International Educator - May/June 2018 - 32

O ur s tOries
Byron Auguste
As a child, I attended parochial and public schools in Detroit, Michigan,
and Phoenix, Arizona. In college, I studied many fields, but knew I wanted
to explore the discipline of economics more deeply, but was not sure
whether to pursue a doctoral degree or a "terminal" master's degree,
which was the choice I faced in the United States. Looking abroad, the
postgraduate education system in England included master's programs
(MPhil) in which I could complete advanced coursework-then mutually
decide whether to pursue a doctorate by researching and writing a
dissertation. After two years, I did pursue and earn a doctoral degree,
but would I have made that four-year commitment all at once? Access to
international education options reduced the risk I perceived, allowed me
to pursue my learning on my own terms, and unlocked my full potential.

Karan Chopra
I went to a high school in Ghana that is well respected but was not a
feeder to any particular higher education institution. In order to study in
the United States, I needed a way to demonstrate my aptitude, a way to
learn what it would take to demonstrate that aptitude, and support with
the application process. Luckily for me, there was the SAT, a prep book
for the SAT in the high school library, and a family friend studying in the
United States who was willing to mentor me on the college application
process. I later found myself studying electrical engineering at Georgia
Tech, but the factors that led me to this are not systematically available
to millions of people today.

economy, however, personalization, rapid reconfiguration of systems, and ubiquitous innovation is essential. As a result, hallmarks of liberal education such as
critical thinking, clear communication, and research are
vital for all workers.
Institutions of higher education can contribute
to developing and scaling these solutions with their
expertise, resources, and authority. Adopting methods
like these at scale wouldn't just benefit society at large-it
would benefit colleges and universities in the long term.
In a time of declining enrollment for higher education
institutions in the United States, these solutions would
expand the revenue base. The upside for global institutions is that a more effective education system could
draw more dollars from sources like government agencies, alumni networks, and impact investors that respond
to quality outcomes and could fill crucial funding needs.
Because of the rapidly evolving and iterative nature
of the new knowledge economy, effective solutions will
need to dramatically reassess how and when people turn
to educational institutions. Rather than viewing higher
education as a discrete event that occurs between the
ages of 18 and 24 and prepares students for their entire
working lives, a long-term view is needed in which an
educational journey runs parallel to a career. Students,
32  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR M AY + J U N. 2018

educators, and employers can substantially benefit by
updating their definition to reflect our modern reality:
since the economy is constantly changing, jobs are
too. And as jobs transform, people need to constantly
acquire new skills in order to keep up.
Supporting programs that make it easier to continually learn will help immensely in making higher education more responsive to a person's lifelong education
needs. Southern New Hampshire University, through its
College for America (CFA) program, has partnered with
more than 100 employers and community organizations
around the country to offer working adults affordable education programs that are compatible with the
lifelong learning model. CFA offers competency-based
education, predicating a degree on the mastery of workplace-relevant skills rather than on credit hours. The
entire CFA program is designed to fit into, support, and
improve the life of a working adult, with flexible online
courses that make CFA a practical program for people
at all stages of their lives and careers.

Learning for the Changing Demands
of Today and Tomorrow
Cooperation between employers and educators should
play a key role in any solution that seeks to provide
students with access to an education that prepares them
for lifelong learning and a meaningful career in the new
economy. Institutions of higher education can better serve
their students and ensure positive outcomes by reinforcing the feedback loop with employers. These institutions
can and should communicate directly with employers to
discover which skills will be most likely to land graduates
a well-paying job and put them on a rewarding career trajectory-then relay that message to students and encourage them to study those in-demand fields.
Aside from the individuals themselves, employers
are perhaps the biggest beneficiaries of institutions that
train new talent, but all too often, a false distinction is
made between discussions on how to make education
more effective in preparing students for their careers
and discussions about how to connect more people with
meaningful employment opportunities. Rather than
considering these two complementary components as
discrete goals, employers should work with education
providers to signal which skills are most valuable for
today's and tomorrow's careers.
In Nigeria, the West Africa Vocational Education
(WAVE) partnered with Lagos State Office of the
Special Adviser on Education to deliver education for
market-relevant and in-demand skills in Lagos, Nigeria's
commercial capital with an estimated population of 17



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - May/June 2018

From the Desk of
In Brief
Global Spotlight: China
Quick Questions
Feature: Global Citizenship 2.0: Supporting a New Breed of Stewards to Confront a Changing Reality
Feature: Lifelong Learning: Higher Education for a World of Speed and Scale
Feature: Internationalization Best Practices: Lessons Learned
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2018 - BB1
International Educator - May/June 2018 - BB2
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 1
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 2
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 3
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 4
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 5
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 6
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 7
International Educator - May/June 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - May/June 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 10
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 11
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 12
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 13
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 14
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Global Spotlight: China
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 17
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 18
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 19
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Feature: Global Citizenship 2.0: Supporting a New Breed of Stewards to Confront a Changing Reality
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 21
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 22
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 23
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 24
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 25
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 26
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 27
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Feature: Lifelong Learning: Higher Education for a World of Speed and Scale
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 29
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 30
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 31
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 32
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 33
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Feature: Internationalization Best Practices: Lessons Learned
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 35
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 36
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 37
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 38
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 39
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 41
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 42
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 43
International Educator - May/June 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 45
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 46
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 47
International Educator - May/June 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 49
International Educator - May/June 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 51
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 52
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 53
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Forum
International Educator - May/June 2018 - 55
International Educator - May/June 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - May/June 2018 - Cover4
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