International Educator - September/October 2011 - 20

a student participating in State university of new York’s the Jamaica Field Service Project tutors a student in reading and writing at the Pondside Primary School library in St. elizabeth, Jamaica.

provides long-term care for children who are orphans or whose families can no longer care for them. The university’s students specialize in a wide range of subjects, but particularly literacy and science. As part of the experience, the student teachers model educational methods for the local teachers. “It’s truly a partnership,” McDonald says. While the university students provide input to the Ghanaian teachers, “they’re giving us a place where our students can learn” how to teach in a classroom setting. The students stay in the “village” with the children, who live in houses with a house mom. In their free time, the university students might tutor the youngsters or play sports with them. Central Michigan University students spend eight weeks student teaching in Ghana and eight weeks in Michigan. The university is located in a rural part of Michigan, McDonald says, so by going to Ghana the students “see various ethnicities, religions, and ways to do things.” It’s a similar situation in Uganda, where students specializing in curriculum and instruction in the elementary teacher education program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison spend 10 weeks student teaching at the Rwentutu Community Christian School in Kasese, Uganda, along with 10 weeks teaching in Wisconsin. Maggie Hawkins, a curriculum and instruction professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says this can give the Wisconsin students a leg up when they look for jobs after graduation. “We believe, given the population trends here, they are going to have English learners in the classroom. The

difference they’re going to have in understanding (of those from another culture) is huge.” Uganda is another country where the teachers typically lecture and the youngsters take notes. The school can’t afford textbooks, so the teachers write lessons on the blackboard, the class reads what has been written, and they write it down. “It was all rote and memorization,” says Whitney Newman, an elementary education major with a minor in English language arts who traveled to Uganda in 2010, and now is a fifth-grade teacher in the Menomonee Falls school district in Wisconsin. All coursework is geared to preparing for exams administered by the Ugandan government, and there is little student-teacher interaction or critical thinking involved. Another complicating factor is that the teaching is being done in English—a language many students never encountered before they enrolled in school. But the Rwentutu Community Christian School is hoping to improve the curriculum by bringing in educators from Canada and the United States. Hawkins first became aware of the school while she was teaching in Vancouver, Canada, and met Amos and Edith Kambere, who run a center to assist African refugees in the Vancouver area. Amos Kambere is a former Ugandan high school teacher and member of Parliament who had to flee that country when the government fell in 1986. He and his family eventually settled in Canada, and in the mid-2000s he started raising funds for a school in his home village of Kasese, which had never had a school located there before. When the Rwentutu school opened in 2007 it had 90 pupils. Now it serves about 250 youngsters in kindergarten through sixth grade, and a seventh-grade class will be added for the 2011–2012 school year. While Uganda has free universal primary education, many children don’t attend school because their families don’t have the money to pay for uniforms or to cover other costs, Kambere says. And at public schools, many classrooms are jammed with 80 children, while classes at Rwentutu are onehalf to one-third that size. Along with teaching the children, the school also offers a literacy education program for their mothers. Kambere views it as the only way for parents to improve their standard of living, while also being able to help their children learn. Literacy is “the only way you can impact a nation and its economic well-being,” he says. For students from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the effort with Rwentutu school “is life altering,” Hawkins says. “It’s much more of a partnership than traditional student teaching.” Because the area is so rural, the student teachers bring school supplies and books with them. Given the fact the youngsters at the Rwentutu school come from a storytelling culture, the children love the stories con-

InternatIonal educator S E P T + O C T. 11

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ErIC WIllS, JAFSP



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - September/October 2011

International Educator - September/October 2011
Contents
From the Editors
In Brief
Building a Literate World
In Sync:  The Peace Corps and International Education
Expanding Cooperative Education Across the Globe
Education Abroad
Foreign Student Affairs
Partnering
A View From Out Here
Forum
In Focus
Supplement: A 360º View
Supplement: Making the Numbers Work
Supplement: International Recruitment and Enrollment Listings
International Educator - September/October 2011 - International Educator - September/October 2011
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Cover2
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Contents
International Educator - September/October 2011 - From the Editors
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 3
International Educator - September/October 2011 - In Brief
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 5
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 6
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 7
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 8
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 9
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 10
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 11
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 12
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 13
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Building a Literate World
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 15
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 16
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 17
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 18
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 19
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 20
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 21
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 22
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 23
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 24
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 25
International Educator - September/October 2011 - In Sync:  The Peace Corps and International Education
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 27
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 28
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 29
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 30
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 31
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 32
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 33
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 34
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 35
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Expanding Cooperative Education Across the Globe
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 37
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 38
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 39
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 40
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 41
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 42
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 43
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 44
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 45
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Education Abroad
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 47
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 48
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 49
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Foreign Student Affairs
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 51
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 52
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 53
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Partnering
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 55
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 56
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 57
International Educator - September/October 2011 - A View From Out Here
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 59
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Forum
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 61
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 62
International Educator - September/October 2011 - 63
International Educator - September/October 2011 - In Focus
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Cover3
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Cover4
International Educator - September/October 2011 - CoverS1
International Educator - September/October 2011 - CoverS2
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Supplement: A 360º View
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S2
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S3
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S4
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S5
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S6
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S7
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S8
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S9
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S10
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Supplement: Making the Numbers Work
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S12
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S13
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S14
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S15
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S16
International Educator - September/October 2011 - Supplement: International Recruitment and Enrollment Listings
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S18
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S19
International Educator - September/October 2011 - S20
International Educator - September/October 2011 - CoverS3
International Educator - September/October 2011 - CoverS4
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