International Educator - May/June 2019 - 33

"For these students, the admission
process is hard enough without adding
testing and financial aid applications," says
Keteku. "Asking them to take the SAT or
GRE on top of the TOEFL is too much."
Passing one of several regional
exams to attend university, such as the
West African Senior School Certificate
Examination (WASSCE), may be enough
of a proxy, she says.
Institutions in the United States
report using different approaches, with
some forgoing testing and some reducing
application requirements for incoming
African students.
"We shifted to test optional 2 or 3 years
ago for undergraduates, which has helped
undergrads internationally, as well as
domestically," GW's Lav says.
University of Rochester's Burdick says
that placing a limit on the weight given to
standardized tests like the SAT "has paid
off beautifully in academic performance
and outcomes in terms of careers and
graduate education."
Many recruiters who work with
African students say that fully leveraging
EducationUSA resources is vital in
reaching and preparing students.
"Students who use EducationUSA
services qualify for visas," says Keteku.
"That is not because of any inside
connection-contrary to popular belief,
there is none-but instead because
EducationUSA teaches students how
to think, how to make their own
educational plans and decisions, and
how to talk about it. One of the biggest
problems that agents face is the low visa
issuance rate of their students, because
the private consultants do too much of
the work for them."
There are some applicable regional
trends, Dieng says. "Some African
countries, such as Ghana and Nigeria, have
a much higher visa denial rate than Senegal
or the Ivory Coast," he says. "This is also an
area that requires education on the part of
the U.S. institution."

"We need to figure out how to develop a strategy that
allows us sustained engagement, and that means finding
a right partner." -SAMBA DIENG
Many U.S. institutions offer special
support services specifically for
international students from Africa. GW,
which in 2018 had more than 130 African
students, offers success programs to fill in
knowledge gaps, such as help with science
and mathematics, Lav says.
Dickinson College created a special
bridge program for students whose
educations have been interrupted by
conflict. The program's first four students,
who have since thrived at Dickinson,
Ensign says, were students who fled the
Boko Haram violence in Nigeria.
Addressing cultural gaps is also
important. "One time, I taught a
development class [in Africa] and a
student refused to look me in the eye or
participate," Ensign says. "I asked him why
he wasn't engaging. He told me, 'in my
high school, if I looked a teacher in the
eye, I was beaten.' You have to understand
where these students are coming from."

Recruitment Strategies
Keeping both student and university
goals in mind is pivotal when crafting a
recruitment plan. The goals of African
international students vary, because as a
group they are a diverse population. Many
focus on science, technology, engineering,
and mathematics (STEM), business, and
other pragmatic degrees, given the very
real employment challenges many will face
when they return to their home country.
Additionally, many students seek
opportunities to emigrate permanently,
though growing economic opportunities in
some African countries are drawing more
back home after graduation than in the
past, Keteku says.
In 2010, University of Rochester's
Burdick recruited 10 students from Africa

on full scholarships, hoping that the initial
investment would make Rochester a
destination for African students for years
to come. The initial 10 students found
success at Rochester, and the number of
African international students on campus
has steadily grown to more than 260
undergraduates from at least 34 African
countries, Burdick says.
"We have reached the point where
we have probably found our natural limit
on need-based financial aid," Burdick
says. "Most [of the African students] are
engineering majors, though majors have
spread to other things like public health
and business. We are now visiting more
private schools in Africa than we used to,
and our record of success from our African
graduates has allowed us to get more
doctors' and diplomats' kids than we used
to. Our goal remains the same: we want
the best students."
Sometimes an inflection point for
targeting African students can be the
development of an institution's overall
international recruitment strategy.
"When I came to the University of
Georgia more than 7 years ago, there was
no specific strategic international student
recruitment plan; it was mostly based
and built on the domestic recruitment
plan," says Goyen, a South African native
who came to the United States for her
undergraduate and graduate degrees.
As part of developing a strategic
recruitment plan, Goyen visited South
Africa to connect with the schools that
UGA had historically tapped for prospective
students. Then, she encouraged African
students already studying at UGA to talk
with prospective students from their home
country about their positive experiences
on campus. Goyen even reached out
M AY + J U N.2019 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

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International Educator - May/June 2019

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - May/June 2019

From the Desk of
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Iran
Quick Questions
Feature: Africa’s Education Evolution
Feature: Mental Health: At Home and Abroad
Feature: The Faces of International Education
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment Management
International Education Leadership
Forum
Take 5
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Cover1
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Cover2
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 1
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 2
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 3
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 4
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 5
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 6
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 7
International Educator - May/June 2019 - From the Desk of
International Educator - May/June 2019 - In Brief
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 10
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 11
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 12
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 13
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 14
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Global Spotlight: Iran
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Quick Questions
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 17
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 18
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 19
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Feature: Africa’s Education Evolution
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 21
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 22
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 23
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 24
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 25
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 26
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 27
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 28
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 29
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 30
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 31
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 32
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 33
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 34
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 35
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Feature: Mental Health: At Home and Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 37
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 38
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 39
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 40
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 41
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 42
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 43
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 44
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Feature: The Faces of International Education
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 46
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 47
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 48
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 49
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Education Abroad
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 51
International Educator - May/June 2019 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 53
International Educator - May/June 2019 - International Enrollment Management
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 55
International Educator - May/June 2019 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 57
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 58
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 59
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Forum
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 61
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 62
International Educator - May/June 2019 - 63
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Take 5
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Cover3
International Educator - May/June 2019 - Cover4
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