International Educator - March/April 2017 - 37

The REFUGES program tries to fill that gap. The
after-school program draws 115 young people from 17
middle schools and high schools. They receive science,
technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training
and homework help, along with assistance with college
test preparation. To try to prevent problems, there are
workshops on topics such as drug use prevention, teen
pregnancy prevention, and gang avoidance, Nyawelo says.
Because many parents don't have a driver's license,
taxis are sent to schools to bring students to REFUGES.
There's also a summer program because families can't
afford to send their children to camp.
A couple of former program participants are now
studying at the university and serve as tutors for current
REFUGES participants, Nyawelo says. "If someone looks
like them, they have a good feeling-we're refugees."
The REFUGES program also offers a Summer
Science Bridge Course, designed for incoming freshmen who come from underrepresented backgrounds, to
help ease their transition to college life. They can live on
campus during the seven-week course and get experience doing research. The course covers the foundations
of math, physics, biology, and chemistry. The students
also spend the spring semester of their freshman year in
a paid research lab position.

Online Access to Education
Other programs offer opportunities to refugees scattered around the world through online universities and
educational platforms.
Shai Reshef founded University of the People in 2009,
after a career in education, as a way to "give back."
The curriculum is open source, and university
administration and instruction is led by volunteers.
The university chairman, for example, is John Sexton,
president emeritus of New York University. The university has a pool of more than 5,000 volunteers. "We
believe education should be a right, not a privilege,"
Reshef says.
The nationally accredited online university does not
charge tuition, and students pay $100 for each exam
they take. A complete bachelor's degree costs $4,000.
Scholarship money is available if someone cannot afford
the costs, and the university's supporters include such
groups as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the
William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. "Nobody is left
behind for financial reasons," Reshef says.
The university has about 6,000 students from more
than 180 countries. More than one-third of the students reside in the United States and many are refugees,

immigrants, and undocumented residents. The university also has about 500 Syrian students.
Students have to show a high school diploma and
demonstrate their proficiency in English. They first must
take two courses, one on strategies for online learning
and another in their designated field: business administration, computer science, or health science. After
successfully completing those two courses, they are
considered degree-seeking students.
Students who complete their associate's degree can
continue their studies at the University of California,
Berkeley, and the University of the People is looking
to partner with other schools as well. Providing such
opportunities helps refugees integrate into their new
country, Reshef says.
"If you educate one, you can change a life; if you educate many, you can change the world," he says.
Refugees also have opportunities through online
educational companies and platforms such as Coursera in
Mountain View, California, and Kiron, in Berlin, Germany.
In summer 2016 Coursera partnered with the U.S.
State Department to launch Coursera for Refugees.
Through the program, nonprofit organizations that
work with refugees can apply for financial aid for the
people they serve, says Rebecca Tabor, Coursera's head
of government partnerships.
Coursera is an online education provider, enabling
students from around the world to take courses from
such schools as Stanford University and the University
of Edinburgh. The U.S. State Department is providing
in-person course facilitation through its embassies and
consulates, and nonprofits such as IIE and Libraries
Without Borders are also able to offer the courses.
The program launched in September 2016,
and more than 1,300 refugees have enrolled. So
far the most popular courses among refugees are
Programming for Everybody, Business English,
Marketing in a Digital World, and Grammar and
Punctuation, Taber says.
In Germany, which has had a major influx of Syrian
refugees, the online learning platform Kiron began
offering courses to refugees across the world in 2015,
and now has about 1,500 students enrolled. It used
crowd funding to start, says cofounder Markus Kressler,
and now attracts private partners.
In some countries, there aren't enough places at
universities to accept refugee students, Kressler says,
while in other countries, the refugees don't speak the
native language so they can't enroll in higher education. "We try to eliminate all barriers," Kressler says.
M A R + A P R .17 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - March/April 2017

From the Editor
In Brief
Global Spotlight Cuba
Insights
Voices
Feature: Lay of the Land: What Now?
Feature: Finding Common Ground through Art Therapy
Feature: Empowering Refugees Through Education
Campus Profile: New York Institute of Technology
Campus Snapshot: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
Partnering
View From Out Here
In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 1
International Educator - March/April 2017 - From the Editor
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 3
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 4
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 5
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 6
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 7
International Educator - March/April 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Global Spotlight Cuba
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Insights
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 11
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Voices
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 13
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 14
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 15
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Lay of the Land: What Now?
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 17
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 18
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 19
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 20
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 21
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 22
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 23
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Finding Common Ground through Art Therapy
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 25
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 26
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 27
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 28
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 29
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 30
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 31
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Empowering Refugees Through Education
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 33
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 34
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 35
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 36
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 37
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 38
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Campus Profile: New York Institute of Technology
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 40
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 41
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 42
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 43
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 44
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 45
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 46
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Campus Snapshot: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 48
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 49
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 50
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 51
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 53
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 54
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 55
International Educator - March/April 2017 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 57
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 58
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 59
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Partnering
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 61
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 62
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 63
International Educator - March/April 2017 - View From Out Here
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 65
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 66
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 67
International Educator - March/April 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover4
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