International Educator - March/April 2018 - 41

Steps to Take Following Entry into
Academic Probation
Many international educators emphasize the importance of meeting with students entering probation
on a one-on-one basis as soon as possible, given that
exploring avenues to address related issues may require
extensive planning and readjustments.
"We require one-on-one meetings with all students on
academic probation in order for them to continue their
studies at Stony Brook," says Stony Brook's Liu. "We also
strongly recommend students participate in programs
offered by the Academic Success and Tutoring Center,
including a peer-assisted learning program. We also have
a required mid-semester workshop with all international
students currently on first semester probation to discuss
academic expectations, campus resources, and F-1 visa
implications for not doing well in the semester."
Many institutions have special programs in which
international students are expected to participate. "We
focus on providing a 17-week plan of what it means to
responsibly manage probationary status to clear them
from probation-because academic probation is not a
simple academic or administrative process," Azuma says.
"There is a guiding function and an oversight function
in our approach-we make check points to prevent
students from falling through the cracks. We also use a
developmental approach, improving motivation, enhancing study skills, and connecting with support across
campus."
"At MSU, students who are placed on probation or
final probation are expected to participate in the Success
Training for Academic Recovery (STAR) Program,
which was launched in 2014," says Charlie Liu, assistant
director of student affairs at MSU's College of Social

Science. "The program is designed to provide students
with a college contact and support network to help as
they progress through the semester in which they are on
probation. The student is expected to attend workshops,
meet with a success coach, and connect with faculty and
other resources throughout the semester."
Some institutions are creating new positions to
address the problem. Such efforts can have positive
results, says Lillybeth N. Sasis, assistant dean of international programs and global engagement at California
State University-Fullerton's College of Engineering and
Computer Science, whose position was created in part
to address retention issues with international students.
In fall 2015, 170 international students-or roughly 35
percent of international students-at the College of
Engineering and Computer Science were on academic
probation, Sasis says. A student success campaign that
Sasis instituted helped reduce that number to 66 students on probation in fall 2016.
Addressing shame and anxiety when advising international students who are on academic probation is important. Without help, students may want to simply ignore
the problem, or just hope that they'll do better the next
semester, notes Elizabeth Matthews, assistant director of
MSU's Office for International Students and Scholars.
"To help students prepare for the conversation, I
have coached students on how to tell their parents that
they have not done well in school," Matthews says. "This
is a new experience for many, as it may be the first time
they, as an adult, choose to talk to their parents about a
serious situation." n
DAVID TOBENKIN is a freelance writer based in the greater
Washington, D.C., area.

M A R .+ A P R . 2018 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

41  



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - March/April 2018

From the Desk of
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Canada
Quick Questions
Feature: Using Technology to Reach Students Where They Are
Feature: Global Connections, Staying Local: Online International Education Continues to Grow As an Alternative—and Support—to In-Person Study
Feature: Getting to Work How Career Services Offices Are Helping Students Launch Their Careers
Feature: How Assessment Approaches Measure Up
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 1
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 2
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 3
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 4
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 5
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 6
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 7
International Educator - March/April 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Frontlines
International Educator - March/April 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 11
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 12
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Global Spotlight: Canada
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 14
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 15
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 17
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Using Technology to Reach Students Where They Are
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 19
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 20
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 21
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 22
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 23
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Global Connections, Staying Local: Online International Education Continues to Grow As an Alternative—and Support—to In-Person Study
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 25
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 26
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 27
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: Getting to Work How Career Services Offices Are Helping Students Launch Their Careers
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 29
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 30
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 31
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Feature: How Assessment Approaches Measure Up
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 33
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 34
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 35
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 36
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 37
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 39
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 41
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 43
International Educator - March/April 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 45
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Forum
International Educator - March/April 2018 - 47
International Educator - March/April 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - March/April 2018 - Cover4
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