International Educator - July/August 2018 - 21

Financial Needs and Disparities
Inflows of global students from emerging regions such
as Africa and a broadening middle class in some sending
countries are contributing to greater financial needs
among the pool of international students.
"We've seen a higher number of applications
of students with less financial support and higher
financial need," says Nazanin Tork, associate director
of admission at Agnes Scott College. "The golden
ticket is the United States, but there's going to come
a point where it may not be the best financial option
for students." That projection rings true even today
as the number of internationally focused institutions
continue to grow in countries like China, providing
lower-cost regional alternatives to many students
seeking an international experience.
For many U.S. institutions facing a smaller-and
at times, more financially strapped-pool of potential
domestic students to draw from, this presents a double

challenge. Schools offering more financial support to
domestic students have less money to support international students, and the decrease in incoming tuition
also means fewer resources for international students.
Kansas State University President for Student Life
and Dean of Students Pat Bosco calls the combined
financial pressures from domestic and international
student pools "a perfect demographic storm" this
past fall. Fewer high school students from Kansas are
attending college, Bosco says, and while the institution
saw increased numbers of graduate students last fall,
international enrollments were down.
As U.S. higher education has become increasingly
bifurcated between the elite, highly ranked institutions
and those that do not fit that profile, the impact of that
gap on international enrollment continues to grow,
raising questions about sustainability.
The average decrease of 7 percent in newly enrolled
international students across U.S. institutions in fall

Around the World at a Glance
Where Students Are Coming From
China. China remains the largest sending country and is expected to remain
so through 2017. However, the rate
of growth of outbound students has
fallen steadily from nearly 20 percent
in 2014-15 to just more than 12 percent
in 2016-17. A recent trend showing that
the number of students returning to
China after completing their studies has
grown by more than 130 percent since
2011 bears watching.
India. Projected to remain just behind
China as the second leading sending
country, India's growth in outbound
students peaked in 2009-10 and has
been under 10 percent since 2015-16.
Immigration shifts in the United
States and United Kingdom have led
to significant enrollment growth of
Indian students in Canada (40 percent
between 2013 and 2015) and Australia
(50 percent between 2013 and 2015).
Nepal. Following a sudden upturn in
outbound students earlier this decade,
enrollment in U.S. institutions surged
20 percent in 2017. One-quarter of the
nation's population is between ages 15
and 24.
Bangladesh. This densely populated
nation is even younger-34 percent are
15 years in age or younger. Students

studying abroad tripled between 2010
and 2013, and the nation is looking at
distance-learning initiatives to serve its
growing college-age population.

greatest increase in student interest in a 2017 survey of international
agents, according to ICEF's 2017 Agent
Barometer survey.

Nigeria. With a rebounding economy
following a currency shock and decline
in oil prices, growth in globally mobile
students is expected to lag behind only
China, India, and Pakistan through 2027.

Australia. The nation's coordinated
strategy for international education,
which was released in 2016, contributed
to a 15 percent increase in October 2017.

Brazil. In 2017, Brazil formally canceled
a key scholarship program that was
first suspended in late 2015. Scaledback scholarship programs now
focus on postgraduate students and
research programs.
Saudi Arabia. As cuts in the nation's
signature scholarship program continue, so do the number of first-time
study abroad enrollments among Saudi
students. The number of Saudis with
U.S. student visas dropped by nearly 20
percent in 2016.

Where Students Are Going
Canada. Canada hosted a record
495,000 foreign students in 2017-a
41 percent increase from 2015 and
surpassing its 2022 goal of 450,000
international students five years ahead
of schedule. Canada offers a clearer
path to citizenship than the United
States in many cases and saw the

Germany. Germany met its goal of
hosting 350,000 international students
by 2020 in 2017.
United Kingdom. The ultimate impact
of Brexit, after a record 500,000 international students in 2015-16, remains
unclear. Data for 2017 show declines in
applications and acceptances within
the European Union, but a 2.8 percent
increase in applicants from outside
the region, with even stronger non-EU
growth (12 percent) in the initial cycle
of 2018 applications.
China. Even as outbound growth continues, China is following through on its
2030 goal of establishing 16 globally
ranked domestic institutions. By 2016,
it was second only to the United States
in the total number of top 500 ranked
institutions, with 54 institutions to the
United States's 137. International students increased 11.4 percent in 2016 to
more than 440,000.
Sources: ICEF Monitor, IIE, British Council

J U L + AU G . 2018 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

21  



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - July/August 2018

From the Desk of
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Brazil
Quick Questions
Feature: A Shock to the System
Feature: Something Old, Something New
Feature: Building on Strengths
Feature: Weathering the Storm
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - July/August 2018 - GF1
International Educator - July/August 2018 - GF2
International Educator - July/August 2018 - GF3
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 2
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 3
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 4
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 5
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 6
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 7
International Educator - July/August 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - July/August 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 10
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 11
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 12
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 13
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 14
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Global Spotlight: Brazil
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 17
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: A Shock to the System
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 19
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 20
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 21
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 22
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 23
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: Something Old, Something New
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 25
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 26
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 27
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 28
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 29
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 30
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 31
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: Building on Strengths
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 33
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 34
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 35
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 36
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 37
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: Weathering the Storm
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 39
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 40
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 41
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 42
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 43
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 45
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 46
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 47
International Educator - July/August 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 49
International Educator - July/August 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 51
International Educator - July/August 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 53
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Forum
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 55
International Educator - July/August 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover4
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