Ear to the Ground - Spring 2012 - (Page 14)

FEATURE P RO V I D E D B Y I N F R A S T R U C T U R E H E A LT H & S A F E T Y A S S O C I AT I O N The signs of spring: Traffic Protection W hether you are setting up for long-term work on a busy roadway, or for a short job in the middle of a busy intersection, companies have two critical responsibilities: 1. Keep your workers safe from traffic hazards. 2. Protect the public travelling through your work zone. 1. Keep Your Workers Safe from Traffic Hazards The Occupational Health and Safety Act and the Construction Regulation set out responsibilities and requirements for working around traffic. Federally regulated companies should look to the Canada Labour Code Part ll for traffic protection requirements. You need a written traffic protection plan when you do work that exposes employees to traffic-related hazards. Here are some things that can keep your workers safe: Commercial vehicles: Emergencies on Roadways 1. 2. 3. 4. If your commercial vehicle breaks down, Remain calm Signal to leave the roadway Reduce your speed as quickly as possible Bring your vehicle to stop as far off the road as possible. Emergency warning devices Any commercial vehicle operating on a provincial highway between one-half hour before sunset to one-half hour after sunrise must have an adequate supply of emergency warning devices. While these specific times are outlined in the Highway Traffic Act, a defensive driver will use warning devices whenever needed and particularly when visibility is reduced by fog, rain, or snow. Emergency warning devices include flares, lamps or lanterns that have been approved by the Ministry of Transportation (MTO). They must be capable of continuously producing two warning lights, each visible from a distance of at least 150 metres (500 feet) for a period of at least eight hours. MTO approved portable reflectors can also be used. At least two warning devices must be placed • approximately 30 metres (100 feet) in front of the vehicle • approximately 30 metres (100 feet) to the rear of the vehicle. The rearward device must be visible from at least 150 metres (500 feet). If there is a hill, curve, or other obstruction within 150 metres (500 feet) of the disabled vehicle an additional warning device must be placed beyond the obstruction (i.e., so that oncoming drivers can see it before they get to the obstruction—refer to image below). This is because the obstruction can prevent drivers from seeing the disabled vehicle. 14 EAR TO THE GROUND http://www.orcga.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Ear to the Ground - Spring 2012

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
INTERNATIONAL NEWS: ‘811 BIKE’ PROMOTES SAFE DIGGING MESSAGE ON DISCOVERY CHANNEL’S AMERICAN CHOPPER: SENIOR VS. JUNIOR
INTERNATIONAL NEWS: UPDATE FROM THE CCGA - A UNIFIED APPROACH TO DAMAGE PREVENTION
Q&A: A CONVERSATION WITH CORAL LUKANIUK, PUBLIC AWARENESS PROGRAM MANAGER, TRANSCANADA
THE SIGNS OF SPRING: TRAFFIC PROTECTION
BLOCKED SEWER SERVICE LINE? CALL BEFORE YOU CLEAR
CHEERS TO ORCGA VOLUNTEERS
LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT
ORCGA’S HALL OF FAME MEMBERS AND MEMBER OF THE YEAR
ORCGA’S EXCAVATOR OF THE YEAR
JOE JOHNSON EQUIPMENT – ONE OF CANADA’S 50 BEST MANAGED COMPANIES
ORCGA’S 2012 SYMPOSIUM
ADVERTISER.COM

Ear to the Ground - Spring 2012

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http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/RGCB0112
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http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/RGCB0111
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/RGCB0210
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/RGCB0110
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/RGCB0209
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/naylor/RGCB0109
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