International Educator - November/December 2017 - 20

Knutson Miller needed something that would draw in
many more.
So, in her retelling, Knutson Miller suggested an
alternative. "I said, 'Do you have a classroom somewhere
in Sao Paulo where a Fullerton professor could teach
your students for no fee, and you could send one of your
professors to do the same here? Yes? Great.' That's what
we want to do: creative reciprocity."
Fullerton eventually developed both a STEMfocused mobility partnership with Universidade
Estadual Paulista in Sao Paulo and an exchange agreement with Universidade Federal Fluminense in Rio de
Janeiro. Over a three-year period, Knutson Miller saw a

"They fill in gaps in our technical knowledge.
Nobody's an expert in everything."
97 percent increase in study abroad participation.
"We achieved our initial goal," Knutson Miller says
today. "And not just in terms of numbers but proportionally. Our first-generation and ethnic diversity percentages align with the campus percentages now."
The success of the work in Latin America also led
to collaborations with institutions in Mexico through
the Consortium for North American Higher Education
Collaboration. The area is a key region for Fullerton,
which is a designated Hispanic-Serving Institution, and
is trying to keep a variety of international education
options open to a broad array of students.
"We are a minority-serving institution," Knutson
Miller says. "A fairly large percentage of our student body
is Latino. The opportunity to have short-term programs
in Latin America is appealing because of proximity. It
reduces costs and also reduces jetlag. You can set up creative experiences that are even a few days in length that
give students a taste of study abroad opportunities."
Another way in which some universities are doing
more with less is by creating international agreements with other universities from the same country.
That's precisely what Washington State University did
with Michigan State University when the pair conducted a two-year demonstration program in Rwanda
in the 2000s.
20  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR N O V.+ D E C .17

"There was a call for proposals to do this higher education grant to help the University of Rwanda develop a
master's in agribusiness," remembers Colleen Taugher,
the associate director of global research and engagement
for Washington State. "I knew [Michigan State] would
go for it. They're bigger. They have so much experience,
but I really wanted to be a part of it."
Instead of applying for the grant outright, Taugher
proposed a plan. "I called them and said I have a lot of
ideas. If we partner, I won't compete with you." Taugher
says she offered to work with the other university collaboratively instead, and they agreed.
Michigan State won the grant and led the effort to
develop the master's degree program at the University of
Rwanda. For two years, Michigan State and Washington
State sent over three students each year to gain experience working with coffee farmers in the country, as well
as with undergraduate peers from the host institution.
"We love to partner with other universities," Taugher
says. "They fill in gaps in our technical knowledge.
Nobody's an expert in everything."
For programs like this one that require so many
resources and involve so few students, working with
other universities to lighten the load can make the process more viable, Taugher says. When universities try to
pull off a tiny international program or launch a facultyled program on an obscure research topic, "they probably can't get enough students to make it fly," Taugher
says. "By pooling resources, they can make it work."

Going Big by Keeping It Small
Perhaps the largest international partnership gaining
ground at the moment is the University of Arizona's
micro-campus concepts, with more than a dozen
already operating around the world. The university is
betting heavily on the idea that offering dual degrees
from Arizona and each host university is a more sustainable model than developing international branch
campuses fully owned by Arizona. Instead of building
satellite campuses, Arizona borrows classroom space
at university campuses abroad, and Arizona professors teach local students-or Arizona students who are
studying abroad. Students pay tuition based on local
rates, not on those in Tucson.
The concept, says Brent White, University of Arizona
vice-provost of international education, originally came
from a desire to offer an international legal dual degree,
but soon evolved into a broader effort. Recruiting



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - November/December 2017

From the Desk of
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Iran
Quick Questions
Feature: The New Why of Partnering: International Partnerships Are Expanding Their Reach and Goals
Feature: Partnering Case Studies: Leveraging Unconventionality
Feature: Doing Well by Doing Good: Social Entrepreneurship is Evolving to Meet New Realities
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
Feature: A Healthy Balance
Feature: Mental Health: Leveraging Resources
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 1
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 2
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 3
International Educator - November/December 2017 - From the Desk of
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 5
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Frontlines
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 7
International Educator - November/December 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 9
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 10
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 11
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Global Spotlight: Iran
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 13
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Quick Questions
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 15
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Feature: The New Why of Partnering: International Partnerships Are Expanding Their Reach and Goals
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 17
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 18
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 19
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 20
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 21
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Feature: Partnering Case Studies: Leveraging Unconventionality
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 23
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 24
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 25
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 26
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 27
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Feature: Doing Well by Doing Good: Social Entrepreneurship is Evolving to Meet New Realities
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 29
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 30
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 31
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 32
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 33
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 35
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 36
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 37
International Educator - November/December 2017 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 39
International Educator - November/December 2017 - International Enrollment
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 41
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 42
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 43
International Educator - November/December 2017 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 45
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Forum
International Educator - November/December 2017 - 47
International Educator - November/December 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - November/December 2017 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20191112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20181112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180708gfclone
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180102_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20171112_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20171112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_2070910_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20161112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160304_fr
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20151112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20141112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20131112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20121112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20111112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110102
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com