International Educator - March/April 2017 - 65

2005 HRW/SAMAN ZIA-ZARIFI

An abandoned girls' school in Wardak province, vacated in late 2005 because students discovered an explosive device left inside. A threatening
letter ordering the school to close was left at the local mosque before the attempted attack.

and three girls, who never came back. The group, we
found, abducted boys to fight and abducted girls to cook
and clean, and for forced "marriage" and rape.
Where children and their schools are targeted, I'm
not surprised when parents tell me they have decided
to keep their children home. As a parent myself, I wonder what risks I would be willing to take. In a dangerous
climate, choosing not to send children to school can be
a wise choice. "One thing is culture," Laila told me. "The
other is security."
But many parents see the loss of education as the loss of
a future. Some are mothers, like the woman I met one stifling night in Sri Lanka. She had just fled with her family as
the government dropped bombs on her village in a rebelcontrolled area, and was being directed into an A-frame
tent-one of a dozen hastily set up on a playground-that
was already occupied by another family. Her question for
me? How her son could take his upcoming matriculation
exams and not miss the chance to continue studying.
Refugees from Syria and elsewhere landing on the
shores of Europe have told us that accessing education
was a key factor in their desperate decision to board
an overcrowded, dangerous boat. Adnan, 16, from
Damascus, told my colleague in Greece: "I cannot live in

Syria. I cannot continue my studies. We can't walk safely
on the street. We can't guarantee our lives. They attack
the schools, they attack the mosques. My school was
bombed. A plane attacked it at night. One month later,
we moved to Quneitra. A year after we arrived, that
school was destroyed too."
With some 250 million children living in countries
affected by conflict, according to the United Nations
Children's Fund (UNICEF), and Syrian families seeing
no hope for the future in neighboring countries where
half of Syrian refugee children are not in school, education should not be an accepted or inevitable casualty of
war.
Teachers, local education officials, and aid workers
who have lived with the problem for years are, in various
places, building higher walls, establishing home-based
schools, negotiating with local armed groups, or escorting teachers and students. But they need support-and
action-at higher levels.
They need credible investigations from their governments and prosecutions for unlawful attacks. Many also
need their armies to stop using their schools for military
purposes, such as for barracks, bases, training grounds,
and detention centers.
M A R + A P R .17 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - March/April 2017

From the Editor
In Brief
Global Spotlight Cuba
Insights
Voices
Feature: Lay of the Land: What Now?
Feature: Finding Common Ground through Art Therapy
Feature: Empowering Refugees Through Education
Campus Profile: New York Institute of Technology
Campus Snapshot: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
Partnering
View From Out Here
In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 1
International Educator - March/April 2017 - From the Editor
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 3
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 4
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 5
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 6
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 7
International Educator - March/April 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Global Spotlight Cuba
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Insights
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 11
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Voices
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 13
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 14
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 15
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Lay of the Land: What Now?
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 17
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 18
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 19
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 20
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 21
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 22
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 23
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Finding Common Ground through Art Therapy
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 25
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 26
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 27
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 28
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 29
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 30
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 31
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Feature: Empowering Refugees Through Education
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 33
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 34
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 35
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 36
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 37
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 38
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Campus Profile: New York Institute of Technology
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 40
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 41
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 42
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 43
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 44
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 45
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 46
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Campus Snapshot: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 48
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 49
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 50
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 51
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 53
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 54
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 55
International Educator - March/April 2017 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 57
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 58
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 59
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Partnering
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 61
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 62
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 63
International Educator - March/April 2017 - View From Out Here
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 65
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 66
International Educator - March/April 2017 - 67
International Educator - March/April 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - March/April 2017 - Cover4
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