The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 2

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Greetings!

One NYC Patisserie: Five ICE Alumni

ICE has an information-rich content platform that
we call "Diced," edited by our Content Director
Ashley Day. Below are two interesting alumni stories excerpted from the blog.

Macaron Parlour is a New York City pastry business where the whole staff
is women who graduated from ICE. The head baker is Christina Ha
(Pastry, '10/Management, '11), who was a weekend student at ICE and
co-founded the business with her husband, fellow ICE alum, Simon Tung
(Management, '11).
The pastry boutique, which has two locations, is well-known for
character macarons in fun shapes like ladybugs and unicorns. The team
also makes incredible croissants and scones in flavors like black tea and
orange zest, honey lavender and savory thyme.
As far as the all-ICE-graduates-and-all-female kitchen, Christina says
it was kismet. "It just happened naturally," she explained. "We've been
open for a while and hiring for seven years so I have had people from
basically everywhere, but with this group it just clicked." The team under
Christina comprises Karla Francois (Pastry, '12), Alexa Ventura
(Pastry/Management, '19) and Lauren Kujawa (Pastry, '14).
"I wanted everyone to have a rounded experience and be able to jump
in on all tasks. Everyone has been able to create new product and
everyone is able to make macarons," Christina said, adding that it's the
first time that her kitchen has run so smoothly.
"I've had so many talented people work for us, but this is the first time
that we've been this efficient and on the same wavelength," she said.
"We're not all the same age and we didn't go to ICE at the same time -
there's close to a 20-year age gap between all of us - but we get along
really well and we have the same values."
When it comes to kitchen hiring and retention, Macaron Parlour has
found the recipe for success!
Cheers, Rick Smilow
ICE President & CEO

ICE Student Amanda Lee Wins
Umami Competition
On Nov. 8, Culinary Arts student Amanda Lee won
the United States of Unami Culinary Competition
hosted by the World Umami Forum and
Ajinomoto Company Inc. in Charleston, South Carolina. She was
awarded an all-expenses paid, eight-day culinary trip to Japan in 2020.
Contestants were challenged with developing first and main courses, one
of which was plant-based and one that represented each student's
heritage. Graded on flavor enhancement, balance, understanding of
umami and technical ability. Amanda trained at ICE with Director of
Culinary Research and Development Barry Tonkinson to refine her
dishes, timing and craftsmanship.
Her heritage dish was glazed duck, burnt onion, fuyu persimmon jam,
marinated daikon, fried watercress and watercress oil. The plant-based
dish was roasted spaghetti squash, charred eggplant and miso puree, coal
grilled oyster mushroom and shiso gremolata. Both came together
naturally for Amanda because she saw them as "coming from her heart."
"My heritage-based appetizer is an elevated, grown-up bite of my
childhood food memories and Chinese-Korean background," she said. "I
featured my parents' favorite foods, duck and persimmon, and layered
them with my own umami-rich favorites that I grew up with: watercress,
daikon and shiitake."

What to Expect from Your First Job After ICE
by Timothy Cooper

TABLE OF
CONTENTS
CAREER DIVISION
Program Overview
Frequently Asked Questions
Culinary Arts Program
Pastry & Baking Arts Program
Health-Supportive Culinary Arts
Culinary Management Program
Hospitality Management Program
Bread Baking
Cake Decorating
Demonstrations; First Fridays
CAPS@ICE
Classes with Michael Laiskonis

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
11
12
13
13

RECREATIONAL DIVISION
Food Media
Culinary Management & Business
Beverage Management Program
Program Overview
Knife Skills; Technique
Techniques of Cooking
Butcher Block; Meat & Poultry
Fish & Seafood; Surf & Turf
American; Basics
Ingredient Focused
Italian; Pasta; Pizza
Latin
French; Asian; Alumni News
The Essential Cuisines
International; Holiday
Brunch & Entertaining
Health-Supportive
Vegan & Gluten-Free
Couples' Cooking
Kids, Teens & Family; Camps
Techniques of Pastry & Baking
Cake Decorating
Pastry & Baking; Chocolate
Bread; Sugar; Macarons
Wine; Wine & Food Pairing
Essentials of Wine; Mixology
Beverages; Professional Mixology
Calendar

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We interviewed Institute of Culinary Education graduates about their
first professional jobs after completing their studies. Did they feel prepared? Were they surprised by the workload? Did they get to
contribute creatively in their roles? What were their best and worst
days like?
Here's what entering the world of professional hospitality entails -
directly from the alumni who did it!

my work for the past eight months had been worth it."
George's best day at The Benjamin was his first day: "When I was
walking up to the lobby desk, the concierge popped her head up from
her computer and welcomed me with a giant smile," he recalls. "Her
enthusiasm - in addition to the happy team I work with at the front
desk - make every day wonderful. My worst day hasn't happened yet!"

