International Educator - March/April 2018 - 40

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AFFAIRS
By David Tobenkin

Rebounding From Academic Probation
at a higher education institution is a challenging and emotion-charged experience for any student, but particularly so for international students.
REBOUNDING FROM ACADEMIC PROBATION

Yet international educators say that adoption of best
practices by colleges and universities can help increase the
odds that international students will rise to the challenge.

Understanding
Academic Probation
and Its Implications
International offices should make
sure that their staff thoroughly
understand the ground rules
for academic probation at their
institution. This includes being
familiar with standards for entering, staying on, and
exiting probation, as well as the visa status, academic,
and funding consequences for students on probation,
says Amy Azuma, an international student and scholar
adviser at the Berkeley International Office of the
University of California-Berkeley.
"At UC-Berkeley, policies around probation, dismissal,
and readmission vary between undergraduate colleges-
and policies may change from semester to semester,"
says Azuma. "Given the variation, it's important for our
international office to collaborate closely with academic
advisers to ensure that we receive information about
F/J visa international students at risk of dismissal. With
outreach from the international office, academic advisers
better understand the complexity of planning to address
both academic recovery and maintaining visa status."
While academic probation does not directly affect a
student's visa status, suspension, which in some programs
can result from a second semester on probation, does, as
F-1 visa students must remain enrolled full time to maintain their immigration status. For J-1 visa holders, too,
involuntary suspension or termination can result in loss of
immigration status. In addition, academic probation can
affect eligibility for grants and loans, an area that international offices also may need to identify and monitor.

The Causes of Academic Probation
Understanding the cause or causes of academic probation can be important to helping students improve. Jun
Liu, PhD, professor of linguistics, vice provost for global
40  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M A R .+ A P R . 2018

affairs, and dean of international academic programs
and services at Stony Brook University says top causes
of international student academic probations at his
institution include poor academic standing/low GPA,
academic dishonesty, financial difficulties, issues related
to mental and psychological health, and low English
language proficiency.
Academic environments on U.S. campuses also tend
to be far less structured than in international students'
countries of origin. In China, for example, cohorts tend to
take the same classes together, there are class leaders who
may collect key papers and assignments and take care of
academic support details for other students, and teachers
also take care of administrative issues for students, says
Jianyang Mei, a doctoral candidate and cultural assistant
with the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative
at Michigan State University (MSU) who supports the
institution's Chinese international student population.

Steps to Take Before Probation Occurs
Many say efforts to recover from academic probation
begin with overall outreach and support efforts that
begin long before probation occurs. Such steps include
orientations prior to commencing studies that outline
academic expectations and consequences.
"First we want to introduce international students to
the ISSS's student service model," say Alisa Eland, associate director of international student and scholar services
and head of counseling and advising at the University of
Minnesota. "We utilize a holistic model of student service with a variety of approaches to meet the needs of
our clientele, including advising, counseling, programs,
training, and leadership opportunities."
International educators must also make sure there
is a game plan and secure adequate resources across
their institutions to be able to address the needs of those
students who go on academic probation when the time
arises. "We don't do all the work," Azuma says. "If the
main issue is that it is an engineering student who is failing engineering classes, for example, we work with career
advisers to reassess their major and to evaluate alternate
pathways through resources at the career center."



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - March/April 2018

From the Desk of
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Canada
Quick Questions
Feature: Using Technology to Reach Students Where They Are
Feature: Global Connections, Staying Local: Online International Education Continues to Grow As an Alternative—and Support—to In-Person Study
Feature: Getting to Work How Career Services Offices Are Helping Students Launch Their Careers
Feature: How Assessment Approaches Measure Up
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 1
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 2
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 3
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 4
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 5
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 6
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 7
International Educator - March/April 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Frontlines
International Educator - March/April 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 11
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 12
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Global Spotlight: Canada
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 14
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 15
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 17
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Using Technology to Reach Students Where They Are
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 19
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 20
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 21
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 22
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 23
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Global Connections, Staying Local: Online International Education Continues to Grow As an Alternative—and Support—to In-Person Study
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 25
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 26
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 27
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Getting to Work How Career Services Offices Are Helping Students Launch Their Careers
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 29
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 30
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 31
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: How Assessment Approaches Measure Up
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 33
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 34
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 35
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 36
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 37
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 39
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 41
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 43
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 45
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Forum
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 47
International Educator - March/April 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover4
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