International Educator - May/June 2013 - 84

can’t predict with certainty what skills the
rapidly changing economies and societies of the twenty-first century will require,
certain elements are clear. They will be: (1)
science and technology-based, requiring
scientific and technological literacy; (2) globally interdependent so that global knowledge
and skills become a core competence; (3)
demographically diverse so that cross-cultural understanding and communication
are critical; (4) innovation-driven, placing a
premium on creativity and learning how to
learn; and (5) resource-challenged, in need
of critical thinking about sustainability.
There is growing awareness among
both policymakers and parents of the need
to make our schools world-class, as well
as increasing interest among schools in
becoming more globally oriented. But it
will not happen unless we transform the
teaching profession. Despite intense attention to internationalization within higher
education institutions, the preparation of
teachers is typically among the least internationalized functions of U.S. college and
university campuses.

What Higher Education
Institutions Can Do

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M AY + J U N E . 13

Helping the next generation of students to
succeed in today’s global context is a tremendous challenge that will require the
attention of the whole university. Universities urgently need to address the goal of
developing a world-class teaching profession through two strategies—learning from
international best practices and increasing
the global competencies of teachers.

84  

Learning from
international best practices

Elementary and secondary education systems that outperform the United States are
in different parts of the world and have different organizational structures and cultural
and political contexts, but they all put a central focus on developing the highest quality
teaching profession. The highest performing
countries do a much better job than others
of recruiting students from the top half of
the academic talent pool to go into teaching,
preparing them well, providing professional

development, and mentoring to all new
teachers so that they can be effective and
retaining them in the profession. Whereas in
too many places in the United States, teacher
education programs have low admissions
standards, are rated poorly by teachers for
the preparation they provide, and their graduates do not stay in the profession.

Universities urgently need
to address the goal of
developing a world-class
teaching profession through
two strategies—learning from
international best practices
and increasing the global
competencies of teachers.
To be sure, higher education institutions
are not solely responsible for all aspects of
the teaching profession. School districts,
state governments, and teacher unions all
play roles in issues like certification, compensation, working conditions, and career
development, for example. But higher education institutions can play a critical role in
establishing higher standards of entry into
teacher preparation—raising the quality of
preparation programs to attract able students, and prepare them adequately for the
challenges of today’s diverse learning environments and the new skills needed for a
globalized and digital world; and collaborating with school systems to get feedback on
the success of their graduates.
Teacher preparation programs that
meet current international standards of
best practice, for example, have: (1) clear,
internationally benchmarked standards and
accountability for what their graduates should
know and be able to do; (2) more emphasis
right from the start on guided practice in
classroom settings; (3) greater capacity by
teachers in using inquiry and problem-solving
methods and in incorporating information
and communication technologies; (4) greater
facility by teachers in using assessment and
data to guide instruction; (5) greater understanding of local and global diversity; and (6)
research and diagnostic skills to solve classroom problems based on evidence.

Higher education’s school leadership
programs also need to become more rigorous and internationally benchmarked. Most
countries today are devolving more authority to schools to meet their increasingly
ambitious educational goals for students.
Hence, their universities are replacing their
old school administration programs (whose
quality and relevance in the United States
have been criticized in innumerable studies)
with programs that redefine the leadership
responsibilities of their graduates as those
most closely linked to improved student
outcomes. These include setting strategic
direction and using data to drive progress;
developing and evaluating teachers; resource allocation to focus all activities on
learning; and partnering with other institutions to ensure the development of the
whole child.4 Close collaboration between
universities and schools is also essential to
the recruitment of potential school leaders
and to provide adequate clinical training and
mentorship to new principals. School leaders are a relatively small but pivotal group
in moving schools toward higher achievement and in retaining effective teachers, so
an investment in producing effective school
leaders can yield a high rate of return.
Just as schools of business, engineering, medicine, law, and public health follow
international as well as domestic developments in their fields, learning from other
countries as well as sharing the best U.S.
experience with international colleagues,
so do universities need to ensure that
their colleges of education redesign their
teacher and school leadership programs for
the twenty-first century, informed by the
world’s best practices.
Increasing the
global competencies of teachers

Few teachers today are prepared with the
knowledge and skills to educate students for
the new global reality. To facilitate their students’ learning, teachers themselves need to
become globally competent individuals, defined by a task force of the Council of Chief
State School Officers and Asia Society as
those who “have the knowledge and skills to
investigate the world beyond their immediate



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - May/June 2013

International Educator - May/June 2013
Contents
From the Editors
Front Lines
In Brief
Voices: Kofi Annan
Peace Pathways
Shared Solutions
San Francisco State Shines in Long-Term Study Abroad
Education Abroad
Foreign Student Affairs
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2013 - International Educator - May/June 2013
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Cover2
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Contents
International Educator - May/June 2013 - From the Editors
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 3
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Front Lines
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 5
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 6
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 7
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 8
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 9
International Educator - May/June 2013 - In Brief
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 11
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 12
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 13
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 14
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 15
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 16
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 17
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 18
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 19
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 20
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 21
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 22
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 23
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Voices: Kofi Annan
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 25
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 26
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 27
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 28
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 29
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 30
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 31
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Peace Pathways
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 33
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 34
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 35
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 36
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 37
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 38
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 39
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 40
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 41
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 42
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 43
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Shared Solutions
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 45
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 46
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 47
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 48
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 49
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 50
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 51
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 52
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 53
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 54
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 55
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 56
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 57
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 58
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 59
International Educator - May/June 2013 - San Francisco State Shines in Long-Term Study Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 61
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 62
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 63
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 64
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 65
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 66
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 67
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 68
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 69
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Education Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 71
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 72
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 73
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 74
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 75
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Foreign Student Affairs
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 77
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 78
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 79
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 80
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 81
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Forum
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 83
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 84
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 85
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 86
International Educator - May/June 2013 - 87
International Educator - May/June 2013 - In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Cover3
International Educator - May/June 2013 - Cover4
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