International Educator - January/February 2012 - 6

Feinstein (California) secured his release. Jessica Colotl, Kennesaw State University undergraduate who was turned over to Cobb County, Georgia, authorities after a campus officer stopped her for a minor traffic violation, spent 37 days in a federal detention center in Alabama before being freed and allowed to finish her degree. Undocumented students often turn to or are directed to the international student office on campuses, due both to the international educators’ expertise on the complex U.S. immigration laws and their natural inclination to help these students. “We serve as a default resource to the students because there’s really no other place on campus for them to go,” said Teri Albrecht, director of international student and scholar services at the University of Texas at Austin. “We’ve had students come here and say, ‘Where on campus can I work?’ And we have to tell them they’re not eligible.” “The main thing we do is listen and let them know we understand the difficulties that they’re going through. A lot of times they’ve never talked about this to anyone before,” said Albrecht, who wrote her PhD dissertation on the obstacles undocumented students face. Many study to enter “helping professions” such as teaching and medicine, but upon graduation “they hit the next wall. Their possibilities start diminishing. What’s next? They can’t work. They can’t go out into their field and do what they’ve been studying for.” When Cary Jensen, director of the University of Rochester’s International Services Office, found out after two days about Albert Ngobeni’s arrest, he immediately headed to the Batavia detention center and made a second trip the next day to bring the student a chemistry text, a copy of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and other books to read. Jensen got in because he is a licensed attorney, but guards turned the books away; only paperbacks mailed directly from a publisher were allowed. Albert was kept an extra four nights in the jail—which holds both undocumented adults and criminal suspects—after a fam-

States with a Dream Act allowing in-state tuition:
Texas, California, utah, new york, Washington, Illinois, Kansas, new Mexico, nebraska, Maryland, Connecticut. Rhode Island did so administratively. Wisconsin repealed its law in 2011. Oklahoma repealed its in-state tuition law in 2007, but left the Oklahoma Board of Regents free to set policy; the Regents still allow undocumented students to pay in-state rates.

States that prohibit undocumented students from paying in-state tuition:
Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, and Indiana.
source: national Conference of state Legislatures

ily friend arrived half an hour late on Friday afternoon to post a $5,000 bond before the long Labor Day weekend. Albert was the second Rochester freshman picked up in this manner by Border Patrol agents who regularly perform identity checks in Rochester’s bus and rail stations, Jensen said. “They spent time in jail for doing nothing wrong other than they turned 18 and didn’t immediately turn themselves in or go back to a country they’ve never even known.” While the White House and Homeland Security may have declared college students a low priority for deportation, “that message hasn’t gotten to the boots on the ground,” said Jensen. (Jensen later said a deputy chief of the Border Patrol told immigration lawyers attending a conference at Cornell Law School that the agency was no longer going to have standing immigration checks at the Rochester bus station, train station and airport, but would still carry out checks in response to investigations or leads.) A spokesman for the Border Patrol’s Buffalo sector, Supervisory Agent Raymond Mandel, said the agency detains every person arrested for immigration violations, college student or not, and ICE then makes the decision whether to release or hold them.

In a speech given at American University in October, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano admitted that it takes time to “turn the ship around” and said that she was meeting with her staff to discuss how to better shift practices on the ground based on the department’s priorities. Albert will appear before an immigration judge in Buffalo in February, where in all likelihood ICE will decline to prosecute him. Numerous college presidents have spoken out on behalf of Dream Act students, including UCLA Chancellor Gene Block and Indiana University (IU) President Michael McRobbie. McRobbie helped convince Indianapolis lawmakers to drop “even more draconian” provisions from the measure barring in-state tuition that Governor Mitch Daniels eventually signed, said Christopher Viers, IU associate vice president for international services. Still, Viers likened the law to dumping “a bucket of ice cold water on our efforts to provide international students and scholars with a warm welcoming environment to IU and the state of Indiana.” He added, “Measures like this, unfortunately, only lead to a growing perception that our institutions in the U.S. are closing their doors to the world’s future leaders.” Over the summer, all 340,000 students registering for classes at Indiana’s seven public colleges had to sign electronic affidavits verifying that they were U.S. citizens, permanent residents, asylees or refugees, or international students with valid visas. If they selected the box saying they were “unable to verify lawful presence in the United States,” then their tuition immediately went up more than threefold, from $8,432 a year to $28,449. About 300 students statewide were hit with the increase. Dream Act activists Erick and Omar Gama, twin brothers from Cuernavaca, Mexico, were among the 21 IU Bloomington students whose tuition bills skyrocketed. The 20-year-old twins also were arrested with four others in a rally and protest in-

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International Educator - January/February 2012

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - January/February 2012

International Educator - January/February 2012
Contents
From the Editors
Front Lines
In Brief
Voices: Rollins College President Lewis Duncan
Finding a Home in Higher Education
Promoting Peace Th Rough Partnerships
New York University Becomes a Global Network University
International Education Fairs
Education Abroad
A View From Out Here
In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2012 - International Educator - January/February 2012
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Cover2
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Contents
International Educator - January/February 2012 - From the Editors
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 3
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Front Lines
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 5
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 6
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 7
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 8
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 9
International Educator - January/February 2012 - In Brief
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 11
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 12
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 13
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 14
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 15
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 16
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 17
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 18
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 19
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 20
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 21
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Voices: Rollins College President Lewis Duncan
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 23
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 24
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 25
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 26
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 27
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Finding a Home in Higher Education
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 29
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 30
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 31
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 32
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 33
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 34
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 35
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 36
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 37
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 38
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 39
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Promoting Peace Th Rough Partnerships
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 41
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 42
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 43
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 44
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 45
International Educator - January/February 2012 - New York University Becomes a Global Network University
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 47
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 48
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 49
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 50
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 51
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 52
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 53
International Educator - January/February 2012 - International Education Fairs
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 55
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Education Abroad
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 57
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 58
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 59
International Educator - January/February 2012 - A View From Out Here
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 61
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 62
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 63
International Educator - January/February 2012 - In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Cover3
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Cover4
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