International Educator - November/December 2011 - S2

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EDUCATOR
H E A LT H & I N S U R A N C E S U P P L E M E N T

International

with volatile chemicals or rural teaching internships in developing countries). In addition, short-term recruitment trips to overseas campuses or fundraising activities in capital cities may expose travelers to petty crime or nonlife-threatening-health conditions such as travelers’ diarrhea, but the limited duration suggests the risk of experiencing more serious problems is relatively low. Long-term development projects in extremely rural or high-risk locations, like Somalia or Pakistan, may expose faculty or staff to serious health risks, terrorism, or kidnapping. If, however, the project is comanaged by local experts, staffed by area residents, and of high value to the community, certain risks are diminished.

safety, or security. (See the chart titled, “Risk Rating System for OSA Countries/Cities.”)

Assess the Risk From Your Desk
Ideally, you’ll be able to visit all of your program sites at least once a year to obtain a true sense of risk; however, this is likely impossible for even the most well-funded and well-staffed institutions. Much can be done at your desk to assess the risk in your various international programs.

Health Risks
A cursory assessment of health risks need not soley be done by a health professional. By consulting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Travelers’ Health Web sites (see “Web Resources” on page 8), you’ll be able to view the general health risks and specific risks related to a region or activity, as well as recommended and required vaccinations. The World Health Organization is the leading source for tracking the outbreak and spread of infectious diseases worldwide and should also be consulted to determine serious health risks. Following these initial steps, a more in-depth review of health risks can be undertaken by a medical professional (ideally specializing in travel medicine) for locations of heightened concern. Medical or dental students participating in clinical rotations overseas pose special risks. Failure of equipment or supplies, as well as accidents, can result in exposure to bodily fluids that carry communicable disease, such as HIV or hepatitis. Although rare, accidents do occur and individuals on site (students or faculty) must be familiar with the latest postexposure response protocols. Those unfortunate few who subsequently test positive for a serious disease will not only have their health compromised, but potentially their future professions and livelihood as well. One useful tool to mitigate the risk of exposure to bodily fluids is to require such travelers to participate in predeparture blood-bornepathogen training. At large campuses with medical, dental, or veterinary programs, training may be free or available for a minimal cost through an office for occupational health and safety. Otherwise, a county health department or local hospital may be able to assist. Whether assisting in surgery or changing a diaper at an orphanage, it is important to remember exposure can happen at many different levels and in different ways. Some overseas locations may have limited or poor-quality health care facilities, and naturally this will increase risk unless safe and reliable transportation exists to quickly transport seriously ill or injured individuals to a better-equipped hospital or clinic. Some locations may be so remote that special arrangeSHUTTERSTOCK

Determine Insurance Exclusions
Another important step in a risk assessment is to determine whether or not your institution’s insurance carrier restricts or excludes coverage in countries perceived to be of high risk; for example, countries with U.S. Department of State Travel Warnings or countries sanctioned by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), which enforces economic and trade sanctions based on national security goals and U.S. foreign policy. If your institution or organization sponsors travel in locations with such restrictions or exclusions, you generally have three options: renegotiate your policy wordINTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR 2 012 H E A LT H & I N S U R A N C E S U P P L E M E N T

ing to broaden coverage, prohibit the travel, or take steps to mitigate risks and be financially and operationally prepared to support travelers in need. Most insurance carriers are flexible and will consider covering travel to “high-risk” countries if they have a thorough understanding of the proposed travel (group size, duration, destination, etc.) and are comfortable with the university’s risk management plan including its emergency evacuation and contingency plans.

Use a Rating Tool or Matrix
If your operations are large or complex, using an existing riskrating tool may be an effective way to categorize concerns. This can help you focus on the risk management stage by identifying activities of concern or geographic areas of heightened risk. Many security information providers have developed rating systems that can form the basis of an annual report, such as Control Risks’ RiskMap. Michigan State University’s Office of Study Abroad (MSU/OSA) developed a rating tool for its education abroad programs that borrows the risk labels of “insignificant,” “low,” “medium,” “high,” or “extreme” from RiskMap. MSU/OSA then added descriptors to the RiskMap template based on three categories under each label: health,

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - November/December 2011

International Educator - November/December 2011
Contents
From the Editors
In Brief
Cultivating Branch Campuses
India Opens Its Doors— Cautiously
A Quest to Enhance Quality Spurs Global Learning
Foreign Student Affairs
A View From Out Here
Forum
In Focus
Health and Insurance Supplement
Supplement: Danger Ahead!
Supplement: Their Baggage Goes, Too
Supplement: Directory of Insurance Providers, Services, and Products
International Educator - November/December 2011 - International Educator - November/December 2011
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Cover2
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Contents
International Educator - November/December 2011 - From the Editors
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 3
International Educator - November/December 2011 - In Brief
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 5
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 6
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 7
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 8
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 9
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 10
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 11
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 12
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 13
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 14
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 15
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 16
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 17
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Cultivating Branch Campuses
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 19
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 20
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 21
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 22
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 23
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 24
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 25
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 26
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 27
International Educator - November/December 2011 - India Opens Its Doors— Cautiously
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 29
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 30
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 31
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 32
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 33
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 34
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 35
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 36
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 37
International Educator - November/December 2011 - A Quest to Enhance Quality Spurs Global Learning
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 39
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 40
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 41
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 42
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 43
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 44
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 45
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Foreign Student Affairs
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 47
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 48
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 49
International Educator - November/December 2011 - A View From Out Here
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 51
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Forum
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 53
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 54
International Educator - November/December 2011 - 55
International Educator - November/December 2011 - In Focus
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Cover3
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Cover4
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Health and Insurance Supplement
International Educator - November/December 2011 - SCover2
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Supplement: Danger Ahead!
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S2
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S3
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S4
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S5
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S6
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S7
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S8
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S9
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S10
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Supplement: Their Baggage Goes, Too
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S12
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S13
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S14
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S15
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S16
International Educator - November/December 2011 - Supplement: Directory of Insurance Providers, Services, and Products
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S18
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S19
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S20
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S21
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S22
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S23
International Educator - November/December 2011 - S24
International Educator - November/December 2011 - SCover3
International Educator - November/December 2011 - SCover4
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