International Educator - March/April 2018 - 29

As the vice provost for international affairs at Lehigh University,
Matherly has subsequently convened an international student
career development task force that will be charged with finding
ways to support Lehigh's 1,100 international students in their professional development. "We're not just adapting the programs that
we already do for our domestic students. We are starting by looking
at the needs of this population and thinking about how to design
distinct programs and services to meet those needs," she says.
Matherly sees career services as part and parcel of the admissions and recruitment pipeline: "One of the things we're discussing at Lehigh is the very particular relationship between our ability
to recruit and attract top international students and their expectations to be able to find a job after they graduate."
While still currently under development, Lehigh's career
services that specifically target international students include
job shadowing, extending the use of curricular practical training
(CPT), and leveraging their international alumni network to create a mentoring program.

Dealing With Uncertainty About
Postgraduate Training and Employment
The increased focus on future job prospects for international
students at Lehigh and other institutions coincides with growing
uncertainty about immigration and postgraduation employment
options in the United States. While the value of a U.S. degree in
getting a job is often cited as a factor in international students' decisionmaking, the current political climate has given the conversation
new urgency, especially as countries like Canada have recently taken
steps to make education a path to eventual citizenship. A recent
survey by World Education Services (WES) found that 73 percent
of international students said the ability to gain U.S. work experience before returning home or going to another country was an
important factor in their decision to study in the United States.
In April 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump issued an executive order, "Buy American and Hire American," which suggested a
tightening of rules related to the hiring of foreign skilled workers
through the H-1B visa scheme. U.S. officials have subsequently
increased the scrutiny of foreign workers and some countries,
such as India, report increased visa denial rates since the order.
There has also been concern among the higher education community that the current administration might attempt to rescind
President Barack Obama's two-year extension of optional practical
training (OPT), which allows international students in the science,
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields to work
in the United States for up to 36 months after graduation.
"There are a lot of questions about what's going to happen with
the H-1B program and the OPT STEM extensions. Some students
who are doing STEM degrees are wondering if OPT will even be
in place when they finish their degrees," Matherly says.
The effects of the uncertainty are being felt across all types of
higher education institutions. According to the 2017 Open Doors

data from the Institute for International Education (IIE), there are
10,000 fewer new international students studying in the United States
in 2017-18 than there were in the previous academic year. This is the
first time new enrollments have declined in the last 12 years.
"In keeping with the national trends, we've seen the same
decrease. This really boils down to the fact that students have
concerns about investing time, money, and effort with a diminishing sense of the potential for opportunity to work in the United
States at the end," says Ana M. Rossetti, assistant dean of academic administration and student affairs at the Illinois Institute of
Technology (IIT) in Chicago.
Students are not the only ones experiencing anxiety. Career
service professionals have seen an increased hesitance among the
employers they work with. According to the National Association
of Colleges and Employers (NACE) Job Outlook 2018 report, the
percentage of employers that expect to hire international students
has dropped for three years in a row to 23.4 percent in 2017. In
contrast, more than a third of employers planned to hire international students in 2015.
Some experts say this points to the need to prepare students
for the possibilities of going home. The New York Institute of
Technology (NYIT), which won the 2015 Simon Award for
Campus Internationalization, leverages its alumni network to
help students find job and internship opportunities in their own
countries or globally. In China, NYIT also works with other U.S.
institutions to organize career fairs in Beijing and Shanghai.

Employer Outreach Key to Creating
Opportunities for International Students
Universities and colleges have recognized the need to educate
both employers and students on immigration regulations and
postgraduation work opportunities in the United States. A common practice at many institutions is to bring in an immigration
attorney who explains the process in detail.
"A lot of employers are not really sure about what it means to
sponsor students. So we invite employers to come and talk to the
students and also invite an immigration attorney to talk to both of
these groups and answer the questions that students and employers may have around OPT and H-1B. The attorney demystifies
the entire sponsorship process and then [both employers and
students] feel a little more comfortable about the process," says
Shahzad Hussain, senior associate director of the Stuart School of
Business Career Management Center at IIT.
Hussain says they also hold regular CPT and OPT workshops
for international students so they can answer any questions
employers might have about regulations during interviews.
"Knowledge of CPT, OPT, and H-1B definitely helps the international students and alumni in advocating for themselves
with potential employers. There are several employers who are
unaware of the CPT and OPT provisions of the F-1 student visa
and employers generally misunderstand that any time they have
M A R .+ A P R . 2018 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

29  



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - March/April 2018

From the Desk of
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Canada
Quick Questions
Feature: Using Technology to Reach Students Where They Are
Feature: Global Connections, Staying Local: Online International Education Continues to Grow As an Alternative—and Support—to In-Person Study
Feature: Getting to Work How Career Services Offices Are Helping Students Launch Their Careers
Feature: How Assessment Approaches Measure Up
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 1
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 2
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 3
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 4
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 5
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 6
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 7
International Educator - March/April 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Frontlines
International Educator - March/April 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 11
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 12
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Global Spotlight: Canada
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 14
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 15
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 17
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Using Technology to Reach Students Where They Are
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 19
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 20
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 21
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 22
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 23
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Global Connections, Staying Local: Online International Education Continues to Grow As an Alternative—and Support—to In-Person Study
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 25
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 26
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 27
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Getting to Work How Career Services Offices Are Helping Students Launch Their Careers
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 29
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 30
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 31
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: How Assessment Approaches Measure Up
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 33
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 34
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 35
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 36
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 37
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 39
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 41
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 43
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 45
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Forum
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 47
International Educator - March/April 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20191112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20190102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20181112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180708gfclone
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180102_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20180102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20171112_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20171112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_2070910_supp
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20170102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20161112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160304_fr
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20160102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20151112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20150102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20141112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20140102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20131112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20130102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20121112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20120102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20111112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nafsa/ie_20110102
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com