The Main Course - May - Sept 2012 (Summer 2012) - (Page 1)

recreational classes p9 career classes p2 50 West 23rd Street . New York, NY 10010 TEL 212.847.0700 FAX 212.847.0722 iceculinary.com contents career division Program Overview Frequently Asked Questions Culinary Arts Diploma Program Pastry Arts Diploma Program Culinary Management Diploma Program Hospitality Management Diploma; Alumni News Demonstrations; CAPS@ICE Classes with Chef Michael Laiskonis 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 recreational division Center for Food Media; Article cont’d 10 Professional Development; People of ICE 11 Program Overview 12 Basics; Knife Skills 13 Techniques of Cooking 14-15 Meat & Poultry 16 American; Steakhouse; Everyone Cooks Everything 17 Fish & Seafood; Surf & Turf 18 All About Technique; Key Ingredient; ICE on Location 19 American Regional Favorites; The Greenmarket; Soups, Stocks & Salads 20 Italian; ICE á la Minute 21 Latin; Historical Fine Dining; Meatless Mondays 22 The Essential Cuisines 23 French; International Cooking Trips; Private Hands-On Cooking Parties 24 ICE Entertaining; Healthful; Cheese; Casa Mono Food & Wine Pairings 25 Asian; Ice Boot Camp 26 Other World Flavors; Interview cont’d 27 Techniques of Pastry & Baking 28 Cake Decorating; Pastry & Baking 29 Pastry & Baking cont’d; Sugar 30 Pastry & Baking cont’d; Macarons; Bread 31 Pastry & Baking cont’d; Gluten Free; Chocolate 32 Entertaining; Interview cont’d 33 Couples 34 Family; Kids; Staff 35 Center for Wine Studies 36 Beer; Cocktails & Spirits Wine & Food Pairings 37 Calendar 38–39 Walking Tours back cover may–sept 2012 v21 no2 themaincourse The Institute of Culinary Education You Say Cebiche, and I Say Ceviche: An Interview with Newsletter and Schedule of Courses Peru’s Beloved Dish Walk down any street in Lima and you are sure to come across ceviche – raw fish or seafood that has been ‘cooked’ in citrus juices. This popular food, also spelled seviche or cebiche, is Peru’s national dish and Latin America’s answer to sushi. Much like the sushi bars that dominate Tokyo, today there are over 2,000 cevicherias in Lima alone. Ceviche is native to Peru, but its origins are up for debate. Some purport ceviche dates back to the fourteenth century during the time of the Incas who had inhabited the land for hundreds of years. In order to preserve their daily catch, the Incans used available citrus fruits and salt. However, according to Linda Civitello author of Cuisine and Culture: A History of Food and People, it wasn’t until the Spanish conquistadors arrived that this raw dish was born. That was nearly two hundred years later in 1532 when Francisco Pizzaro and his troops, with permission from the Spanish Monarchy, arrived to conquer the Americas. From 1540 to 1550 they brought foods from Spain and cultivated them in Peru’s soil. Grape vines, olive tree cuttings, figs, pomegranates, wheat, coconuts, and citrus fruits among other foods were planted. The third belief is that ceviche came with the wave of Japanese immigration, which began in 1899. Once in Peru, the Japanese adapted their traditional sashimi to include local ingredients and flavors. Today that storied and yet simple dish can be found on menus all over South America, on Mexico’s Pacific Coast, in the Yucatan Peninsula, on the islands of the Caribbean, up the Eastern seaboard and all the way to the concrete jungle that is New York City. Like any other traditional dish this one has been modified and modernized over time, but at its core the process for making ceviche remains the same. While many consider this prepared fish to be cooked in the acidic citrus juices, in fact, it is not. Michael Schwartz, ICE Chef-Instructor and owner of BAO Food and Drink explains, “Ceviche is basically denaturing the protein so it looks opaque or cooked.” To denature, in culinary terms, is to change the appearance and the texture. In this case, the denaturing process effects the fish in such a way that it has the appearance of being cooked. “However, it is much more tender then if you were to cook it,” says Schwartz. continued on page 10 Chef April Bloomfield B ritish-born chef April Bloomfield has been credited with starting the “gastropub revolution” in New York City. How long was your cookbook in the making? It was a whole year to write it, to test recipes, and tell the stories. It was a great experience and working with JJ [Goode] was amazing. He’s such a good writer, very talen-ted, and we worked well together. In the Foreword to the book JJ referred to you as “vegetable savant.” What do you think about that? Did he? That’s a good thing … I think. I love cooking vegetables. They’re just fun to cook and they’re so versatile. We’re planning on doing a vegetable book together, which is very exciting. How difficult was it to translate your restaurant’s recipes for a home cook? It took a second because I’d never done it before and I was doing a process that I thought was quite natural and then it didn’t quite work out. I thought, “This is going to take forever.” So what I had to do was just scratch what I’d just done then restart. I wrote the ingredients down, but without putting weights and measures in, and then I wrote the method. I used an iPad so it was really efficient. Then I created the recipes and I had time to write little notes about why continued on page 27 She and restaurateur Ken Friedman launched The Spotted Pig in February of 2004 and since then, the eatery has earned one star from the Michelin Guide for six consecutive years. In 2010, the duo expanded their restaurant empire inside the Ace Hotel first with The Breslin Bar & Dining Room, and later with the John Dory Oyster Bar, which earned a glowing two-star review from The New York Times. Bloomfield accidentally fell into her career after missing an examination to begin training as a police officer. Instead, she followed in her sister’s footsteps to cookery school at Birmingham College and eventually went on to cook at London’s acclaimed River Café. Under the guidance of Ruth Rogers and Rose Gray, Bloomfield learned that good ingredients speak for themselves. Nearly a decade after leaving her mentors, her first cookbook, A Girl and Her Pig hit shelves in April 2012. The Main Course met with Bloomfield upstairs at The Breslin to discuss her book endeavor, her thoughts on being a chef and restaurateur, and that oh-sofamous burger. Special Guests at ICE Eileen Yin-Fei Lo p. 8 Shawn Gawle p. 29 Greenmarket Classes Surbhi Sahni p. 27 Gabe Thompson p. 21 page 20 ICE á la Minute page 21 ICE Boot Camp page 26 http://www.iceculinary.com http://www.iceculinary.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Main Course - May - Sept 2012 (Summer 2012)

