IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 20

FASHION: A Sustainable Source of Inspiration
There has always been a strong link between the world of fashion and the built environment. Fashion
designers often cite architecture and interiors as a source of inspiration for new lines, while interior
designers often turn to fashion for new color stories or patterns.
But when it comes to some of today's biggest movements, the built
environment often takes the lead.
Consider sustainability. With programs like LEED, architecture and
interior design have prioritized eco-friendly and zero waste practices for
decades. And now fashion brands, from Adidas to Mara Hoffman to Ecoalf,
Lauren Visco
are taking up the mantle, acknowledging the global waste crisis and recycling
post-consumer materials for new designs.
"It had to start with us, the designers," says Jennifer Rogers, IIDA, an interior designer at
Perkins+Will in Washington, D.C. "We're creating the spaces that people live and exist in every
single day. Once interior designers began preaching sustainability-and implementing it in fashion
designers' stores, their runways, and even their homes-fashion picked up on the movement."
We also see this influence with the idea of reusing. In the interiors world, this came about
thanks to platforms like Airbnb and VRBO. "Essentially, an interior environment is designed to
attract visitors as they rent an entire [house] or apartment for a certain time period," says Lauren
Visco, an interior designer at DesignBridge in Chicago. "I think the fashion industry saw this idea
of renting out spaces and thought, 'why can't we do the same?' Therefore, we saw the emergence of
websites like Rent the Runway and TheRealReal. They changed the fashion industry by allowing
people to rent the same outfit worn by others, or purchase a previously used fashion piece-
ultimately decreasing the fashion global footprint because of this recycling idea."

NIGHTLIFE: A Space for Experimentation
Nightclubs have long been destinations for counterculture entertainment. In New York, for
example, the underground ball scene allowed the LGBTQ community to come together to "act
out, act up, and take on different personas," says Catharine Rossi, co-editor
of Night Fever: Designing Club Culture, 1960-Today and co-curator of the
corresponding touring exhibition, which ran at the Vitra Design Museum in
Weil am Rhein, Germany last year. "The importance of the club and the dance
floor is that it is a kind of hidden space where people can connect and come
together and also escape as well. We all need somewhere that we can escape to."
Catherine Rossi
Design has always been interwoven with that experience, helping to create
a unique atmosphere and solidifying the experience. For example, architects and designers who were
part of Italy's Radical Design movement in the late 1960s-think Superstudio and Gruppo 9999-
developed clubs, such as Space Electronic, that were highly theatrical and experimental in nature.
"There is a strong connection between club culture, architecture, and design," says Rossi, who
is also a design historian at Kingston University in London. "Nightclubs are a specific architectural
typology, which was really only invented in the 1960s: spaces designed for nocturnal revelry, often
concealed in some way, and made of artificial light and sound as much as bricks and mortar."
The influence of these spaces-and their reliance on distinct design-lasts today. For
example, designing nightclubs influenced how Ian Schrager, a designer of the iconic Studio
54, eventually created his hotels, including the Gramercy Park Hotel in New York and Public
Hotel (now the Ambassador Hotel) in Chicago. "In particular, [it reiterated the] importance of
having atmosphere and how to design atmosphere into other spaces," Rossi says. "You can see
that in the lobbies of his hotels."

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS:
Designing Power for the People
The right design can empower. Just ask
Jayna Zweiman.
In 2016, while
recovering from a
serious injury, the Los
Angeles–based artist
and design architect
Jayna Zweiman started brainstorming
ways she could make her support
known for the 2017 Women's March in
Washington, D.C. without physically
being there. Using her recently honed
knitting skills, Zweiman starting crafting
caps-and the pussyhat was born.
After Zweiman and her then-partner
Krista Suh released the pattern on the
Pussyhat Project website, the pink hats
were worn by millions of people during
women's marches around the world.
The hat quickly became a symbol of the
contemporary women's rights movement.
Zweiman believes the design resonated
because it allowed people to be politically
active no matter where they were-a
crowded march or simply walking down
the street.
"It's amazing how a design project
can say something [so powerful]-and
let people recognize their own agency,"
Zweiman says.
Since the pussyhat, Zweiman has
started designing handmade blankets
for new U.S. immigrants as a symbol
of greeting, a direct contrast to
immigration policies the United States
has recently employed.
"Designing how people can use
space, who feels welcome, who feels
safe, and who feels ownership can mean
the potential of creating truly equitable
design," she says. "Traditionally, people
often think of political posters as
design for social change. It's much
bigger than that."

Credit

"Ultimately, interior
help to create a better
20

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IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019

IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019
From IIDA
Contents
Next
Talk, Talk
Pre/Post
Powered by Design
From the Ashes
That Creative Spark
The Hybrid Hotel
Change of Seat
Scratch Pad
Insider Intel
IIDA News + Updates
Why This Design Works
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Cover2
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - From IIDA
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 2
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Contents
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 4
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 5
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Next
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 7
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 8
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 9
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 10
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 11
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Talk, Talk
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 13
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Pre/Post
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 15
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Powered by Design
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 17
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 18
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 19
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 20
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 21
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 22
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 23
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - From the Ashes
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 25
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 26
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 27
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 28
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 29
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 30
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 31
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - That Creative Spark
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 33
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 34
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 35
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 36
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 37
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - The Hybrid Hotel
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 39
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 40
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 41
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 42
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 43
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Change of Seat
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 45
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 46
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 47
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 48
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 49
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Scratch Pad
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 51
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Insider Intel
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 53
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - IIDA News + Updates
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - 55
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Why This Design Works
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Cover3
IIDA Perspective - Summer 2019 - Cover4
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