International Educator - May/June 2016 - 66

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INTERNATIONAL ENROLLMENT
By Dana Wilkie

Recruiting in India
MORE THAN HALF of the 1.2 billion people living in India are younger than 25 years old. The

nation has a growing middle class with increasing spending power. And there are far more high
school students seeking college spots than there are Indian universities to accommodate them.

The number
of Indian
students in
the United
States
has risen
significantly.
In 2005-06
there were
76,503 Indian
students
on U.S.
campuses.
Ten years
later, that
number
has risen 74
percent, to
132,888.

66  

All of this has made the United States among the most
important recruitment markets for India's undergraduate
and graduate students.
But recruiting those students today is different than it
was a decade ago: There is more of a focus on undergraduate applications; on promoting the flexibility of the U.S.
higher-education experience; on using indigenous recruiters who know the country and language, and can help with
visa and travel requirements; and on increasing scholarships and financial aid to lure India's best and brightest.
"India has always been, and will continue to be, a
leading source of international students aspiring to study
abroad because of India's gap between supply and demand for quality education, its caste-based admissions
system, its outdated and rigid curricula, and the lack of
employability for students on graduation," said Mallik R
Sundharam, director of recruitment and partner support
in the Chennai offices of ELS Educational Services Inc.

Demand Outstrips Supply
In January 2016, the Hindustan Times reported that more
than 80 percent of engineering students graduating from
Indian universities could not find work in their home
country. Why not? Because there is a glut of bright, welleducated students coming out of Indian universities every
year, but not enough jobs to go around. And because the
demand for college spots has led to a cottage industry of
"mom-and-pop" Indian universities-which don't always
produce well-educated graduates.
Stepping in to pick up the slack are nations like the United States-the number one study destination for India's
college-age students-followed by Australia, Canada, and
the United Kingdom, according to the 2015 Open Doors
report published by the Institute of International Education,
which is supported by a grant from the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.
The number of potential international destinations for
Indian students is large, and growing. Australia, the Unit-

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M AY + J U N E .16

ed Kingdom, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, France,
China, Japan, and Singapore are among the countries
competing for well-qualified Indian students. Canada and
Germany, in particular, have been successful in increasing
the number of Indian students on their campuses.
"It's going from a situation where the U.S. was probably
one of two or three destination countries to where 10 or
12 countries" are luring an increasing number of Indian
students, said Girish Barolla, CEO of GEN Next Education, Inc., which contracts with U.S. universities to recruit
Indian students.
That doesn't mean the United States is losing students
to other nations, he said. Instead, "the pie is getting bigger
in India." The number of Indian students in the United
States has risen significantly. In 2005-06 there were
76,503 Indian students on U.S. campuses. Ten years later,
that number has risen 74 percent, to 132,888, according
to the Open Doors report.
The factors that influence the flow of student traffic
from India to the United States include: the economic conditions in the United States, as many new Indian graduates
choose to remain in the country to work; proposals to extend the length of postgraduate work for STEM students
in the United States; the availability of financial assistance;
the value of the Indian rupee against the U.S. dollar; and
the perception that U.S. campuses are relatively safe.

Undergraduate Applications on the Rise
While the vast majority of Indians studying abroad are
graduate students, the competitive higher-education
market in India-coupled with new cultural norms and
increasing wealth brought about by dual-income families-has made the undergraduate market alluring.
Barolla is among those pushing to take advantage of
India's undergraduate market. A native of Bangalore, his St.
Paul, Minnesota-based GEN Next, which established the
International Knowledge Center in Bangalore, contracts
with seven U.S. schools to help recruit Indian students-



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - May/June 2016

Toward a Better World
Tech Abroad
The University of Virginia Seeks to Emulate Its Founder
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight
Education Abroad
Foreign Student Affairs
International Enrollment
View From Out Here
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2016 - BB1
International Educator - May/June 2016 - BB2
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Cover1
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Cover2
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 1
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 2
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 3
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Frontlines
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 5
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 6
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 7
International Educator - May/June 2016 - In Brief
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 9
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 10
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 11
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 12
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 13
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 14
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 15
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Global Spotlight
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 17
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 18
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 19
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Toward a Better World
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 21
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 22
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 23
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 24
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 25
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 26
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 27
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 28
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 29
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 30
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 31
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 32
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 33
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 34
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 35
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Tech Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 37
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 38
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 39
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 40
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 41
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 42
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 43
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 44
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 45
International Educator - May/June 2016 - The University of Virginia Seeks to Emulate Its Founder
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 47
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 48
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 49
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 50
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 51
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 52
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 53
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 54
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 55
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Education Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 57
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 58
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 59
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 60
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 61
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Foreign Student Affairs
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 63
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 64
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 65
International Educator - May/June 2016 - International Enrollment
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 67
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 68
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 69
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 70
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 71
International Educator - May/June 2016 - View From Out Here
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 73
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 74
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 75
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Forum
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 77
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 78
International Educator - May/June 2016 - 79
International Educator - May/June 2016 - In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Cover3
International Educator - May/June 2016 - Cover4
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