HOW ICE PREPARES YOU

Worst days and first days aren't always mutually exclusive. For
example, Johannes' first task on his first day was to cook a sheet tray
of bacon: "I burned it," he laments. "But my boss, Chef Kevin, is a great
mentor; when someone told him this had happened, he just replied,
'We are a team' - and made me do it again."
Daniel says, "My worst day ever at Atera was when the walk-in
freezer went down in the middle of the night. I walked in the next
morning to find out a week's worth of my mise en place had melted
(ice creams, hand-folded ice cream mochi, sorbet discs dipped in cocoa
butter, granitas). I cried in the bathroom."
Eli recalls his worst day when he'd just started working canapé:
"My station teammate was sick, and the replacement was a more senior cook who is quite a few stations ahead of me," he says. "He completed every task so quickly; during service, he didn't even need me.
He basically did two people's jobs by himself without breaking a sweat.
I left work that day humiliated, but also very motivated to get better."

For Johannes Botha (Culinary, '19) ICE provided a vast, general
knowledge of the culinary world that he applies to his work every
single day: "Could I have learned what I do now by working? Maybe,
but my prospects for moving up would have been very slow." After
working in the fashion industry for decades, Johannes started his
second career by enrolling at ICE. Upon graduating, he received an
internship offer from The Walpack Inn, a traditional American
restaurant in New Jersey, where he now works full-time.
Similarly, Adam Carbone (Pastry, '19) says, "ICE gave me a working
language to communicate with other culinary professionals (this
process develops gluten, that step produces steam, this practice is
unsanitary, etc.). I don't think I personally could have broken into the
industry on my own, which made the externship program the main
selling point of the school for me."
Daniel Kan (Culinary, '18) is a chef de partie at Le Jardinier by Joël
Robuchon in Miami. He fulfilled his three-month externship at Atera
in Tribeca, worked there for another year, and then moved back down
to Miami to work at the newly opened Le Jardinier. Kan says, "ICE
gave me the fundamental knowledge needed to understand new
techniques in the kitchen. The school's name gave me the
opportunity to be able to work in a two-Michelin-starred restaurant."
George Tsaoussis Carter (Hospitality, '19) is a guest services agent
at The Benjamin hotel in NYC. Hotels are his "second act," after he
worked for 15 years directing and managing art fairs. George reflects,
"I wouldn't have been able to so easily slip into my new role and
complete the new training with ease had I not first worked at The
Dylan as my externship through ICE."
Prior to her journey into the culinary world, Victoria Vilardi
(Pastry/Management, '17) worked in administrative health care. Like
many, she had an aha! moment when she realized she needed to follow
her passion and enrolled at ICE within a few weeks. Now she's the
pastry sous chef at Del Posto (where she also did her externship), as
well as the pastry chef for a private company called 99th Floor. "Like
others at ICE, we have the luxury of what we do hardly feeling like
work - it is our hobbies turned into dream jobs. Suddenly, cranking
a 12-hour day was as easy as taking a deep breath. The pace becomes
synonymous with your being.

SURPRISES ON YOUR FIRST DAY
Adam Carbone (Pastry, '19) is a pastry cook at The Fulton - a new
seafood restaurant from Jean-Georges Vongerichten at Manhattan's
South Street Seaport. After ICE, Adam externed at Jean-Georges'
flagship, eponymous restaurant in Columbus Circle, which led to being
part of the opening team at this new concept. He says his first day was
"a bit frightening."
"I had a career before this one, so it wasn't the same sort of 'Oh no,
I'm an adult now' jitters, but it was the first job that was in the career
I'd chosen," Adam explains.
Likewise, Victoria's recollections of her initial experience reflect a
common refrain: "The first days, weeks and months were all an
overload, but in the best way," she says. "I was excited, anxious and
overwhelmed - but overall, I was grateful for these new experiences.
What did surprise me mentally and physically were the hours
demanded to thrive in this industry."
Eli Gitelman (Culinary, '19) is a chef de partie at Restaurant Daniel,
where he also did his externship as an ICE student. A computer
science major in college, he realized that "the best chefs are first and
foremost masters of organization. At Daniel you must do everything
in one shot and cleanly. No redos, no time to clean up a mess - it must
be perfect every time."

