International Educator - March/April 2017 - 38

Supporting Threatened Scholars
Ahmed (not his real name), a professor
of linguistics and translation, fled his
home in Mosul, Iraq, with his wife and
three children the day ISIS fighters
invaded the city in June 2014.
He'd held a tenured position at the
University of Mosul since 2006, and also
worked as a translator and interpreter for
nongovernmental organizations working
to rebuild the city following the Iraq War.
He worked with the American
Provincial Reconstruction Teams to help
bring a TOEFL testing center to the
university, and to establish an "American

Corner" to offer public programs in
English and provide information about
the United States, which he ran with staff
from the U.S. embassy.
But that work left him a target for ISIS
fighters, who took over the city and the
university, and he fled to Kurdistan with
his family, where the influx of academics
meant he had no place to work.
The world's conflicts don't only leave
university students searching for a
new place to study, they also displace
top scholars, who may be able to gain
assistance from the Scholar Rescue

Students have to speak English and prove their
refugee status to enroll with Kiron, where they can
study business and economics, computer science, social
science, and engineering. Kiron uses courses from
universities such as Harvard University, Yale University,
and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
The online courses are blended with live online tutoring, as well as offline programs such as a buddy program,
mentoring program, and career services. Students then
finish their studies at one of Kiron's partner universities
in locations such as Germany, France, and Jordan.
Providing such an opportunity is crucial, Kressler
says, because "education is the key to integration."

Struggles of Syrians
Education is also important if refugees ultimately
return home, says Rachel McCormack, a professor
of literacy education at Roger Williams University in
Bristol, Rhode Island.
She became interested in the plight of Syrian refugees while on sabbatical in Europe in fall 2015, studying
the ways countries and schools meet the needs of their
multilingual populations.
On a trip to the Netherlands, she connected with a
Syrian expert and spent 14 hours at refugee camps in the
country, speaking to refugees as well as a Dutch caseworker. She returned to the United States and launched
the Books for Refugees project to get Arabic-language
books into the hands of Syrian refugee children.
So far she's sent nearly 1,000 books for refugee children
both in the Netherlands and Greece. "Maintenance of
your mother tongue is really important. When you give up
your language, you're giving up a big part of your culture."
38  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M A R + A P R .17

Fund established by the Institute of
International Education (IIE).
"We try to save the lives of the most
threatened," Allan Goodman, president
of IIE, says of the fund, which has been in
place for nearly 100 years.
The Scholar Rescue Fund provides
fellowships for professors, researchers,
and public intellectuals who face
threats to their lives and careers in
their home countries, according to
IIE. The fellowships last one year and
support temporary academic positions
at institutions of higher learning. Most

While English is important to learn if families
must move from place to place, "if you go home to
rebuild the country, you have to be literate in Arabic,"
McCormack says.
For older students, opportunities for education can
be limited, says Rasha Faek, managing editor of Al-Fanar
Media, which covers higher education in the Arab world.
Faek, a Syrian who is based in Amman, Jordan, says "it's
very tough for Syrians to study and work in the region."
While some organizations now provide scholarships
for Syrian students to attend college in countries such
as Jordan and Lebanon, they then have trouble getting
work permits after graduation, she says.
And some universities in the Middle East require
Syrians to provide their original school records before they
can be admitted. "That's very difficult for people running
away from their homes, who are under fire," Faek says.
"We need to be educated in all fields and subjects,"
she says. "Education is a tool to a better future for ourselves, our family and our country."
Even in the United States, "universities could do
better," de Wit says, providing tuition reductions and
waivers to Syrian refugees. "But in the current political
climate, that will not be very easy."

Scholarships Provide New Start
For refugees who have made it to the United States,
efforts are underway to provide scholarships.
Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont, launched
the New American Student Scholarship in 2006.
"Vermont has a significant refugee population," says
Kristi Jovell, assistant vice president of financial aid and
support services. "This really was started with the idea



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - March/April 2017

From the Editor
In Brief
Global Spotlight Cuba
Insights
Voices
Feature: Lay of the Land: What Now?
Feature: Finding Common Ground through Art Therapy
Feature: Empowering Refugees Through Education
Campus Profile: New York Institute of Technology
Campus Snapshot: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
Partnering
View From Out Here
In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 1
International Educator - March/April 2017 - From the Editor
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 3
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 4
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 5
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 6
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 7
International Educator - March/April 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Global Spotlight Cuba
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Insights
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 11
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Voices
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 13
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 14
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 15
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Lay of the Land: What Now?
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 17
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 18
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 19
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 20
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 21
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 22
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 23
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Finding Common Ground through Art Therapy
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 25
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 26
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 27
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 28
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 29
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 30
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 31
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Empowering Refugees Through Education
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 33
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 34
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 35
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 36
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 37
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 38
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Campus Profile: New York Institute of Technology
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 40
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 41
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 42
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 43
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 44
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 45
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 46
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Campus Snapshot: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 48
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 49
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 50
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 51
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 53
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 54
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 55
International Educator - March/April 2017 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 57
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 58
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 59
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Partnering
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 61
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 62
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 63
International Educator - March/April 2017 - View From Out Here
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 65
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 66
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 67
International Educator - March/April 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover4
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