International Educator - May/June 2018 - 24

CHECKLIST

Best Practices for Guiding
Student Learning Through a
Global Citizenship Lens

1

Help students identify their own cultural identity. This will
allow students to better compare their values and beliefs
with those of their host environment.

2

Prepare students for the expectations, customs,
values, and beliefs they are likely to encounter in a host
environment.

3

Prepare students for communication styles and
preferences of their host culture. Communication is the key
to all relationships and experiences.

4

Set realistic expectations for students. This will differ
between cultures and vary depending on the amount of
time spent abroad.

5

Prepare students to experience culture shock and provide
them with coping techniques to reflect and internalize the
experience. Once such technique is Hess's "action-reflectionresponse strategy."

6

Explicitly teach social justice concepts. Until students
understand that oppression, dominance, power, and
privilege exist, they cannot reflect on those concepts and
eventually internalize them.

7

Model self-reflection and critical analysis. Students who
have never engaged in these practices do not inherently
understand how to self-reflect or critically analyze. These
concepts must be explicitly taught.

8

Encourage students to feel discomfort, speak their truth,
and engage in the honest dialogue that will result in
transformation.

future leaders who are equipped to act as catalysts for positive change,
make ethical decisions based on fact that benefit all constituents, and
become responsive local, national, and world leaders.
With this tailored experience, students are better able to understand who they are; through self-exploration prior to departure, they
can more easily realize the potential maximization of immersing into
another culture. The predeparture curriculum's purpose is to offer
students the ability to frame experiences, yet unintended benefits,
such as self-analysis, are also highly likely. This curriculum can help
students as they confront and process experiences that may challenge their internal belief systems, leading to critical analyses of longheld values that may or may not be congruent with the local culture.
Currently under development at the University of North
Georgia in Gainesville, Ga., is such a program. Set to launch
this summer to about 400 outbound students, the program's
24  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M AY + J U N. 2018

researchers are optimistic that those who are exposed to the social
justice curriculum will have an enhanced experience abroad and
deepen their cultural understandings compared with their peers
who do not receive exposure to the curriculum.
If appropriately prepared prior to departure, students can maximize their time abroad and experience perspective-altering shifts
in disposition. While these programs have a shorter exposure
time, the experience could be just as impactful if a skilled educator
sets the stage, fully prepares students prior to departure, and crafts
an in-country experience that allows students to interact with the
local community.
Duarte Silva, Stanford University's executive director of the
California Foreign Language Program in the College of Education's
Graduate School, prepares his students for abroad experiences by
ensuring they are aware of the pressing social issues in each host
country-especially those not mentioned or covered accurately by
the media-and their relevance to societal views.
"Students arrive and are shocked about events in the country," says Silva. "We try to prepare students to be able to engage
in conversations with their host families and peers." Stanford's
Institute for International Studies has also played a role in Silva's
programming, he says: "over the last 20 years they have made a
tremendous impact in internationalizing the general curriculum,
especially at the undergraduate level."
Stanford is not alone in its quest to create globally competent
leaders. Faculty from the University of Wisconsin-Madison are
working to normalize global curricula so that students are motivated to increase their global competencies. In addition to traditional offerings, the university implemented international learning
communities, certificates in areas of study related to international
curricula, interdisciplinary international curriculum development,
and both immersion and intensive summer language programs.
The University of North Carolina has implemented a Global
Ready school designation and created a Globally Competent
Teaching Continuum for public schools to prepare students prior
to university entrance.

Modeling Respect for Future Leaders
While highly structured, thoughtfully curated predeparture
curriculum is critical, educators themselves have an important
role to play in students' experiences abroad. If students have a
theoretical framework on which to pin their experiences, an
understanding of self prior to departure, and an educator to guide
them through their reflection in country, they will likely have a
more meaningful experience than their peers who had to process
their experiences on their own.
It is critical that international educators promote a culture of
knowledge and respect for all cultures and perspectives, especially
those with which they disagree or that create fear. It is crucial to
professional success-as well as the future success of students-
that they are taught how to push past fear, explore stereotypes,



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - May/June 2018

From the Desk of
In Brief
Global Spotlight: China
Quick Questions
Feature: Global Citizenship 2.0: Supporting a New Breed of Stewards to Confront a Changing Reality
Feature: Lifelong Learning: Higher Education for a World of Speed and Scale
Feature: Internationalization Best Practices: Lessons Learned
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2018 - BB1
International Educator - May/June 2018 - BB2
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 1
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 2
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 3
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 4
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 5
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 6
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 7
International Educator - May/June 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - May/June 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 10
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 11
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 12
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 13
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 14
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Global Spotlight: China
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 17
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 18
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 19
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Feature: Global Citizenship 2.0: Supporting a New Breed of Stewards to Confront a Changing Reality
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 21
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 22
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 23
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 24
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 25
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 26
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 27
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Feature: Lifelong Learning: Higher Education for a World of Speed and Scale
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 29
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 30
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 31
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 32
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 33
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Feature: Internationalization Best Practices: Lessons Learned
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 35
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 36
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 37
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 38
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 39
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 41
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 42
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 43
International Educator - May/June 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 45
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 46
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 47
International Educator - May/June 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 49
International Educator - May/June 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 51
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 52
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 53
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Forum
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 55
International Educator - May/June 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover4
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