International Educator - January/February 2012 - 8

side the Statehouse in May. They spoke no English when they joined their parents in Indianapolis at age 11, but within two years were honors students. Erick, an interior design major who performed in show choir at Arsenal Tech High School, used to let “only close friends who I trusted” know that he wasn’t a U.S. citizen, but became a Dream Act activist in college. After their arrest, they were charged with criminal trespass and disorderly conduct—both misdemeanors—and ordered to perform 24 hours of community service, “but ICE decided not to take us. They didn’t want to waste their resources.” The state’s citizenship affidavit relied on the honor system, but “it was a Class B felony if you lied. We don’t want that on our record,” said Erick. He doesn’t expect to be deported, holds out hope a federal Dream Act eventually will pass, but fears that more states will deny in-state tuition to students like him (the federal Dream Act would leave tuition decisions in states’ hands). He cut back on classes to mitigate the steep tuition increase. “We had some money and we got some private scholarships and other families are helping us,” he said. Another activist, University of Illinois student Andrea Rosales, went to Atlanta and was arrested in April with six other students after blocking a downtown street in protest of a Georgia Board of Regents policy that bars undocumented students from the state’s five most selective universities. A member of a student group called La Colectiva, she wore a T shirt that said “undocumented and unafraid” in a video posted on YouTube. Charged with obstructing traffic, they were held overnight, released and given a short community service sentence. Rosales, 22, who graduated in May with a degree in sociology and Latino studies, was brought to the United States from Guanajuato, Mexico, at age 5 and didn’t find out she was undocumented until she had to turn down a work-study job in high school. “I’m not worried at all” about being deported, she said. “If you’re vocal and open about it, they really are too afraid to touch us.” She cannot work now, but aspires to get a PhD in ethnic studies and become a professor.

n auguSt 18, 2011, Department of Homeland security secretary Janet napolitano announced [in a letter to Illinois senator Richard Durbin and other senators] that the Obama administration established a new process for handling the deportation cases of DREAM Act students and other sympathetic individuals.

“If fully implemented, the new process should stop virtually all DREAM Act deportations, Durbin said in a statement. He further noted: “The Obama administration ” has made the right decision in changing the way they handle deportations of DREAM Act students. These students are the future doctors, lawyers, teachers and, maybe, senators, who will make America stronger. We need to be doing all we can to keep these talented, dedicated, American students here, not wasting increasingly precious resources sending them away to countries they barely remember. The administration’s new process is a fair and just way to deal with an important group of immigrant students, and I will closely monitor DHS to ensure it is fully implemented. ”
under the new process, a Department of Homeland security (DHs) and Department of Justice (DOJ) working group will develop specific criteria to identify low-priority removal cases that should be considered for prosecutorial discretion. these criteria will be based on “positive factors” from the Morton Memo (see p. 5), which include individuals present in the united states since childhood (like DREAM Act students), minors, the elderly, pregnant and nursing women, victims of serious crimes, veterans and members of the armed services, and individuals with serious disabilities or health problems. the working group will develop a process for reviewing cases pending before immigration and federal courts that meet these specific criteria.

Michael Olivas, a University of Houston law professor who helped write the original Texas Dream Act and has been a forceful advocate for undocumented students, counsels students against civil disobedience. “They are still deporting people—students, military spouses, and others with no record of criminal behavior,” he said. “I keep begging students, ‘Please don’t out yourself.’ In the civil rights tradition that this is in, they all want to be Martin Luther King writing letters from Birmingham jail. But Martin Luther King wasn’t deported when he was released from jail.” An estimated 65,000 undocumented students graduate from U.S. high schools each year, but the National Conference of State Legislators says “only 5 percent of these students attend college.” The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, which tracks the state’s so-called HB 1403 students (the number of the original House bill), counted 16,476 who qualified for in-state tuition in 2010. More than 12,000 attended community, technical, or state colleges; 4,400 were at universities. Some 2,500 of these students received financial aid from the state.

In California, Governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat who signed two Dream Act bills including the financial aid measure that had been vetoed four times by Republican governors, estimated that an additional 2,500 students will qualify for Cal Grants at a cost to the state of $14.5 million, a sliver of its $1.4 billion budget. Brown said in a statement, “Going to college is a dream that promises intellectual excitement and creative thinking. The Dream Act benefits us all by giving top students a chance to improve their lives and the lives of all of us.” Illinois Governor Pat Quinn, also a Democrat, expressed similar sentiments in August when he signed a measure creating a privately funded Illinois Dream Fund to award scholarships to the children of immigrants. It also opened the state’s college savings funds to students whose parents have a taxpayer identification number, not just those with a Social Security number. In a signing ceremony held in Chicago’s largely Mexican Pilsen neighborhood, Quinn said, “Today we are showing what democracy is all about. We say to all the people in our country and in our state that we want every-

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International Educator - January/February 2012

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - January/February 2012

International Educator - January/February 2012
Contents
From the Editors
Front Lines
In Brief
Voices: Rollins College President Lewis Duncan
Finding a Home in Higher Education
Promoting Peace Th Rough Partnerships
New York University Becomes a Global Network University
International Education Fairs
Education Abroad
A View From Out Here
In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2012 - International Educator - January/February 2012
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Cover2
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Contents
International Educator - January/February 2012 - From the Editors
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 3
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Front Lines
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 5
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 6
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 7
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 8
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 9
International Educator - January/February 2012 - In Brief
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 11
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 12
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 13
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 14
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 15
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 16
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 17
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 18
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 19
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 20
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 21
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Voices: Rollins College President Lewis Duncan
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 23
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 24
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 25
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 26
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 27
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Finding a Home in Higher Education
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 29
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 30
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 31
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 32
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 33
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 34
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 35
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 36
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 37
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 38
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 39
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Promoting Peace Th Rough Partnerships
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 41
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 42
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 43
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 44
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 45
International Educator - January/February 2012 - New York University Becomes a Global Network University
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 47
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 48
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 49
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 50
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 51
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 52
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 53
International Educator - January/February 2012 - International Education Fairs
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 55
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Education Abroad
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 57
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 58
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 59
International Educator - January/February 2012 - A View From Out Here
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 61
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 62
International Educator - January/February 2012 - 63
International Educator - January/February 2012 - In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Cover3
International Educator - January/February 2012 - Cover4
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