IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 49

gain international contacts and experience early on will be at an advantage. In fact, having the crosscultural skills necessary to work effectively in a multinational team is vital even if they never plan on leaving their home country, particularly in the United States with its high percentage of foreign-born researchers. Although the language of science is still primarily English, Michael Snyder, Manager for Asian Affairs at the American Chemical Society, says that the “world abounds with first-rate research institutions and first-rate researchers” and there has been a shift away from the intense concentration of advanced scientific research in the United States over the last 20 or 30 years. Ling Wong, a junior human biology major at Brown University who won a DAAD scholarship to study at Humboldt University in Berlin last year, says, “It really hit me in Berlin how international the field of biology really is. Amazing research is going on all over the world and being written about in many different languages.” Engineers are also being called upon more and more to work in international teams and in international locales as geography ceases to be a relevant factor in the search for suppliers, partners and clients. Experience abroad can set someone apart when they apply for a job or a promotion, particularly at the managerial level. “You think differently if you’ve spent time in other countries—it’s not necessarily the technical knowledge that you’ve gained, but learning how to work with people half a world away,” says Tim Neale, Boeing spokesman. total. Of these 175,000, only 17,500 (10 percent) were scientists and 5,075 (2.9 percent) engineers. Looking only at students who were actually granted a Bachelor’s degree in 2001 (the latest year for which statistics are available), however, the picture looks a little different. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports that 11.5 percent of Bachelor’s degrees conferred that year were in life, physical and health sciences. Since science students already make up about 10 percent of the total number of students studying abroad, their proportional representation is actually not that off. This number also represents a significant increase from 1993-94, when science students represented only 7 percent of the students going abroad. Students in engineering or science possess the usual motivations for study abroad: desire to learn about a new culture, have an adventure, master a language, make new friends, or enhance their résumé. Engineers, on the other hand, only made up 2.9 percent of students studying abroad, while nearly 6 percent of Bachelor’s degrees were awarded to students in engineering or engineering-related technologies. Engineers are underrepresented in the study abroad ranks, and that hasn’t changed much since 1993-94. At that point, 2.3 percent of students studying abroad were engineers. One recent indication that students in these fields are interested in going abroad when the right opportunity arises was the reaction to the new RISE program offered by DAAD. Although the program had a nearly nonexistent marketing budget, over 2,200 students registered in the database for information, 400 applied for internships, and a quarter of those were successfully placed with doctoral students in Germany. Given the fact that only 5,600 U.S. students in 2003-4 went to Germany for any study abroad, this number is astounding. When asked, many RISE interns say that they had not previously considered study in Germany. As Jeffrey Thompson, a physics major at Yale University, put it, “The program sounded good and the internships sounded interesting. I wouldn’t have cared much what country it was in, as long as speaking its language was not mandator y.” This student went abroad for very different reasons than someone who’s always wanted to spend a summer or a semester in a particular foreign country, and students like this one require new kinds of programs. Barriers to Study Abroad for Scientists and Engineers There are barriers to studying abroad that seem unique to scientists and engineers. It’s important to understand them so that programs can be designed accordingly and specific strategies can be developed to win over students, faculty, and administration. Students in these fields tend to have more required courses and they also have a harder time getting credit for coursework abroad. The way the courses are designed in these fields means that it’s possible that the first semester of Mechanical Engineering 101 covers different topics at one university than at another-–something that must be and has been overcome in national credit transfers and can be overcome in an international context as well. Ashley McDonough, a junior biology major and DAAD scholarship holder from Oregon State University who just Examining the Evidence The total enrollment in higher education in the United States was over 13 million in 2004, according to the College Board Annual Survey of Colleges. That means that the 175,000 U.S. students who studied abroad in 2003-4 (according to Open Doors 2004, where all of the study abroad statistics in this article are pulled from) represent just over 1 percent of the

IIE Networker - Fall 2005

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of IIE Networker - Fall 2005

IIE Networker - Fall 2005
Contents
Message from Allan E. Goodman
Up Front: The International Education Diary
Study Abroad for Students of Color
Programmatic Diversity Versus Unplanned Information Flows
Nurturing Leadership and Social Change: The Mission of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program
Study Abroad
Study Abroad
Africa
Australia
Science and Engineering
Students with Disability
The Browser: Index of Advertisers
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - IIE Networker - Fall 2005
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Cover2
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 3
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Contents
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 5
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 6
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Message from Allan E. Goodman
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Up Front: The International Education Diary
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 9
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 10
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 11
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 12
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 13
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 14
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 15
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Study Abroad for Students of Color
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 17
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 18
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 19
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 20
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 21
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 22
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 23
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 24
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 25
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 26
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 27
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Programmatic Diversity Versus Unplanned Information Flows
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 29
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 30
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 31
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Nurturing Leadership and Social Change: The Mission of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 33
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 34
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 35
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Study Abroad
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 37
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 38
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Study Abroad
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 40
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 41
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Africa
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 43
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Australia
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 45
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 46
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 47
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Science and Engineering
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 49
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 50
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 51
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Students with Disability
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 53
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 54
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 55
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 56
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - The Browser: Index of Advertisers
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - 58
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Cover3
IIE Networker - Fall 2005 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0212
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIED0112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIED1112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0211
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0111
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0210
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0110
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0209
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0109
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0208
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0108
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEb0207
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0107
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0206
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0106
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/IIEB0205
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com