International Educator - May/June 2017 - 74

PARTNERING

"That means there's a lot of debate
and exchange of ideas," says Matin, who
enrolled in the Zemi class on Japanese
international relations. "Zemi classes
rely on a close relationship between the
professor and the students. In my Zemi
class, we would regularly have dinner with
our professor as a class, and our professor
even invited us to his house on multiple
occasions for dinner. These [meetings]
allow learning to continue outside of
the classroom."

Increasing Student Mobility
Between the United States
and Japan
Partnerships between U.S. and Japanese
universities have been on the rise during
the last decade, thanks to the efforts of
numerous government and private initiatives in both nations. Japan is the United
States's strongest ally in Asia, and the
Pacific Rim nation is a critical economic
partner.
During the 1997-98 academic year,
the number of Japanese students studying in the United States reached its peak
of more than 45,000, according to the
Institute of International Education.
Around that same time, only 1,800 U.S.
students studied to Japan, according to
Pamela Fields, deputy secretary-general
for CULCON (United States-Japan
Conference on Cultural and Educational
Interchange), a binational advisory panel
to the U.S. and Japanese governments
that was established by President John F.
Kennedy. In recent years, however, the
number of U.S. students going to Japan
has tripled to nearly 6,000 while the number of Japanese students coming to the
United States has declined to fewer than
20,000 per year.
"If you're talking about building a
generation that understands the language
and the culture, and can build a network of
connections, this was distressing to both
the U.S. and Japan," Fields says.
TeamUp, a program of the U.S.Japan Bridging Foundation, promotes
74  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M AY + J U N E .17

partnerships between institutions in
both countries. The CULCON-inspired
initiative is supported by the U.S. Embassy
in Tokyo.
While partnerships boost better
understanding between the two cultures,
there are many practical reasons to set up
collaborations between institutions, Fields
says. For both U.S. and Japanese students,
these initiatives allow both sides to plan
how to transfer academic credits, keep
tuition costs affordable, and make suitable
housing arrangements.
"The idea is that if it's all figured out
in advance, it's a much smoother process for everyone involved," Fields says.
"Partnerships allow for innovations. They
can lead to faculty collaborative research
and engagement on an administrative level.
We have learned that there is tremendous
interest and will to set up partnerships-
both to give students an international
experience abroad and to internationalize the campus. Everybody is looking to
internationalize the way that their students
think because of the global environment in
which we're operating."
TeamUp has helped to facilitate numerous partnerships. Leeward Community
College in Hawaii, for example, set up
an articulation agreement with Josai
International University (JIU) in Japan.
Leeward students who earn an associate
degree are accepted as third-year students in JIU's English-language bachelor
of arts program. The University of Rhode
Island and Kōchi University developed a
student exchange program that grew out
of the longtime collaborative relationship between two professors at each of
the institutions.

One University,
Hundreds of Partnerships
Waseda University has been prolific in
setting up student and faculty exchanges, as
well as double degree programs, throughout the world. The university currently
has more than 600 agreements with
institutions in 85 countries, according to

Partnerships allow for
innovations. They can lead
to faculty collaborative
research and engagement
on an administrative level.
We have learned that there is
tremendous interest and will
to set up partnerships-both to
give students an international
experience abroad and to
internationalize the campus.
Toshinobu Toyama, Waseda's regional
manager for the Americas and manager
for the Global Leadership Program. Out of
more than 5,000 international students currently studying at Waseda, 226-just over 4
percent-are from the United States.
According to Toyama, the university's
long-term goals include expanding the
internationalization of its campus over
the next 20 years. The university is making plans to enroll 10,000 international
students (encompassing 20 percent of the
total student body) and to ensure that
every student has a study abroad experience of some kind. The university also
envisions hiring 400 non-Japanese faculty.
The university strives to be "Asia's premier
'model university', " as it bills itself, and
adaptable to a changing world. Continuing
existing partnerships and pursuing new
ones will be vital for achieving these goals.
"Though we are the most internationalized university in Japan, we cannot achieve
this reputation without collaboration with
our partners," Toyama writes in an e-mail.
"Our students are really appreciating being
in different countries and different cultures.
Understanding the differences and studying
together with non-Japanese students when
they are studying abroad or here in Waseda
are the true value of internationalization, in
addition to learning foreign languages." 
The increased number of collaborations
worldwide presents a challenge for some
of Waseda's oldest partnerships. Japan
Study, based at Earlham College in Indiana
and serving member institutions of the
Great Lakes Colleges Association and the
Associated Colleges of the Midwest, is one



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - May/June 2017

From the Editor
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Middle East
Quick Questions
High Tech, High Engagement
Principled, Pragmatic, Impactful
What Happens to Study Abroad Students
Campus Profi le: Internationalization at the University of Tampa
Campus Spotlight: Internationalization at East Carolina University
Education Abroad
International Enrollment
International Student Affair
Partnering
A View From Out Here
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 1
International Educator - May/June 2017 - From the Editor
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 3
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Frontlines
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 5
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 6
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 7
International Educator - May/June 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 9
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 10
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 11
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 12
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 13
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Global Spotlight: Middle East
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 15
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Quick Questions
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 17
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 18
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 19
International Educator - May/June 2017 - High Tech, High Engagement
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 21
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 22
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 23
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 24
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 25
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 26
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 27
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 28
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 29
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Principled, Pragmatic, Impactful
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 31
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 32
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 33
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 34
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 35
International Educator - May/June 2017 - What Happens to Study Abroad Students
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 37
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 38
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 39
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 40
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 41
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Campus Profi le: Internationalization at the University of Tampa
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 43
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 44
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 45
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 46
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 47
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 48
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 49
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 50
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 51
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 52
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 53
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Campus Spotlight: Internationalization at East Carolina University
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 55
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 56
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 57
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 58
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 59
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 61
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 62
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 63
International Educator - May/June 2017 - International Enrollment
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 65
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 66
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 67
International Educator - May/June 2017 - International Student Affair
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 69
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 70
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 71
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Partnering
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 73
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 74
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 75
International Educator - May/June 2017 - A View From Out Here
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 77
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 78
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 79
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Forum
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 81
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 82
International Educator - May/June 2017 - 83
International Educator - May/June 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - May/June 2017 - Cover4
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