Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 12

Thinking Global Balancing the need for more air travel and a greener world By John Blanchfield, Director, Technical Marketing, Airbus I It is early morning in rural east Africa. Virginia Wangira, a tiny lady in her 60s, hurries between the rows of climbing pea plants to where members of her family are tenderly pinching the succulent mange-tout pea pods and placing them in plastic buckets. “I have built a good business out of this crop,” she says. “Now life is better.” This story, drawn from a recent report—Aviation: the Real World Wide Web by Oxford Economics (and commissioned by Airbus)—may seem a world away from the bustling complexity of the airline industry. But it illustrates the issues we face as an industry and that the growth of aviation is not necessarily inconsistent with a better environment. Complex Connections Along with 200 other families, Virginia is part of a growers’ co-operative in the village of Kinangop in the Abadare hills of western Kenya. She rarely travels more than a few miles from her home, but her livelihood is dependent on air transport—what she grows will arrive on supermarket shelves in the U.K. within a couple of days of being picked. As the report shows, we live in a single, global economy, to a great extent made to work by aviation. Not only does the industry represent a large slice of economic activity in its own right, employing 5.5 million people and generating US$425 billion of GDP, its role as a facilitator for other activities significantly multiplies this impact. If you were to include its contribution to tourism, the figures grow to more than 33 million jobs and US$1.5 trillion of GDP. As a country, this would rank aviation’s position in the world economy as eighth, between Italy and Spain. The Kinangpop growers, and other examples like them across Africa, demonstrate that this isn’t just a phenomenon of the developed world. Developing countries have the same level of dependence on aviation, possibly even more so because it allows them to leverage assets such as favorable growing conditions, tourism and cheaper labor. Virginia’s mange-tout peas will fly to the U.K. in the cargo holds of aircraft that have brought tourists to the wildlife reserves of the Masai Mara and Serengeti and the tropical beaches around Mombasa. Aviation helps developing countries in areas beyond just tourism or agriculture. India is an example of a country whose potential has been realized largely as a result of aviation. Despite having a large, educated workforce, India’s economic growth had been hampered by a lack of basic infrastructure, especially air travel. The construction of an international airport has now helped create areas such as Bangalore—India’s Silicon Valley. Avoiding a Narrow Focus and Simple Solutions The Kenyan story illustrates that things are not as simple as they may first appear. Attention in parts of the developed world has recently focused on the energy costs of transporting food, The Airbus A380 taking flight in Mumbai. 12 The official publication of the International Society of Transport Aircraft Trading

Jetrader - January/February 2010

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Jetrader - January/February 2010

Jetrader - January/February 2010
A Message from the President
Contents
Calendar/News
Q&A: Randy Tinseth
Thinking Global
Dateline: Dubrovnik
Aircraft Appraisals
Aviation History
From the ISTAT Foundation
Advertiser Index
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Jetrader - January/February 2010
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Cover2
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - A Message from the President
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 4
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Contents
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 6
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Calendar/News
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Q&A: Randy Tinseth
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 9
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 10
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 11
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Thinking Global
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 13
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 14
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Dateline: Dubrovnik
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 16
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 17
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Aircraft Appraisals
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 19
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 20
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Aviation History
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - 22
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Advertiser Index
Jetrader - January/February 2010 - Cover4
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