International Educator - March/April 2016 - 32

Students from
the University of
Texas at Austin
with Gerardo
Hernandez of
Casa de las
Americas in Cuba.

32  

in 2013-14. The number of Brazilian students studying in
the United States was 13,286 in 2013-14, compared with
4,226 U.S. students studying abroad in Brazil.
Some U.S. students studying in Brazil, such as those
from the University of Texas-Austin, participate in language and culture training programs through specialized
cultural institutions, as opposed to HEIs. Since 1999
ACBEU Language School (The Associação Cultural
Brasil-Estados Unidos) has partnered with U.S. HEIs to
teach Portuguese and Brazilian Culture through one- to
10-week programs to more than 3,000 U.S. university students, says Clara Ramos, coordinator of the Portuguese
and Culture Program at ACBEU.
There is a widespread sense among experts that the
United States has been a relative loser in procuring new
Latin American HEI partnerships in recent years because
it has not recognized the challenge and mounted aggres-

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M A R + A P R .16

sive partnership campaigns on a national basis like some
other regions. "We don't have a true national strategy and
while the 100,000 Strong program is a great symbolic gesture, it relies on the good will of partnering companies to
provide funding," Lane says.
In particular, in Mexico, many partnership arrangements have withered with U.S. institutions reluctant to
send faculty and students to Mexican partner HEIs. A
May-June 2013 International Educator article, "Shared
Solutions," examined Mexican-American partnerships.
Still, for many U.S. HEIs, relationships with Latin
American HEIs are vital to their mission, in particular
those in the southwestern United States, whose proximity
to Mexico and Latin America, similar geographic issues,
and large Latino student and state populations, make such
collaborations a natural fit and growth trajectory.
"Foreign partnerships [with Latin American HEIs]
have been established to support the university's mission
and values and to specifically contribute to student learning outcomes," says Heather Thompson, director of study
abroad at the University of Texas-Austin. "The benefits
of these educational opportunities are twofold: (1) to increase opportunities for learning, personal growth, and
career network development for the Austin students as
well as the foreign students that come to our campus, (2)
to support faculty in their teaching, research, and publications with targeted partners.
"Many of these partnerships provide faculty and students exposure to academic pursuits that cannot be fully
realized in Austin. For example, we can't complete an indepth study of rainforest ecology from Austin. We can
only go so far to study the political revolutions of Central
America from a textbook. These partnerships give our
faculty direct contact within their field of expertise and
allow them to bring that knowledge back to the Austin
classroom and lab to further expand the learning of our
students. These partnerships facilitate students' learning
in context and prepare them for their careers in ways that
staying in Austin simply can't."
But Thompson says such relationships require particular care: "Partnerships in Latin America require
commitment. They require taking a long-term approach.
They require face-to-face collaboration and discussion.
Unlike European partnerships that can be maintained
virtually and seem to flourish, this is not the case in our
opinion with partnerships in Latin America. UT Austin
understands this dynamic and has invested the resources
to develop and maintain these partnerships."
One leading University of Texas-Austin collaboration
has been with Tecnologico de Monterrey, Thompson says.

UT AUSTIN

But it is a relationship that in recent years has been
strained by some tensions, including a perception by Latin
Americans and HEIs there that it is an uneven relationship
in which there is relatively less interest and investment by
their American partners, says de Wit.
In Mexico, for example, U.S. students studying abroad
at all education levels in Mexico dropped from 10,022 students in 2005-06 to 3,730 in 2012-13, before rebounding
to 4,445 in 2013-14, according to International Institute of
Education's Open Doors data, published by the Institute of
International Education, which is funded by a grant from
the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and
Cultural Affairs. Over the same period, Mexican students
studying in the United States rose modestly from 13,931
in 2005-06 to 14,779 in 2012-13, before leaping to 17,052



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - March/April 2016

Contents
International Educator - March/April 2016 - Cover1
International Educator - March/April 2016 - Cover2
International Educator - March/April 2016 - Contents
International Educator - March/April 2016 - 2
International Educator - March/April 2016 - 3
International Educator - March/April 2016 - 4
International Educator - March/April 2016 - 5
International Educator - March/April 2016 - 6
International Educator - March/April 2016 - 7
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International Educator - March/April 2016 - 55
International Educator - March/April 2016 - 56
International Educator - March/April 2016 - Cover3
International Educator - March/April 2016 - Cover4
International Educator - March/April 2016 - FCover1
International Educator - March/April 2016 - FCover2
International Educator - March/April 2016 - F1
International Educator - March/April 2016 - F2
International Educator - March/April 2016 - F3
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International Educator - March/April 2016 - F18
International Educator - March/April 2016 - F19
International Educator - March/April 2016 - F20
International Educator - March/April 2016 - FCover3
International Educator - March/April 2016 - FCover4
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