BEST DAY ON THE JOB
Daniel remembers his best days as when he was promoted twice in a
year. "I went from pastry cook to cold apps and vegetables during prep,
and from garde manger to vegetable/sauce cook during service hours,"
he says.
Eli says, "My best day was getting promoted to canapé. It felt like

...AND WORST DAY ON THE JOB

CONTRIBUTING TO THE CREATIVE PROCESS
Typically newcomers to a workplace find themselves in a learning role
rather than being in a position to contribute to creative or business
decisions. Is this always true?
Not according to Johannes: "I continuously have chances to speak
to Chef Kevin about food and ideas," he says of The Walpack Inn. "I
have experienced him taking something I did and turning it into
something spectacular."
Adam didn't have so many opportunities: "I wasn't given much
creative input, although I was occasionally asked my opinion," he says.
"That's fine with me, as it seems sensible to ask that a new hire prove
their ability to manifest their ideas in the real world before they have
input or give others orders."
As someone who hires chefs, Victoria makes it a point to learn from
everyone: "Whenever I hire someone new at work, I'm always
interested to know his or her background. I have cooks now who were
math teachers, EMTs, travel writers or computer programmers.
Everyone has something they can bring to the table. If the leaders
aren't getting input from the fresh minds in the kitchen, their tunnel
vision will be their own demise."

TIPS & TRICKS YOU LEARNED ON THE JOB
We asked for grads' top piece of advice to others who aspire to work in
a professional venue.
Adam sagely offers, "If you're trying to prove your inner value, you'll
fall apart because every critique feels like an attack on your character.
But if you're trying to get better over time, criticism is a gift."
Johannes advises, "If you do a bad prep, you will fail during service.
So keep your station clean, anticipate what you will need 30 minutes
from now, and start working on it."
Eli offers, "Watch and listen to what other people get in trouble for
and then don't do those things. You don't have to learn every lesson
yourself."
Daniel says, "Remember your reason for starting this line of work.
Work hard, humble yourself and always be willing to learn because no
one knows everything. Be nice to everyone and everyone will be nice
to you."
George echoes Eli's advice: "Always smile when answering the
phone - it changes the way you interact with the guest, and the public
in the lobby will see the kindness in your face, which will enhance their
day and their stay."
Victoria recommends, "Write everything down! You are getting so
much information all the time, whether it be a new mixing method,
dishes changing on the menu or items your chefs are researching and
developing. Never lose your eagerness to learn and grow - and always
make sure to set some time aside for yourself."
Every student experience at ICE is unique and reflects the student's
individual background, experience and talent. The experience of particular
students illustrated here may differ from your own.



The Main Course - Winter 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Main Course - Winter 2020

Program Overview
Frequently Asked Questions
Culinary Arts Program
Pastry & Baking Arts Program
Health-Supportive Culinary Arts
Culinary Management Program
Hospitality Management Program
Bread Baking
Cake Decorating
Demonstrations; First Fridays
CAPS@ICE
Classes with Michael Laiskonis
Food Media
Culinary Management & Business
Beverage Management Program
Program Overview
Knife Skills; Technique
Techniques of Cooking
Butcher Block; Meat & Poultry
Fish & Seafood; Surf & Turf
American; Basics
Ingredient Focused
Italian; Pasta; Pizza
Latin
French; Asian; Alumni News
The Essential Cuisines
International; Holiday
Brunch & Entertaining
Health-Supportive
Vegan & Gluten-Free
Couples´ Cooking
Techniques of Pastry & Baking
Cake Decorating
Pastry & Baking; Chocolate
Bread; Sugar; Macarons
Wine; Wine & Food Pairing
Essentials of Wine; Mixology
Beverages; Professional Mixology
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Cover1
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 2
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 3
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Program Overview
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Frequently Asked Questions
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Culinary Arts Program
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Pastry & Baking Arts Program
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Health-Supportive Culinary Arts
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Culinary Management Program
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Hospitality Management Program
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Cake Decorating
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Demonstrations; First Fridays
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Classes with Michael Laiskonis
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Culinary Management & Business
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Beverage Management Program
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Program Overview
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Knife Skills; Technique
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Techniques of Cooking
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 19
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Butcher Block; Meat & Poultry
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Fish & Seafood; Surf & Turf
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - American; Basics
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Ingredient Focused
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Italian; Pasta; Pizza
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Latin
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - French; Asian; Alumni News
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - The Essential Cuisines
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - International; Holiday
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Brunch & Entertaining
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Health-Supportive
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Vegan & Gluten-Free
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 32
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Couples´ Cooking
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Techniques of Pastry & Baking
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Cake Decorating
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Pastry & Baking; Chocolate
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Bread; Sugar; Macarons
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Wine; Wine & Food Pairing
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Essentials of Wine; Mixology
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Beverages; Professional Mixology
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 41
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 42
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - 43
The Main Course - Winter 2020 - Cover4
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