no1 themaincourse The Institute of Culinary Education Sous-Vide Cooking Spreads Through Kitchens, at ICE Long the domain of a few select chefs, sous-vide cooking is now making itself at home in kitchens around the country—those of professionals and home cooks alike, thanks in no small part to the proliferation of appliances allowing for the process. The teaching kitchens of the Institute of Culinary Education are no exception. “The goal of using sous-vide systems is to capture food at its peak and preserve it at that state,” explained Chef-Instructor James Briscione. “Chicken, for example, is at its best the day it comes in the door; the sooner it is cooked or processed, the lower the risk of spoilage or decline in quality.” Sous vide, which means “under vacuum” but more accurately refers to the absence of air in the cooking process, was first developed in the 1970s in France. Three parts are essential to sous vide cooking: the absence of air; temperature; and time. Removing the air is typically done by vacuuming it out. Temperature refers to that of the water in which the bag is immersed once sealed, below sim-mering. Time is less critical in sous vide than in traditional cooking, since food that reaches the desired temperature will never go above it, no matter how long it stays in the water. That said, spending too long in a water bath can affect the texture of certain ingredients. The apparatus most commonly associated with sous-vide cooking is a temperature-controlled water bath. Professionals typically use an external thermal circulator clipped to a pot or container; that circulator is inside the countertop sous-vide appliances for home cooks, which have become more widely available since the release of the SousVide Supreme in 2010. Whether in plain sight or not, that technology ensures that the water circulates and is kept at a constant temperature. Before going into the water bath, meat, seafood, vegetables, or fruits are placed inside a heat-resistant plastic bag with a liquid, herbs, or fats to add flavor. In most applications, the air is then removed from the bag and the sealed bag is placed in a heating environment (a water bath, steam-er, or combi oven, for example), in which it will cook at a constant temperature for a given period of time. Varying temperature by just two to three degrees Celsius can result in widely differing results. Once the air is removed from the continued on page 35 Newsletter and Schedule of Courses An Interview with Mark Bittman M Special Guests at ICE Anita Lo p. 23 Michael Laiskonis p.8 ark Bittman is the lead food writer for the New York Times Magazine and an opinion columnist for the New York Times, for which he began writing in 1990. Before his current duties, he authored the weekly “The Minimalist” column for the newspaper, launched in 1997. His opus, How to Cook Everything, has sold more than 1 million copies. He is also the author of How to Cook Everything: Vegetarian, Food Matters, The Food Matters Cookbook, The Minimalist Cooks Dinner, and a slew of other books, including the upcoming How to Cook Everything: The Basics (March 2012), which contains 1000 photographs to accompany stepby-step instructions for everything one needs to cook, including how to boil water. He has won several awards from the James Beard Foundation and the International Association of Culinary Professionals for his writing and his television series, Bittman Takes on America’s Chefs. He frequently appears on The Today Show, and was the host of PBS’s Spain: On the Road Again with Mario Batali and Gwyneth Paltrow. The Main Course met with him at the New York Times to gain his perspective on today’s food world and the changes required to our food system. Michael Pollan recently anointed you one of the most powerful voices in food—one of seven. What does that mean to you? Obviously, I was honored to be on the list, though it is after all just a list. I would have put together a different list if someone had asked me to do it, but Michael knows a huge number of people in the food world, he’s really a central figure, and that makes his his choices meaningful. Obviously, you’d rather be on a list like that than not. So it was great. How do you think you ended up on a list like that? I think it’s the [New York] Times. I like to think that How to Cook Everything has been an influential book, and it would be falsely modest to say it hasn’t been. But I’m the only regularly -appearing opinion writer in a major newspaper in the United States writing pretty much exclusively about food, and as it happens, the paper that I’m doing it for—it’s not a coincidence—is the most important paper in the country and one of the most important papers in the world. So it’s as much about the platform as it is about me. Again, it would be falsely modest to say I didn’t work hard to get here, and I lobbied for this position and got it. I’ve been lucky; I’ve worked hard; I’ve been in the right place. Those are three of the things that make you successful: hard work, being in the right place, luck. continued on page 35 ICE: à la Minute Ivy Stark p. 21 Daniel Holtzman p.17 p.23 Shorter classes, to fit your schedule! Calendar Listing p.36 Day-by-day class schedule! http://www.iceculinary.com http://www.iceculinary.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Main Course - Jan - Apr 2012 (Spring 2012)

The Main Course - Jan-Apr 2012
Contents
Program Overview
Frequently Asked Questions
Culinary Arts Diploma Program
Pastry Arts Diploma Program
Culinary Management Diploma Program
Hospitality Management Diploma; Alumni News
Demonstrations; CAPS@ICE
Program Overview
Professional Development; People of ICE
Center for Food Media
Techniques of Cooking
Basics; All About Technique; Knife Skills
The Essential Cuisines
Meat & Poultry
Steakhouse; Key Ingredient; Fish & Seafood
American; Surf and Turf
American Regional Favorites; The Vegetable Plate
All About Technique; ICE on Location; Everyone Cooks Everything
Latin; Italian; Soups, Stocks & Sauces
Italian cont’d
Asian; Historical Cooking; ICE á la Minute
French; Culinary Tours; Private Cooking Parties
Healthful; Other World Flavors; ICE Entertaining
Techniques of Pastry & Baking
Cake Decorating; Cookie Design; Gluten-Free
Pastry & Baking Specialty Courses
Pastry & Baking cont’d; Bread
Center for Wine Studies
Wine & Food; Beer; Spirits
Couples
Kids & Teens; Family; Sugar; Chocolate
Valentine’s Day; Entertaining
Interviews cont’d
Calendar
Walking Tours

The Main Course - Jan - Apr 2012 (Spring 2012)

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