International Educator - July/August 2018 - 53

Sticker Shock
In addition to rethinking communications approaches, education
leaders in the United States may need to adjust tuition rates for
international students to improve enrollment numbers.
"There's a huge risk on the horizon that the stream of international students [into the United States] isn't sustainable over
the next two decades," Mrig says. "Other countries are already
investing in premier higher education institutions to encourage students to stay in their home country and to attract those
from other countries. I think in response, U.S. institutions may
have to-and some are already doing this-discount tuitions for
international students."
To keep both domestic and international students coming, institutions need to rely less on public appropriations and,
instead, find creative ways to get private funding, says Sanaghan.
Partnering with organizations to provide education in exchange
for funds is one approach.
"Let's say a university president in the Philadelphia area goes
to a local business and says, 'We can give a world-class education
to the top 100 of your employees. We'll have faculty come to
the company and teach classes and work with you to design the
curriculum. If writing's a problem, we have three professors here
who are award-winning writers,'" he says. "If employees have problems speaking in public, you make sure Toastmasters comes to the
company and teaches them how to speak better. You make it easy
for them to say yes."

Meeting Employers' Demands
Those who lead international education programs at U.S. institutions are perhaps best positioned to address another challenge

DANA WILKIE is a freelance writer based in Pennsylvania.

J U L + AU G . 2018 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

SHUTTERSTOCK / ONEINCHPUNCH

University leaders can't control most factors that
contribute to declining enrollments, but there are
practical steps they can take to aid in recruitment.

to enrollment dips: ensuring that international students are
equipped-academically, culturally, and socially-to work in a
global marketplace after graduation.
For instance, Mrig says, the classic four-year college degree-
with its general education requirements, teacher-led instruction,
and siloed disciplines-may no longer prepare graduates to
succeed in an increasingly connected and interdependent world
where geographic boundaries are increasingly arbitrary. He advocates that university leaders strategically invest more time, money,
and manpower in partnerships with institutions in other nations
that share, for instance, similar research goals.
Faculty need to train students on how to network across
borders and collaborate with multinational teams. And that
means university leaders should push to include international
education programs in the mainstream curricula at any institution, and not as just "some appendage that flops around out
there on the corner of campus," says Professor John K. Hudzik
of Michigan State University, who is past president and board
chairman of NAFSA, past president of the Association of
International Education Administrators, and a NAFSA 2018-
2019 Senior Fellow.
"If you're working a high-speed, computer-driven drill press,
you will almost certainly interact with companies and employees
across borders," Hudzik says. "Are you going to know how to do
that? We tend to glorify what we do [in international education]
in terms of how many students we have from abroad, or how
many of our students are studying abroad. But we don't focus
on what students actually learn from an international curriculum-in terms of knowledge, skills and employability. What do
employers think about the readiness of our students to work in a
global environment?"
Considering the employers' perspective means rethinking the
traditional approach to educating, he says.
"If you're going to internationalize the curriculum, don't sit
there and talk to them," says Hudzik. "Get [students] out there
interacting with people from other cultures in project-based and
team-based activities. Take language instruction. The idea that
you dump students into a foreign language class five hours a week
and do language drills is a very ineffective way to teach languages."
With the future of international enrollments in the United
States uncertain, leaders across U.S. campuses need to look critically at what's been working and how they can adapt or change to
the new landscape. n

53  



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - July/August 2018

From the Desk of
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Brazil
Quick Questions
Feature: A Shock to the System
Feature: Something Old, Something New
Feature: Building on Strengths
Feature: Weathering the Storm
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - July/August 2018 - GF1
International Educator - July/August 2018 - GF2
International Educator - July/August 2018 - GF3
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 2
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 3
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 4
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 5
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 6
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 7
International Educator - July/August 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - July/August 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 10
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 11
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 12
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 13
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 14
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Global Spotlight: Brazil
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 17
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: A Shock to the System
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 19
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 20
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 21
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 22
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 23
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: Something Old, Something New
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 25
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 26
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 27
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 28
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 29
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 30
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 31
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: Building on Strengths
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 33
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 34
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 35
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 36
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 37
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Feature: Weathering the Storm
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 39
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 40
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 41
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 42
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 43
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 45
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 46
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 47
International Educator - July/August 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 49
International Educator - July/August 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 51
International Educator - July/August 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 53
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Forum
International Educator - July/August 2018 - 55
International Educator - July/August 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - July/August 2018 - Cover4
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