The Main Course - May - Sept 2012 (Summer 2012)
Program Overview
Frequently Asked Questions
Culinary Arts Diploma Program
Pastry Arts Diploma Program
Culinary Management Diploma Program
Hospitality Management Diploma; Alumni News
Demonstrations; CAPS@ICE
Classes with Chef Michael Laiskonis
Center for Food Media; Article cont’d
Professional Development; People of ICE
Program Overview
Basics; Knife Skills
Techniques of Cooking
Meat & Poultry
American; Steakhouse; Everyone Cooks Everything
Fish & Seafood; Surf & Turf
All About Technique; Key Ingredient; ICE on Location
American Regional Favorites; The Greenmarket; Soups, Stocks & Salads
Italian; ICE á la Minute
Latin; Historical Fine Dining; Meatless Mondays
The Essential Cuisines
French; International Cooking Trips; Private Hands-On Cooking Parties
ICE Entertaining; Healthful; Cheese; Casa Mono Food & Wine Pairings
Asian; Ice Boot Camp
Other World Flavors; Interview cont’d
Techniques of Pastry & Baking
Cake Decorating; Pastry & Baking
Pastry & Baking cont’d; Sugar
Pastry & Baking cont’d; Macarons; Bread
Pastry & Baking cont’d; Gluten Free; Chocolate
Entertaining; Interview cont’d
Couples
Family; Kids; Staff
Center for Wine Studies
Beer; Cocktails & Spirits Wine & Food Pairings
Calendar
Walking Tours

The Main Course - May - Sept 2012 (Summer 2012)

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