Pavement Preservation Journal - Spring 2012 - (Page 36)

CENTERS ‘Thin is In’ for New Texas Center Courses by Dr. Yetkin Yildirim, P.E. O ne of the primary goals of the Texas Pavement Preservation Center (TPPC) is training. TPPC training courses provide hands-on experience to a wide audience of engineers and technicians. The center provides training on pavement preservation techniques with courses tailored to meet the needs of today’s pavement industry. In this spirit, the Texas Pavement Preservation Center has developed two new training courses for 2012. • Thin Surfacings. One of these courses is titled Use of Thin Surfacing for Pavement Preservation and will be taught by TPPC staff. Participants in this course will learn the functions of different types of thin surfacing, ultra-thin (non-HMA) and thin HMA overlays. The course will cover when different types of thin surfaces are appropriate and will explain the characteristics of pavements that are viable candidates for thin surface pavement preservation treatments. The course will begin with an overall summary of pavement preservation concepts and explanation of the need for pavement preservation training. Next, participants in this course will learn the specific functions of different types of thin and ultrathin surfacing and will learn how to select proper candidates for preservation projects. This section will also cover the need for thin surface mixes in Texas, the steps in identifying and evaluating the potential asphalt pavement candidates for thin surfacing and the assessment of distress types. The course will present case studies where different types of ultra-thin overlays were utilized and will discuss the results and outcomes. This course will also include discussions of the mix designs of different thin overlays and the advantages and disadvantages to these different designs. Upon completion of this course, participants will have a full understanding of the need and benefits of pavement preservation projects, will be able to identify which type of thin surfacing treatment would be appropriate for specific signs of distress in aging pavements, and will be familiar with the process of selecting and modifying mix designs in order to suit the specific needs of the project at hand. • Thin HMA Overlays. The second new course recently developed by the Texas Pavement Preservation 36 TPPC training courses provide hands-on experience to a wide audience of engineers and technicians. Center is titled Construction of Thin Hot Mix Asphalt Overlays. This course also will be taught by TPPC staff, and will provide instruction in the proper construction of thin HMA overlays. Specifically, the course will begin by describing the need for thin HMA overlays, explaining the functions of thin HMA overlays in the context of pavement preservation, and describing the different types of thin HMA overlays. The discussions in this section will include the advantages of thin HMA overlays and the design tests available. Next, the course will cover construction and quality control procedures by describing the best practices in production, surface preparation and construction for thin HMA overlays. Additionally, this section will cover the lessons learned and best practices in placement and compaction, the quality control checks at plant and field, and will present the considerations to be taken during equipment inspection. Additional items in quality control checks for successful HMA construction include weather requirements, application rate determination, equipment calibration and traffic control. This course will conclude with a section covering troubleshooting. This fi nal section of the course will explain the causes and solutions to problems which may occur during the construction of thin overlays. By the end of this course, participants will have a much better understanding of thin HMA overlays. Participants will appreciate the need for thin HMA overlays and be familiar with the different types of overlays, be familiar with the entire process of thin HMA projects beginning with production and ending with construction, and they will be confident in their ability to take on thin HMA pavement preservation. Yildirim is director, Texas Pavement Preservation Center View past issues of the Pavement Preservation Journal online at www.naylornetwork.com/fpp-nxt http://www.naylornetwork.com/fpp-nxt

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Pavement Preservation Journal - Spring 2012

President’s Message
National Preservation Conference: Make Plans Now
Pavement Preservation is ‘Sustainable’ Choice
Deck Micro Surfacing Cuts Accidents, Wins Award
Enhanced Fog Seals Boost Chip Retention
Sophisticated ‘Seal Coats’ Enhance Texas DOT Pavement Preservation
Rejuvenating Treatment Preserves Runway, Grooving
Fine-Mill Pavements for Smooth Thin Overlays
Puerto Rico, Southeast States Focus on Preservation
Maryland Identifies Right Fix for Right Road, Right Time
‘Thin is In’ for New Texas Center Courses
Why to Cut Back on Cutback Asphalt
Test Sections Constructed at Virginia Smart Road
Ground Penetrating Radar Fills Gaps in PMS

Pavement Preservation Journal - Spring 2012

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