International Educator - May/June 2017 - 6

FRONTLINES

■■ Restrictions on Students: "To guard

against adverse impacts on U.S. workers,
the rule requires terms and conditions of
a STEM practical training opportunity to
be commensurate with those applicable
to similarly situated U.S. workers.... The
student will not replace a full- or part-time,
temporary or permanent U.S. worker."
■■ Employer site visits, new employer
requirements, and limiting eligibility based
on school accreditation.
■■ Employers using the STEM OPT are
required to use E-Verify and "report
changes in the STEM OPT student's
employment" within five business days. The
new regulation also adds additional reporting requirements for students, and a greater
focus on training and student evaluations.
In its comment on the proposed rule,
NAFSA wrote, "NAFSA supports the
proposed rule extending STEM optional
practical training (OPT) to 24 months. The
new rule strikes a reasonable balance by
distributing requirements among all who
participate in the STEM OPT program:
foreign students, institutions of higher
education, and employers."

The Importance of OPT
"The best thing the U.S. government has
done on immigration is OPT to allow
international students a chance to stay
and work for a time after graduation,"
according to Michelle Zatlyn, a former
international student from Canada who
cofounded Cloudflare-a company that
helps websites with traffic and security-in
2009 with fellow Harvard Business School
graduate Matthew Prince. "It allowed me
to work with Matthew on the business
plan that helped create the company."
Zatlyn used the time on OPT to start
the company and obtain the H-1B status
that permitted her to remain in the United
States long-term. "If I hadn't obtained the
visa I would have gone back to Canada and
tried to work on Cloudflare from there,"
she said. "If that had happened, Cloudflare
would not be where it is today. It would
have clearly affected our development."
6  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M AY + J U N E .17

Today, Zatlyn is head of user experience
at the company, which is valued at $1 billion, serves more than 5 million websites,
and employs 365 people.

Other Countries Have
Better Policies for Retaining
International Students
"The United States is behind other countries in permitting international students
to find jobs after graduation and put their
talents to work in the country that educated them," concluded a recent analysis of
country immigration policies conducted
by Business Roundtable. The United States
ranked ninth out of the 10 countries examined-ahead of only Japan-in the category "Retention of International Students
Postgraduation." The reason for this poor
(relative) showing is not OPT but how
difficult it is for an international student-
even one with OPT employment-to gain
an H-1B visa or an employment-based
green card.
Australia, Germany, and Hong Kong
make it far easier than the United States
for international students to stay and work
after graduation. Australia provides international students an advantage over other
applicants for work visas, and Australia's
work visas do not have quotas that prevent
companies from hiring high-skilled foreign
nationals as in the United States. Germany
allows international students at German
universities to convert an internship at a
German company into an employment
visa and allows recent graduates six
months to seek jobs. In addition, European
Union (EU) students from EU universities
can work in any EU country without any
immigration processing.
Canada and France also facilitate the
process for international students to work
after graduation, with international graduate students in France able to change their
status to work for a company without any
test of the labor market. In Singapore,
according to attorneys, "an international
student pretty much can stay and work if
he or she wants to do so."

Looking Ahead
Sound rules on OPT are only part of a
broader reform agenda that should include
eliminating the per-country limit on
employment-based green cards, which
could lower the wait times for many
individuals mired in potentially a decade
or longer wait in immigration backlogs.
Exempting from the employment-based
green card limit individuals with advanced
STEM degrees and raising the employment-based green card limit would modernize the U.S. immigration system in light
of the tremendous demand for high-skilled
labor created by the technological revolution that started in the 1990s.
International students make valuable
contributions to the United States, but
without the proper policies in place, the
vast majority will return home. For those
who do so by choice, that is, of course,
part of the freedom all individuals enjoy.
However, forcing international students
to leave because the United States failed
to enact the proper policies to allow them
to stay and contribute their talents would
represent a tragic loss both for these individuals and the United States. ■
STUART ANDERSON, former staff director
of the Senate Immigration Subcommittee, is
executive director of the National Foundation
for American Policy, an Arlington, Virginia-based
policy research organization. He is the author of
the book Immigration (Greenwood, 2010).

SOURCES
"Open Doors Report 2016 Data Highlights," Institute of
International Education, November 14, 2016. Parts of this
article were adapted from Policy Recommendations on
Employment-Based Immigration for the New President
and Congress, NFAP Policy Brief, National Foundation for
American Policy, January 2017.
Washington Alliance of Technology Workers v. U.S.
Department of Homeland Security, Civil Action No.
14-529, United States District Court for the District of
Columbia, August 12, 2015, 156 F.Supp.3d 123 (2015).
81 Fed,Reg 13039, "Improving and Expanding Training
Opportunities for F-1 Nonimmigrant Students with
STEM Degrees and Cap-Gap Relief for All Eligible F-1
Students," final rule amending 8 CFR Parts 214 and 274a,
Department of Homeland Security, March 11, 2016.
NAFSA letter on the STEM OPT
http://www.nafsa.org/_/File/_/NAFSA_STEM_OPT_
Comment_Letter_11-13-2015.pdf


http://www.nafsa.org/_/File/_/NAFSA_STEM_OPT_Comment_Letter_11-13-2015.pdf http://www.nafsa.org/_/File/_/NAFSA_STEM_OPT_Comment_Letter_11-13-2015.pdf

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - May/June 2017

From the Editor
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Middle East
Quick Questions
High Tech, High Engagement
Principled, Pragmatic, Impactful
What Happens to Study Abroad Students
Campus Profi le: Internationalization at the University of Tampa
Campus Spotlight: Internationalization at East Carolina University
Education Abroad
International Enrollment
International Student Affair
Partnering
A View From Out Here
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 1
International Educator - May/June 2017 - From the Editor
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 3
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Frontlines
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 5
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 6
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 7
International Educator - May/June 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 9
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 10
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 11
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 12
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 13
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Global Spotlight: Middle East
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 15
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Quick Questions
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 17
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 18
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 19
International Educator - May/June 2017 - High Tech, High Engagement
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 21
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 22
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 23
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 24
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 25
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 26
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 27
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 28
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 29
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Principled, Pragmatic, Impactful
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 31
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 32
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 33
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 34
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 35
International Educator - May/June 2017 - What Happens to Study Abroad Students
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 37
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 38
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 39
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 40
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 41
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Campus Profi le: Internationalization at the University of Tampa
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 43
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 44
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 45
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 46
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 47
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 48
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 49
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 50
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 51
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 52
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 53
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Campus Spotlight: Internationalization at East Carolina University
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 55
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 56
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 57
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 58
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 59
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 61
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 62
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 63
International Educator - May/June 2017 - International Enrollment
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 65
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 66
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 67
International Educator - May/June 2017 - International Student Affair
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 69
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 70
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 71
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Partnering
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 73
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 74
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 75
International Educator - May/June 2017 - A View From Out Here
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 77
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 78
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 79
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Forum
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 81
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 82
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 83
International Educator - May/June 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20191112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20181112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180708gfclone
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180102_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20171112_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20171112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_2070910_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20161112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160304_fr
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20151112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20141112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20131112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20121112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20111112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110102
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com