Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 27

central bank scorecards this year – were too high. Mexico decided to sell half of its accumulation back to the market, to save money, for which it was commended at the time. Brazil, however, needed the hefty reserves during the crisis, while Mexico had to access swap lines from the US Fed and the IMF. “Brazil’s decision had been criticized, but at the end of the day it seems to have been the right decision,” says Heath. Few have criticized Banco Central’s rate moves, which left room for an additional cut in late July to 8.75%, the lowest ever, after which many analysts were expecting a pause. But while Brazil’s non-monetary policy moves have received praise, some analysts wanted more openness. There was a lack of transparency around the use of nonconventional FX tools, says Nick Chamie, head of emerging markets research at RBC. When Brazil used FX swaps, it was unclear what risks that imposed on the Remarkable results: Brazil’s Meirelles central bank’s balance sheet, he adds. The central bank made several announcements regarding its use of FX reserves to fund loans to the corporate sector. At the time it was unclear if the bank could include those loans as part of FX reserves and what the credit quality was, Chamie says. “There were quite a few off-market policy measures taking place during the crisis that helped mitigate some of the pressures, but it also seemed they weren’t making it completely clear as to how they were going to be accounting for those,” Chamie says. “They came through it fine, but they didn’t always manage the process in the right way.” Chile finished a close second to Brazil, with many seeing its central bank as having the most to do during the crisis period. Chilean inflation rose and fell more than in Brazil and Mexico during the crisis. Banco Central de Chile started from a much better point, seeing monthly inflation data – measured as an annual change on the consumer price index –below 3.0% in the first half of 2007. However, it rose as high as 9.5% in June and July 2008, returning to 1.9% in June 2009. A period of dry weather shocked both the food and energy markets. Chile began to raise rates in July 2008, which some say was too late given that inflation was rising, hitting a peak of 8.25% in December. It cut to 0.50% in July, compared to 6.75% in July 2008, and now finds itself battling deflation. Mexico is the hardest for experts to agree on. It comes fourth overall, despite many ranking it third. The country takes criticism for having inflation that declines less than others’ in the region. At 5.74% as of June, it has come down from a peak of 6.53% in December. However, it also rose less than others during the crisis period, reaching 5.57% in August 2008 after starting the year at 3.70%. Like Brazil, Mexico produces enough of its own to make inflation less of a struggle than in a country like Chile, which imports a lot more consumer goods. Both Mexico and Brazil were also aided by currencies that were appreciating through most of this year, unlike others in the region. “Mexico is the one exception [among the region’s economies], where it suffered most from external shocks and delivered the least monetary stimulus,” explains Morden. The constraint for Mexico has been that inflation remains quite sticky and remains above trend.” She says this detracts from its ability to focus on growth, and Mexico is looking at the worst growth in the region. Some also criticize Mexico for not cutting rates sooner. After holding at 7.50% for the first half of the year, it raised to 8.25% by August 2008 and held until November, before cutting down to 4.75% by June. The high-stakes circumstances of the crisis also reiterate calls for Banxico to publish its minutes, as Brazil and the US Federal Reserve do. “I think the central bank in Mexico has done quite a good job,” says Heath. He attributes the worries with Mexico to structural vulnerabilities, such as lower Close second: Chile’s de Gregorio oil production and the need for fiscal, tax and energy reform, are surfacing. Though inflation has remained higher than the central bank’s band of 2%-4%, this is mostly due to outside factors rather than monetary policy, Heath says. Going forward, Banxico will need to pay more attention to inflation risk, Bank of America-Merrill Lynch says, which could limit its ability to focus on growth. The central banks of Peru and Colombia are considered to have slightly less of an influence on their economies than Brazil, Chile and Mexico. “Peru and Colombia are a little more interventionist,” says Heath. “Exchange rates in Brazil, Chile and Mexico are much closer to free-floating exchange rates, whereas Peru and Colombia are inclined to step in and make sure there is a little less volatility.” The strength of Colombia’s resistance to the credit crisis, including thriving local credit markets and a strong banking system, seem to have rubbed off on the Banco de la Republica’s image, as it found its way past the more controversial Mexico to number three on the list. Inflation fell to 3.81% as of June, from a high of 7.94% in October, and the peso was at 1,954 per US dollar, its lowest since September 2008. LF September/October 2009 LatinFinance 27

Latin Finance - September/October 2009

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Latin Finance - September/October 2009

Latin Finance - September/October 2009
Contents
Investment Banking Survey
Who Said That?
OTPP Investment Strategy
Central Bank Scorecards
Brazil Liability Management
Real Estate Equity Resurrected
Structured Finance Forecasts
Grim Outlook. Reform Required
Banorte Seeks to Grow
Peru Spending Hits a Block
BCP Sees Better Days
Caribbean Investment Report
Sustainable Banking
Legal Services Survey
Parting Shot
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Latin Finance - September/October 2009
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Cover2
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Contents
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 2
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 3
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 4
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 5
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 6
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 7
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 8
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 9
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 10
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 11
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 12
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 13
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Investment Banking Survey
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Who Said That?
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 16
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 17
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 18
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 19
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 20
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 21
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 22
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - OTPP Investment Strategy
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 24
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 25
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Central Bank Scorecards
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 27
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 28
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Brazil Liability Management
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Real Estate Equity Resurrected
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 31
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 32
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 33
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 34
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 35
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 36
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Structured Finance Forecasts
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 38
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Grim Outlook. Reform Required
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 40
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 41
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 42
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 43
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 44
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Banorte Seeks to Grow
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Peru Spending Hits a Block
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 47
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 48
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 49
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - BCP Sees Better Days
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 51
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 52
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 53
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 54
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Caribbean Investment Report
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 56
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 57
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 58
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 59
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 60
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 61
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 62
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 63
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 64
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 65
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 66
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Sustainable Banking
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 68
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Legal Services Survey
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 70
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 71
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 72
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 73
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 74
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 75
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 76
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 77
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 78
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Parting Shot
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - 80
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Cover3
Latin Finance - September/October 2009 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/0319QMR
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1218JYM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/paraguay_2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8320YTM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8465TBM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1476YBW
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7835THM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8655TGL
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/0614IJP
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/ecuador_20170910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/2713KNP
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/4982CFT
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7803HWE
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/3829THA
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7891MDD
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7714JCR
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/5619CMK
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/6939ASL
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1364ASF
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/0453DAS
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/0453DAS_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1304APV
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7234GSD
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1643XGS
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9511JKM_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9511JKM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8745TNV
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/3629PBC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7466TBC_HSBC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7466TBC_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7466TBC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9463RVB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7345GPY
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/6398TVB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/4899EXM_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/4899EXM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/3885CWS
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/45923GBC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/67449NBD
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/46733NLP
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/78456HCL
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/89456RBM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/22278HBL
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/2895YBM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9033TBM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8934TNP
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/costarica20130304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/4672PNB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9377BKL
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/drmtest
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/drmtest2
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/5532LMC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9044TBM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/4877RBC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/3008JHV
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/3728YBC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9337KLM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/5674GNJ
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8330KMC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7663HCM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/2319ZMB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7110MKL
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8599FHG
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/4517HJK
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7813GHB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1564FBM
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8884HGV
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7863SVB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/5233SFB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/5899SML
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/4311PMN
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1366FBB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/9355AXC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8559EBN
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8244QXC
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/1779BBN
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/7144XVB
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/8971QGH
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/200805
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/200804
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/latinfinance/200803
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com